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Temperature would be my first bet. You didn't mention what temperature you experienced during your primary fermentation. If your temperature was appropriate for the champagne yeast, then my next bet would be that your OG was not very high; therefore your yeast ate up what little sugar was present in a comparatively short time. Did you augment the bananas ...


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No. If you wait an extended period of time you can get autolysis from yeast and get some off flavors. But it would be a lot longer. If I were you I would add the fruit to secondary. Boiling will only take away from the aroma and flavor of the fruit. They probably suggest this to avoid contamination. As long as you have good sanitation I wouldn't worry about ...


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It's not really possible to answer this question without knowing how sweet the watermelon was. That is, we need to the watermelon's brix. When you added the watermelon, you added some water and some sugar. The sugar will ferment, increasing the alcohol content and the water will dilute, decreasing the alcohol content. According to this page, watermelons ...


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You've sussed out the two changes from the addition of the fruit: you'll dilute the original beer, and also change its gravity, which after more fermentation will result in a new FG. Ideally you'd measure the pre-addition specific gravity, the post-addition SG, and the post-ferment FG. The difference between the OG and the pre-add SG, plus the difference ...


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You can certainly try it. That's the major advantage of homebrewing. However, just because these beers are coming prepackaged nowadays doesn't mean that's the way its done in the place of origin. These things evolved really as beer cocktails. I think its far better to just add the lemonade to the beer in the glass. That way you have great beer to begin ...


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If you don't have a suitable wine, and wish to reduce the headspace, use sanitized marbles for displacement.


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The preferred choice of pears for making cider (or "perry") are collectively known as "perry pears". 'Abate Fetel', AKA 'Abbé Fetel', does not fall into this group. Abate Fetel is commonly described as "more sweet" than many other varieties, and because of this it is popular as one to eat rather than use for cider. The bitterness you tasted is more likely ...


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Its best to make a great wheat beer and mix it in the glass. That's how its done traditionally and you can make it to suit your taste that day. Just because our American commercialized culture is putting them in the same bottle doesn't mean its the best way to do it. They have access to more tools than we do as homebrewers for controlling the post ...


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One example that generated a beer with a significant (but not over the top) coconut presence was as follows: 16 ounces of shredded coconut 650ml 190 proof grain alcohol Five gallons of beer Shredded coconut was crammed in a quart mason jar and covered with grain alcohol for one week in order to make a tincture. The tincture was added to the fermeter, ...


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I think it should be fine. Relax, don't worry, have ... some cider?


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Your must is basically simple sugar and entirely fermentable. Your temps may be a little high so the yeast worked quickly. I'd be sure to leave the whole thing for a couple weeks to allow the yeast time to clean up some of the bi-products of fermentation. Then I'd rack to a new container for a longer aging period. Taste it then to see how it tastes. If ...


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Depends on the fruit. In The Art of Fermentation, Sandor Katz lists some fruits that will tend to go bad if they're left in the ferment for very long--soft fruits, like cantaloupe, watermelon, papayas, and bananas are the examples he gave.


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Fresh cider that is not pasteurized, treated with UV light, or another sterilization method can have wild yeast and bacteria present. These microbes can spoil your cider. Potassium sorbate is used to prevent yeast from reproducing. By itself, it does not kill yeast or bacteria. Potassium metabisulfite should be used in addition to produce a stable cider. ...


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The general principle is that the later you add it, the more fruit flavor will come through in the beer. Age, oxygen, heat and fermentation will "deaden" the delicate flavors. I'd suggest freezing the fruit to break down the cell walls plus kill bugs, then pitch slices into a mid-to-short secondary. That said, extract might give you more punch, or more ...


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The safest thing, though it's a bit of additional work, is to sweeten the cider in the glass. Put an ounce or two of concentrated apple juice in the bottom of your glass before pouring a bottle of cider. This technique adds a fresh apple taste, doesn't introduce any artificial sweetener off flavours, doesn't involve chemical stabilizers, and has no risk ...


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Any fermentable sugar you add will convert to alcohol and in turn create CO2. Any non-fermentable sweetner is a gamble on off flavors. A suggestion would be to allow it to finish dry, add a dose of potassium sorbate to prevent refermentation, add a tested amount of apple juice concentrate to your liking for sweetness, keg and force carbonate the batch. ...


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One difficulty you'll have with getting that signature shandy flavor when adding fruit to secondary is that the sweetness (sugar) of the juice will get converted to alcohol by the yeast, leaving you with mostly aroma, and a little flavor. A lot of people don't recognize how much sugar plays into the overall taste of the fruit. Without the sugars, it is not ...


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You'll need basic equipment: fermenting bucket or carboy airlock tools to get the juice out of the fruit (can be as simple as cheese cloth to squeeze the fruit or as fancy as a juicer) hose for racking For each batch: lots of fruit, preferably cheap wine yeast normal table sugar for some fruit: antigel to prevent gelation for some fruit: acid A web ...


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I would suspect adding all that pulp only you'll get hazy beer from all the fruit tannins. And those tannins may lead to a weird astringency depending on the type of fruit. But to experiment, I'd add it in secondary. Adding it at boils end would certainly generate pectin haze. It might not hurt to run some sanitizer through the juicer first.


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I'm new to this forum--just discovered it today, still feeling my way around--but thought I'd add a comment: my absolute first choice would be cherries, not extract, but cherries are rich in pectin, the protein that makes fruit jellies gel. It could leave a protein haze that would be a long time clearing, if it ever did. Wouldn't hurt the taste, only the ...


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On the safe side I have always ensured that I remove the fruit after around a week. If its a fruit that I want to ensure I get a lot of flavor out of I would make sure its chopped up and mashed. If its a really easy fruit to go bad I would suggest added Campden tablets to the must, this will lower the risk of it turning bad. You could always try removing ...


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Cherries have natural yeast on their surface so if you do not wash the cherries but place them in a jar with sugar they should ferment. According to my late grandfather (who made many, many batches of vishnick) you should allow it to ferment in a dark location for at least a year and then drain off the liquor after a year. The original jar should be covered ...


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I have brewed and ipa using magnum for bitering and tons of centennial and cascade hops, the result was a very heavy mango flavored ipa. This is the first time I used centennial, so I'm assuming this hop provided the mango flavor. Hope this help. Saludos


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I've had some excellent beer, such as Lost Abbey Judgement Day that used raisins or prunes in secondary, which give a very rich, caramel flavor that compliments big malty high alcohol and aged styles.



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