Hot answers tagged

20

You generally want to add fruit to the secondary fermentation. At this point, you already have alcohol that can help ward off any meanies hiding in your fruit. I am having trouble finding a source for this but I remember from a course I took that adding fruit to the primary will add more fruit smell and secondary would add more flavor. The smell part ...


11

There's probably a reason you haven't heard of people using either kiwi or papaya in brewing. Kiwi, papaya, pineapple, melon, and fig all contain enzymes (proteases) that affect proteins. Harold McGee's On Food and Cooking treats this subject. Papaya has long been used as a meat tenderizer, albeit an imperfect one. The McGee piece addresses mainly these ...


10

It depends on what you're doing really. Adding fruit can be risky as there is always a chance of contamination. I've made fruit beers before and didn't want to boil them and lose a bunch of flavor. So instead I opted to freeze the fruit, and then slowly thaw it out in the fridge. Now keep in mind that freezing will not guarantee no contamination, but it ...


10

What you're tasting is the distinct flavor of west-coast hops. Most people liken it to a citrus, grapefruit, or sometimes orange peel aroma and flavor. You might be getting guava from the combination of tangy hops and a sweet, sugar-cookie base from the malt. Racer 5 uses Centennial, Chinook, Cascade, and Columbus hops. I've heard that Islander IPA uses ...


10

It really depends on what you're after. Traditionally, dried bitter orange peel is added late in the boil for bitterness. Dried or fresh sweet orange peel can be added late in the boil for a bit of flavor, and fresh sweet orange peel can be added to the secondary for aroma. So, you need to think about and define what it is you want the orange peel to do ...


8

Slow down a second, DWRHAH. What makes you think this batch is contaminted("infected")? Vigorous fermentation is usually just a sign of good yeast health. Most of my batches of beer are done with the bulk of fermentation 24-48 hours after pitching. Honey, unlike malt, is mostly monosaccharides, and is actually easier for yeast to ferment, thus would progress ...


8

A good starting point for fruit additions in 1lb/gl. Strawberries are pretty subtle, though. I added 7.5lb to 5gl of blonde this summer, and the flavor was easily noticable without being overpowering.


7

I think it's possible to leave the fruit in there for too long, but I don't think a couple of weeks or even a month will hurt. As a homebrewer and home winemaker, I have two ways to look at this issue... Technically, when you ferment fruit you are making wine. When you add fruit to your secondary, one could argue that you're adding a bit of wine to your ...


6

Whenever possible I like to use Oregon Fruit Purees. These purees come in large cans that have been flash pasturized already. The fruit is also in a puree format so there is not additional prep and fruit to wort contact is superior to slicing and dicing the fruit. Also for seeded fruits like strawberries and blueberries, much of the seed material has been ...


6

I'd let it complete. You're not going to lose strawberry flavor by letting it ferment all the fruit. The sugar will attach the sugar from the berries; the flavor compounds will remain intact. Also, even if you keg it now - racking it off the fruit pulp - it will continue to ferment the berry sugar in the keg. The yeast and the fruit's naturally-...


6

It is difficult to impossible to get much flavor out of watermelon due to its water content. There just isn't a of of flavor there to start with, and any sugars in the watermelon will be consumed by the yeast.


5

Lemoncello is a possibility, but it is an infusion, not a fermentation of lemons. Cover lemons with vokda and let sit for a few weeks, then remove lemons and sweeten to taste. Works best with lemon zest, as whole lemons will have a lot of pith that will leave a bitter taste.


5

If you do use a bucket for the secondary then you can just keep the whole lot of berries in a muslin bag. Just don't make it too tight so there is enough circulation to impart the flavors. Other than that you may just have to convince yourself that it is an acceptable loss for some great beer.


5

If you can find fresh fruit I would suggest using that. If not, I would go with a puree over the flavoring liquids. I have heard that the flavoring liquids can come out tasting like cough syrup. I did a cherry stout not to long ago and couldn't find fresh cherries so I used 2 cans of cherry puree. It came out great. As for flavor, I love a raspberry wheat, ...


5

KEG IT NOW! I make a strawberry wheat too and the beauty of kegging is to not worry about the extra ferment. If you were bottling then you have the right idea you'd have to let it go. When I make mine I keg it when its at its peak. I usually make that beer in prep for my wife b-day which happens in late July. I plan it just right to ferment the beer, ...


5

Give it a swirl. I would avoid stirring personally due to potential sanitation issues. As for potential oxidation, you should be good there. You just racked beer on top of the cherries, so there's going to be some additional fermentation of the sugar from the fruit. This should produce enough CO2 to clear out the head space in your carboy, so you shouldn't ...


5

At first when I looked at it, I thought the bright white stuff you mentioned was actually glare from the lights with the distortion of the carboy, and that you were talking about the raspberries, which have since lost most of their color and look more like brains, if anything. Now that I know what you're talking about, that is definitely mold/bacteria, with ...


4

If you're looking to add real fruit to any brew you'll want to do so in secondary to get the most flavor. I've had really good success in taking my fruit of choice and pureeing it in a food processor with little vodka - about 1/4 cup per 2lb of fruit seems a good balance. The vodka will help kill off any additional bugs that may have made it past washing ...


4

For a definite cherry flavor, you should be using a sour cherry which will have less simple sugars and more unfermentables. Sweet cherries will ferment out dry and will add to your ABV disproportionate to flavor. A pound of cherries can have no more than 1 pound of sugars, obviously. When using simple sugars, i.e. brown sugar or molasses, etc about a ...


4

For fruit, get a refractometer. $50 or so online at williamsbrewing.com or other beer/wine shops. Mash up a handful of the fruit 'til it's juice and then dribble the juice on the refractometer lens. That will give you a brix reading. There's probably some formal math you can use to get exact numbers here, but here's some basic info: 24 brix when ...


4

Pectic enzyme is most effective when added before fermentation starts. Once there are ethanols present the pectic enzyme will still work but will take longer to be effective.


4

When you say fruit flavoring are you talking about extract? If you are I would use fresh fruit or a puree (Oregon brand) first. The extract can come out tasting like cough medicine. Using fresh or puree you can add directly to the primary fermentation vessel or if you are racking to a secondary you can add it then rack on top of it. I have had success both ...


4

Type of Fruit As with most flavor related questions...it depends; sorry. There are generally four or five fruit sources: Fresh Fruit, Frozen Fruit, Fruit Puree, Fruit Juice, and Fruit Extract. Each is going to give you a different flavor, and depending on the fruit flavor you're looking for, one or the other might be the best. The real answer is that you ...


4

Do you have access to millet? That's a very close sub for sorgum. This might not sound appealing, but millet is usually available in pet stores as bird food. Looking around, i spotted a few recipes on homebrewtalk.com for Rwandan banana beer, and a few folks used Oats instead of millet or sorgum, so that seems like a good sub as well, and certainly ...


4

You've sussed out the two changes from the addition of the fruit: you'll dilute the original beer, and also change its gravity, which after more fermentation will result in a new FG. Ideally you'd measure the pre-addition specific gravity, the post-addition SG, and the post-ferment FG. The difference between the OG and the pre-add SG, plus the difference ...


4

No. If you wait an extended period of time you can get autolysis from yeast and get some off flavors. But it would be a lot longer. If I were you I would add the fruit to secondary. Boiling will only take away from the aroma and flavor of the fruit. They probably suggest this to avoid contamination. As long as you have good sanitation I wouldn't worry about ...


4

Temperature would be my first bet. You didn't mention what temperature you experienced during your primary fermentation. If your temperature was appropriate for the champagne yeast, then my next bet would be that your OG was not very high; therefore your yeast ate up what little sugar was present in a comparatively short time. Did you augment the bananas ...


4

Clones of 21st Amendment Hell or High Watermelon wheat beer tend to add it late in primary or in secondary. Make your beer about 1/8th watermelon, and add everything.


4

I use frozen fruit often. While it thaws mash it lightly to break it up, put on the bottom of the secondary and rack on top of it. This is the best I have found to get the most flavor.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible