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6

It is difficult to impossible to get much flavor out of watermelon due to its water content. There just isn't a of of flavor there to start with, and any sugars in the watermelon will be consumed by the yeast.


4

Clones of 21st Amendment Hell or High Watermelon wheat beer tend to add it late in primary or in secondary. Make your beer about 1/8th watermelon, and add everything.


4

Most likely Wine will never spoil so that it is dangerous to humans, but that is assuming that it actually fermented to a decent alcohol level. Alcohol will kill most bacterias and preserve the liquid. However if the bottle was open, keep an eye out for bugs and other things that can have fallen into it. Baring that it should be perfectly safe to drink, or ...


4

I use frozen fruit often. While it thaws mash it lightly to break it up, put on the bottom of the secondary and rack on top of it. This is the best I have found to get the most flavor.


3

Impossible to know based on the data supplied. Consume at your own risk. Likely its fine, but its impossible to give the right answer.


3

You can add canned fruit. Check the label to make sure it does not contain preservatives. Consider blending it in sanitized blender. Often people add it at the end of the primary fermentation to help prevent the fermentation being too vigorous and making a mess. Canned fruit is pasteurized. Frozen fruit could contain pathogens that are not killed by ...


3

Seeing how its puree >90% of it will be accessible to the yeast. Whether it all can be fermentable is a different question due to yeast health and the types of sugar (mostly fructose likely) in the fruit/puree. As for the change in gravity its not going to be significant. 1 lb of table sugar in one gallon would be ~1.046SG 190grams is about 42% of a pound. ...


3

You absolutely can. I do it all the time and have done it dozens of times. No problem at all.


2

That's a very quick response - was there still a lot of yeast in suspension? Keep that fermention covered any way you can - fruit flies are going to lose their minds over this stuff. I suggest a blowoff tube going into some sanitizer.


2

I've noticed over time that you want use lots and lots of fruit (if you think you used enough, add more), supplement with extract, puree the flesh (no rinds or skins) or use juice if possible, boiling kills some flavors, and don't use clarifying agents. You can probably substitute some of your wheat extract with light LME or DME. Depends on your recipe. Ask ...


1

I would think they would have a similar yield per pound as strawberries. I juiced 6lb of strawberries for 64oz (1/2 gallon) of juice.


1

Most fruit beer kits will give you a natural fruit extract flavoring to add post fermentation. With that in mind when I did my last Strawberry blonde from a kit I threw out the extract and made my own, since it was too artificial in flavor. Making your own for back flavoring. I juiced 3lb of fresh strawberries. Using a centrifuge grater style juicer it ...


1

When using frozen fruit of any kind from a commercial source, those berries are normally flash pasteurized to kill surface microbes. Following suit, I have brought water to a boil and dropped fresh berries in for 30-60seconds followed by a dunk in ice cold water to halt the process. Never had an issue putting them in beer that way. Frozen strawberries ...


1

There is a 3rd option that has worked well for me. Process can be found in the book Extreme Brewing by Sam Calagione (dogfish head brewing) Fruit Rest. Make your fruit addition at 150-170° on your wort chill down and hold temp for 20-30 minutes. This pasteurizes the fruit and allows it to meld with the wort, so it becomes a true fermentable addition to the ...


1

I have a few friends that made an apple flavoured beer, they added some apple pulp to the boil, and then added apple slices to the secondary. Regarding the caramel, I'd add it at the end of the boil, just to quickly flash sanitise it.


1

It is ultimately subjective, but historical tradition and commercial success does suggest there's an objective aspect, too. These are some of the things I've seen and/or experienced that work better/more accessibly than others: Blonde ale (Strawberry blonde, &c.) Hefeweissen/wheat ale Berliner Weisse (traditionally with a shot of woodruff or raspberry ...


1

Definitely not a bock...you want something that doesn't have a lot of flavor on it's own, generally (although I have added chanterelle mushrooms to a wee heavy). Good bases for fruit beers are something like A. wheat (not hefeweizen), or a blond ale. Things that won't conflict with the fruit.


1

I just made a watermelon wheat that came out great. The process involved first juicing the watermelon to separate the pulp. Then I added the juice to my sparge water so the watermelon flavor and sugars would be incorporated into the boil. The pulp was later added to the secondary to impart even more watermelon flavor. Overall, it was a lot of work but worth ...


1

Lactose. It's unfermented by standard brewing yeasts and leaves residual sweetness in the bottle/keg. And it doesn't take much to sweeten a brew. To figure out how much you need, mix lactose 1-to-1 by volume with boiling water and siphon off about 4 oz of your beer, then add the sweetener by the mL until it's the sweetness you want. Multiply to your volume, ...


1

Black malts usually contribute a roasty flavor and color enhancement. As far as I know, they shouldn't impart a fruity flavor. Caramel malts, on the other hand, do. Check your caramalts. Common flavor descriptions for roasted caramel malts between 80L and 120L are "raisin, plum, prunes, burnt sugar". See Castle Malting's Château Special B or Briess's ...


1

Add some boiled Bicarbonate of Soda, that will drop the Ph, start with one tsp in about 50ml. Aim to get the Ph to around a bit above 4 and then you should be OK.



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