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14

No. If you are that dire for things to happen quickly fill one plastic bottle each time you bottle. It will be firm once the beer is carbed. You can simply re-use 16-20oz soda bottles for this, or buy plastic beer bottles with screw on caps.


7

Northern Brewer/Midwest has come under a lot of pressure as of lately regarding their glass Big Mouth Bubbler product line. They've confirmed that they are curating their reviews that are submitted to the site. If they are negative, they claim to contact the reviewer personally to resolve their complaints and remove the negative review. If you do a search ...


6

A time test is your best bet. Bottle carbonation should be pretty mechanical unless you're experimenting with conditioning yeasts. If you're not doing anything fancy with the carbonation, it should be safe to assume that your beer is done carbonating after two weeks.


6

Do not use milk bottles for bottling. They can't withstand the pressure from carbonation and will be likely to explode.


5

If you can find stoppers at your local HBS that fit them, you can use them for yeast starters or small test batches. Since it's clear glass though, you might be better off getting your deposit back from whole foods. Without a good cap and UV protection, they're not much use for bottling.


4

Don't do it. They are not meant to be heated. You could heat it before hand and put it into an insulated cooler, and that would hold the heat for a long time.


3

Yeah, it pretty much is a constant risk. I broke 3 before I stopped using glass, one of them by just setting it carefully on a carpeted floor. I finally switched over to buckets and wonder why I didn't do it sooner. I've brewed over 400 batches using bucket fermenters and I have yet to find a down side.


3

I usually wait a couple weeks then look for trub in the bottom of the bottle. If it's there, the yeast finished the job.


2

Use PBW - it'll shift pretty much anything without requiring any scrubbing. LD Carlson's Easy Clean is not the same as PBW. Easy Clean is an oxygen-based cleaner, while PBW is an alkali-based cleaner. I've used both, and can say without doubt that PBW is much better for cleaning carboys. With PBW the hot water is not strictly necessary, but it does help ...


2

I often open one after a few days, and then I'll often open one every day or two after that. I find it interesting to see how it changes in the 2-3 weeks while it's carbonating. How many bottles are in the batch? Is it a big deal if you lose a few before they were completely ready? Another thing you can do is determine the carbonation level roughly by ...


1

In response to your question about precautions, to add to the other good advice, both Northern Brewer and Midwest Supplies recommend using their brew hauler that is specially tailored to the Big Mouth Bubbler glass fermenter for moving them around. This is probably good advice for any glass carboy -- the cost of this webbing-based system is only about US$10. ...


1

Off flavors come from process issues and sanitation issues. An example of a process issue would be over-pitching or under-pitching yeast, or over oxygenating or splashing while transferring and oxidizing finished beer. Sanitation issues are off flavors from microbial infection. I would say that most of the time off flavors are generated through process ...


1

I can't comment on Palmer's observations, I haven't had a plastics-related infection. Generally, from a scratch standpoint glass is better than plastic, when it comes to using carboys as fermenters. But only from that standpoint. Plastic carboys are superior in a lot of ways, but hard to clean because you can't just go at them with a bottle brush. ...


1

This is possible, but not in a scientifically measurable way. Try this: Hold one of your bottles of beer up to the light so you can see the air gap that expands from the top of the bottle down to the top of the beer in the bottle. Quickly turn the bottle upside down then back again, with a slight amount of force, but no need to shake it. Observe the air ...


1

When I brew, I usually will do a number of mini bottles. Like the OP, I'm not one for patience. :) This allows me to have test bottles with minimal waste.



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