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3

Based purely on personal experiance I would say ~200g of boiled ginger per 23L will give a light background taste. I use ~1kg to make it the most prominent taste (like the ginger cider I brewed last weekend).


3

No hands on experience on this kind of brew, but a few thoughts: You have a few options, add the ginger to the boil, to the primary fermenter or to the secondary fermenter (or if you don't have/use another fermenter, to the primary after the active fermentation is done). Each will most likely give different results, I would guess adding it to the boil may ...


3

A ginger bug is simply a lactic acid culture started from raw ginger root (with skin still on) and sugar mixed together in dechlorinated water. When you "add the ginger bug" to your drink recipe, you're adding the liquid from this culture after straining out the chopped ginger bits. After the ginger bug has been allowed to mature to a slightly fizzy state ...


3

There's a good article about the ginger beer plant (which I think is your ginger bug) on this website. http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2008/07/ginger-beer-plant-101.html.


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There's a recipe on this page, geared towards someone without brewing experience, so it should be a breeze for a homebrewer. I haven't personally tried it though. It is a shorter, simpler brewing process that that of beer. You could make it with a homebrew equipment kit. For carbonation, if you follow their recipe, you run the risk of making bottle bombs. ...


2

Well, theoretically you can add any kind of yeast to any kind of grape extract and, provided conditions are sanitary, you don't get an infection, and you give it enough time to ferment, you will have a wine of some sort. Unfortunately, it probably won't be very good. In fact, it will probably be horrible. To make drinkable wine will require proper juice, ...


1

One thing you could try is to add some ginger extract to a bottle of commercially made IPA to test it out. If you like the result, you can further experiment with the amount of ginger you think is appropriate to add to the beer. If you don't like it, then you just avoided brewing 5 gallons of beer you won't want to drink. If you decide to do this ...


1

is it better to use organic ginger That depends on a lot of factors but organic produce seems to have better taste than conventional produce. As to what kind of sugar it entirely depends on what color you want the liquid to have and the taste. Here's a good ginger bug recipe Break off a knob from your hand of ginger, peel away its papery skin ...


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In malt beer production, we (can) bottle after the primary fermentation, often making a simple syrup of priming sugar to aid CO2 production. You can also purchase “carb tabs” (sugar pills) which have really simplified my life but receive mixed reviews online. Added sugar will dry out the taste slightly and you probably still have enough sugar and yeast in ...


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To Exactly answer your questions: Is it possible, Does anyone know the process? Yes, you would have to ferment some wine then add a very high ABV% of Alcohol, acquired, paid or distilled by another means. Example ratio: 300ml of 10% wine + 700ml of 80% spirit = 59%ABV How much yeast, should I use in the grape juice? Go for 1 tsp per gallon(4.5L). can I ...


1

Buy some wine yeast - don't use bread yeast - wine yeast is more alcohol tolerant and will give you the best chance of producing something like wine. But even so, nowhere near 60% - most yeasts stop around 14-18 percent abv.


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That kick of ginger typically gets stronger with longer steeping time. After some experimentation, I'm convinced that the "bundenburg" flavor comes from long steeping and pear juice.


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I've had success using 3-5 lbs of fresh ginger in a 5 gallon batch of ginger soda. I find it's important to very finely cut the ginger (I use a strong blender/food processor). Once I've simmered the ginger for about 15-30 minutes, I strain the pulp into a grain sock and squeeze as much liquid as possible from it. I use my hands to do the pressing ...


1

Up front sharpness comes from acidity and to some degree, the level of carbonation. Most soft drinks have citric acid, and some phosphoric acid to create a sharpness to balance the sugar, and have a high level of carbonation (>3 vols CO2) Getting that sharpness is a balance thing - if you have too much sugar compared to the acid the drink will not be sharp, ...


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I used Champagne yeast. Nice and fizzy.


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I made a Ginger ESB using Wyeast 1968 that turned out quite tasty. It's got some nice fruity esters and flocculates quite nicely.


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I have made this one and like it http://www.brewuk.co.uk/store/recipes-ginger-beer


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I've been using this recipe and making about about a liter at a time: http://www.jeffreymorgenthaler.com/2008/how-to-make-your-own-ginger-beer/ It's pretty good but it's not like Reed's, it's way dryer. Next time I do it I'm going to try adding pineapple juice and lime juice, maybe instead of or in addition to the sugar, because it should be sweeter. Also ...



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