Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

It takes at least 3 days to be carbed with the sit and wait method you describe. But a week is really what you need to truly "equilibrate" to the pressure being set. In your case of shooting for >3 volumes I would definitely expect it to take a week. The beauty of kegging though is that there is no reason to not pull a half pour after day one, two, six ...


12

Firstly, be sure fermentation has completely finished before bottling. 1.029 is a high FG - from a SG of 1.090, that's about 8% abv. I would rouse the yeast, maybe even add additional yeast. You can use potassium sorbate to halt the fermentation, but at a relatively low 8% abv, you will need a lot of it, more than the 0.18g/l taste threshold. Better to let ...


8

The tank-side pressure is mostly measuring the temperature of the CO₂ tank, not the actual amount of CO₂ remaining. Above the triple-point of CO₂ at about 517 kPa ~ 75 psi, the pressure reading is dominated not by the amount of CO₂, but the temperature, which relates to the fraction of gas vs. liquid in that equilibrium. You'll notice your CO₂ tank will ...


7

If you happen to have access to a CO2 tank and just not the keg, you can use something like The Carbonator. It will go on the top of a 2 liter soda bottle and you can hook the CO2 up to that. My roommate has done this with great success, and I actually carbed a bit of my first batch of beer using this method because I was impatient. Another option would be ...


6

If you repeat the measurement a little later or after more shaking and the head pressure is still the same then you have achieved equilibrium and you can assumption about the volumes based on measured temp and PSI are indeed correct. If the pressure has dropped then the beer is still absorbing CO2, add more and keep going. BTW: This is the coolest thing I ...


5

A table like that will show you the volumes of CO2 when the beer and headspace have reached equilibrium. If you only had the beer pressurized for a couple hours, the CO2 may not have fully dissolved. If you check the pressure later and it's stable at 22.5 PSI, that means it's at equilibrium (and has about 2.7 volumes of CO2). If the pressure has gone down, ...


4

You might just need more time. I usually let mine go for 7-10 days total before. 5 days seems a little short to me even with your 30PSI upfront charge.


3

I've seen a couple of pages now that list numbers on the milage of a 5 lb tank. From what I gather you can carbonate 5-7 5 gallon corny kegs with a 5 lb tank. You can serve 15-22 5 gallon kegs with a 5 lb tank. Links on how many kegs you can force carbonate with a 5 lb tank: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/how-much-co2-force-carbonate-333455/ ...


3

Yes, you can achieve this at home - I often serve these thick-headed beers. In addition to a keg of homebrew, you also need a Stout faucet and a tank of beer gas. Stout Faucet The stout faucet directs the beer through restrictor ring comprising half a dozen tiny holes. This agitates the beer and causes the CO2 to come out of solution as lots of very ...


3

I think that it was served and conditioned like a cask beer from your description. Generally a cask beer is primed rather than force carbed and served via gravity rather than being pushed out with CO2, which could be absorbed by the beer. That sounds like what you did.


2

You have multiple effects at work here: For one, the carbonation is about absorbing CO2 into the beer. This process lowers the CO2 pressure in the keg. The second point is, that while cooling the beer and the tank, you make the beer able to absorb more CO2, while also reducing the volume of the gas - both in the keg and in the tank. That will lead to a ...


2

Its likely the decrease in perceived pressure as the tank is chilling in the fridge.


2

You can go from uncarbonated in the fermenter to carbonated in the keg in about 15 minutes. The key is agitation. Just the other day I witnessed a guy take a batch that had been cold-crashed, racked it to the keg, agitated, and served properly carbonated beer in 30 minutes (we had an issue with racking, so took a bit longer). Basically, you turn on the ...


2

I've had success with 32-25F beer set to 30PSI for 24-36 hours. You can cut that time down if you are willing to occasionally roll the keg on the floor while you are charging it. After 36 hours, bleed the pressure down to serving (11-14 PSI depending) and pour a glass. It will blow off a fair bit of the carbonation into the head foam, so the beer will be a ...


2

I do this too for some beers when I'm in a hurry. By using 30psi your friend is getting CO2 into the beer quickly - the higher pressure and shaking helps the CO2 enter the beer faster than it does with the usual "hook-up and leave" method. If the beer is at room temperature, then you typically don't overcarbonate because the saturation point at 30psi is ...


2

My money is on a leak somewhere in your system, because the steps you have taken would have DRASTICALLY OVERCARBED a beer. Did you hear gas flowing when you were doing this and/or the beer sloshing with a sound like mouthwash in your mouth? If so, I would put even more money on a leak. FWIW, if needing to quickly carb in a keg, I hook up the CO2 (to a ...


2

A few comments. I've done this many times with success, although not with precision accuracy (you can see my latest question about controlling the precise carbonation level) where i have carbonated beer in about 48 hours. I usually hit my keg with 25 psi while rocking for 4-5 minutes then let it sit for 8 hours with the gas and bev lines detached. After ...


2

The only time I had liquid enter my line was when I had the gas tube on the bottom, keep the gas tube at the top when you rock and roll and you'll be fine.


2

My 5 pound CO2 tank has always sat at about just under 1000 PSI for the reading on the tank pressure until it gets to almost empty. That's at a room temp in the 70's. When you had that 500 to 400 PSI drop, over how much time was that and also, did you do the shaking the keg method to quickly force carbonate during that time or did you just turn on gas at ...


2

The carbonation process shouldn't matter with respect to your altitude. Inside your keg is a closed system. So the same rules of temperature and pressure applied will get you the same volumes of CO2. The rate at which the beer 'de-carbs' in the glass IS effected by your altitude however. So if you find that the beer is getting too flat to quickly, well ...


2

The regulator will give you a reading of the pressure inside the keg, but will not release the pressure the way a spunding valve would -- you'll have to do that manually.


2

It depends on the surface area exposed (and whether you are shaking the keg). For the short corny's I've seen, the diameter is the same as a 20L, so the you have the same surface area for half as much beer when the keg is standing. So half the time should work if you're not shaking it. To carbonate in 10 minutes I suspect you're holding the keg sideways ...


1

Bottling from a tap is always tough, as you tend to lose carbonation. That is why beer guns and counter pressure bottle fillers were made. If you'd like to fill a bottle without one of the above items, I'd recommend using a length of 5/16" hose attached to your tap. This will allow you to fill your bottles from the bottom up (not top down) and will help ...


1

You can also carbonate faster using a carbonation stone. You can buy one ready made online, or make one yourself, or attach a piece of beer line tubing to the gas in tube with a clamp and attach a carbonation stone to the other end, again with a clamp. I like using a plastic clamp for the end with the stone since it's sitting in the beer. Sanitize everything ...


1

Injecting gas into the beer out line makes little difference - the size of the bubbles are not small enough to dissolve any significant amount of gas, so they just float to the top and become part of the headspace just as if you'd used the gas in line. One way to speed up carbonation is to first chill the keg to 41F/5C or cooler, and set the CO2 regulator ...


1

There are many small things at play, but only one major difference. When you bottle from a keg, the CO2 level in the keg will be higher than that in the bottle. You lose some CO2 during bottling. (The higher the number of volumes, the more you'll lose ... also, the higher the temps the more CO2 lost). When bottling for competition this is even truer - but ...


1

You should have a pretty good pressure buildup to stop liquids from coming up the line; although that won't stop excessive shaking from overwhelming the pressure in the gas line. Odds are you have a directional flow valve on your regulator, so you don't have to worry about gas being pushed back. You probably shook the bottle of water hard enough to ...


1

There's not problem leaving the stone in during serving, other than that it's not available to carb other beers. You can still achieve the needed pressure in the headspace to keep the beer properly carbonated. If you're happy with the taste of your beer with your current beer line, then use that to attach the carbonation stone. As far as I know, most ...


1

Since you have not told us exactly what hose type you have, I cannot tell if it is foodsafe, but I don't think you need a pressure safe hose, since the pressure difference should not be great. I guess you could leave the stone in, but I doubt it will get better by doing so. I would try to transfer the beer to another keg when you are done with carbonation ...


1

Pressure will attempt to equalize. By that I mean if you have one container with PSI of 10 and a PSI of 15 in another, then pressure will become 12.5 in both containers. In doing so, the contents (beer) will end up traveling to the vessel of lower pressure (the CO2 regulator) from the vessel of higher pressure (the keg).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible