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5

During the start of the fermentation the Yeast reproduces quickly using the oxygen present in the beer and produces diacetyl which imparts a buttery flavor. Which is why it is usually recommended to start the fermentation at a lower temperature to slow down the diacetyl production (and the reproduction rate, I suppose). The beer fermentation is then ...


4

If you're making Ginger Beer, you really need a Ginger Beer Plant, which is a particular kind of yeast/bacteria blend. This will help get the appropriate acidity in the finished product. Ginger Beer Plant 101 If you're making Beer flavored with Ginger, I'd say use a yeast that's appropriate for the beer style. I used Safale S-04 (and a dead package of ...


3

Bottle priming takes typically 2 weeks, depending upon temperature and yeast health. The bottles should initially be stored at room temperature so the yeast can produce CO2 from the priming sugar, which takes 2-3 days. If you opened the bottle then, you'd get a loud hiss and flat beer, since all the CO2 is in the headspace. After the CO2 is produced, it ...


3

Using ReaLemon could negatively affect your ginger beer, but it is hard to tell the effect without knowing the concentration of free sulfite (SO2) in ReaLemon. ReaLemon's label says it contains sulfite and the manufacturer says that any of their products that mention sulfites "contains 10 ppm or more of sulfites". After a short period of tolerance, ...


3

Ignoring the other ferementables (lime and pineapple juice) 3 cups of sugar weights about 600g - or 1.32lb. Table sugar has a potential of 1.046 points per pound per gallon, which gives an estimated SG of 46 x 1.32 / 2 = 30 gravity units So your ginger beer would have had an initial SG of 1.030. I plugged these figures into BeerSmith, which computes ...


3

No hands on experience on this kind of brew, but a few thoughts: You have a few options, add the ginger to the boil, to the primary fermenter or to the secondary fermenter (or if you don't have/use another fermenter, to the primary after the active fermentation is done). Each will most likely give different results, I would guess adding it to the boil may ...


3

This is a little different than "Ginger Beer", so I'm not sure what you are exactly making because your post does not make it completely clear. However, I have had success making a naturally fermented Ginger Soda from a recipe our of Sandor Katz's wonderful book, "Wild Fermentation" which I recommend to any beer maker as an interesting read. Anyway, ...


3

I never go past 3 weeks on the primary yeast cake. If left too long the yeast can start to consume some of the trub material and produce "off" flavors. A month probably will be fine and I'm sure there are those who leave it sitting on the trub longer but I like to take it off and play on the safe side.


3

Well if you threw a hefewiezen yeast in there it would be odd, so yes yeast choice matters.


3

There's a recipe on this page, geared towards someone without brewing experience, so it should be a breeze for a homebrewer. I haven't personally tried it though. It is a shorter, simpler brewing process that that of beer. You could make it with a homebrew equipment kit. For carbonation, if you follow their recipe, you run the risk of making bottle bombs. ...


3

A ginger bug is simply a lactic acid culture started from raw ginger root (with skin still on) and sugar mixed together in dechlorinated water. When you "add the ginger bug" to your drink recipe, you're adding the liquid from this culture after straining out the chopped ginger bits. After the ginger bug has been allowed to mature to a slightly fizzy state ...


3

There's a good article about the ginger beer plant (which I think is your ginger bug) on this website. http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2008/07/ginger-beer-plant-101.html.


3

If primary fermentation is complete, adding priming sugar only allows the wort to consume the newly added sugar; it doesn't continue to ferment afterward. In a 5gal corny keg, 4 oz of corn sugar will be sufficient. You must leave it at room temp (just like a bottle) for a couple of weeks. It should carbonate just fine. (Akin to cask conditioning). You can ...


2

Yeasts can be stored in cold temperatures for quite a while, provided they aren't open to the air. I'm not sure about lactic bacteria though, since a lot of them are located in other living organisms. Best bet would be to split your plant, try to keep one going with a friend or family member as fatboab suggested, and keep the other in the refrigerator. If ...


2

Give it to a friend to look after. I can remember my wee brother looking after a friends plant while they were on holiday. The reward? My brother got some of the plant, which he grew on and we got ginger beer.


2

Carbonation is indeed a by-product of fermentation, the yeast will consume sugar and produce alcohol and co2. Some yeast strains will consume more sugar before the alcohol concentration gets too high and they go into 'hibernation' (floculate and settle to the botton). Lower temperatures will also cause some strains of yeast to floculate and stop ...


2

You can ferment the ginger beer until it's completely dry and then sweeten it when serving. Make a simple syrup (boil equal weights of water and sugar until the sugar has dissolved). Put a small amount of syrup in the glass before pouring the ginger beer. It's a bit more work, but aside from pasteurizing, I don't know any other way to get a sweet, low ...


2

The recipe you followed is for a (mostly) non-alcoholic ginger beer (a soda/soft drink). The fermentation here is really just for carbonation. Not sure if you get Fentiman's where you live, but it's like that. It should be sweet with little alcohol, so you did it right. Adding more ginger flavor is easy - just add more ginger. I use this recipe for a soft ...


2

I wouldn't leave it more than 3 weeks in primary. I expect it will be done in 2 weeks max, so you could bottle any time from 2-3 weeks from start of fermentation. Many will say 4 weeks is fine, but you're definitely in the area of picking up a yeast bite. I've left beers in primary for 4 weeks at 18C and they've been undrinkable.


1

A month is nothing to worry about, and in fact common for many brewers. I leave brews in the primary for 4-6 weeks quite often. The concern the others are referring to is called autolysis. It's very unlikely to happen in a month. Here's a clip from Palmer for more information about it. http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter10-3.html


1

EDIT since I made my answer you changed from Cider to Ginger beer*** @brodul I have used bakers yeast with a cider in the past and I found the taste of the brew to be ...yeasty in flavor. It was my first cider that wasn't from a kit so it could have been my error, but since then I have used proper cider/Champaign yeast with much better results. If you want ...


1

I make ginger beer with ginger beer plant. I tried using lemon juice with preservatives exactly once and ended up killing my plant, and this was in similar concentrations, about 3-4 tablespoons in a gallon of juice. Ginger beer plant is a combination of yeast and bacteria, not just straight brewer's yeast like you are using, so maybe it has less tolerance ...


1

The recipe is 2 liters, with 1 lemon's worth of juice (15ml) diluted. With that much dilution, the sulphate content in ReaLemon would have to be absurdly high to permanently affect the yeast. If you can get hold of a lemon fruit, then use that. It's not been processed and you will get much better aromatics in the final product. But if you really can't get ...


1

I think if you want a sweet-flavored, lightly-alcoholic (under 10%ABV) beverage that is also carbonated, you're going to have to keg and force carbonate. You might be able to slow the yeast down with refrigeration, but any that live will pick up and keep going if you ever remove your bottles from the cold environment. The kits include non-fermentable ...


1

I've used hefewiezen yeast in ciders (wyeast 3068) and it added a slightly fruity flavor that bakka mentioned. Don't see how the subtle contribution of the wyeast would overpower the strong ginger flavor.


1

Beer yeasts use the Crabtree effect to undergo fermentation in the presence of (some) oxygen. On the other hand, bread yeasts prefer to undergo respiration rather than fermentation in the presence of oxygen. A byproduct of the TCA cycle is CO2-but not alcohol. If you limit your oxygen levels then you will get alcohol produced as the yeast will switch from a ...


1

That sounds suspect to me. The article suggests that wine yeasts are selected for low CO2 output sound right. The primary selection criteria for yeasts in brewing is taste and alcohol tolerance while the primary selection criteria for baking yeast is that it starts off faster. Secondly if you think about chemistry, you'd have to do something with the carbon ...


1

It says it in the article Wine yeasts are engineered to generate less CO2, So, according to it, for the same amount of alcohol produced (and fermented sugar), bread yest will generate more CO2 than wine yeast. I am not an expert, so I do not know if the statement is correct or not. Fermentation chemical reaction is C6H12O6 → 2 C2H5OH + 2 CO2 In ...


1

I used Champagne yeast. Nice and fizzy.


1

I made a Ginger ESB using Wyeast 1968 that turned out quite tasty. It's got some nice fruity esters and flocculates quite nicely.



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