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10

Headspace in the carboy is nice to avoid this, but ultimately, a blow-off tube is the answer. By switching out the airlocks, you did the right thing, and ultimately, as long as you didn't let it sit exposed for a long period of time (in the realm of 20+ minutes), the likelihood of infection isn't high. Plus, the krausen (foamy stuff that sits on top of the ...


9

Crystal malts add both head retention and body to the beer, they do this by adding dextrines and complex proteins. The crystal or caramel malts are produced by kilning the grains with up to 50% moisture content in the barley creating a crystalline sugar structure inside the grain's hull. They are undermodified malt and have very little diastatic power due ...


7

Do nothing. That lacing is the residue of the foamy, yeasty head (krausen) clinging to the sides of the jug. There's no need to reincorporate it. Just let the cider finish fermenting.


7

One of three things: Incomplete fermentation prior to bottling... If the beer wasn't completely done before bottling residual sugar (plus priming sugar) is over carbonating the beer. Too much priming sugar. Re-examine how much you used. Consider that if the beer was significantly cool prior to bottling that a fair amount of CO2 would have been already ...


6

Is your hydrometer calibrated (use distilled water at 70 degrees, should read 1.00)? Based on your readings, your yeast worked to 86% apparent attenuation ((44-6)/44). That is a pretty solid fermentation, so give yourself a pat on the back for giving them a good environment to work in. Sounds like you aerated well and pitched at the right temp. Do you ...


6

According to your recipe you're at 1.052 estimated OG. According to the Mr. Malty calculator that @baka posted, you'd want 2 smack-packs to get to the recommended amount of yeast. So yes, you probably under-pitched, and that's why you're seeing a lag in yeast activity. However, you don't need to panic. It can take 24-72 hours to see signs of ...


6

You can try filling the tube up to (or at least close to) the top, so that when you lower the hydrometer, most of the foam spills over the edge. Once it's that high up, it's not too hard to blow most of the remaining foam off. Don't forget though to give the hydro a dunk and spin to dislodge any bubbles stuck to the bottom of the hydrometer from an ...


5

Don't worry about the foam, as far as I remember Charlie Tally, Head Chemist at 5 Star, has said that the starsan is broken down by the yeast. Also, when you fill the bottle most of the foam comes out as a "StarSan Worm", so there's relatively little left in the bottle. If you've not had any problems with head in your beer then your existing methods are ...


5

A healthy fermentation with a strong yeast will tend to produce a larger krausen. You're right about the strain of yeast being a big player, but the best thing you can do is increase your fermentor head space. In this case, the obvious answer is best: either use a larger carboy or smaller volume of wort. You can also get a little help by fermenting cooler ...


5

Freezing and thawing tends to force CO2 out of solution, but relax - the beer is probably fine. You should be able to remix the ice and beer after everything is thawed, and readjust your carbonation with no trouble. The beer should taste the same after your carbonation issue is fixed. RDWHAHB! And yes, the foam is likely a result of heating. For a given ...


4

1 smack pack in a barleywine, you say? I've found that bigger beers tend to have longer lag times before the yeast get going, and unless you made a sizable starter, the yeast are going to have to work even harder. If you didn't make a starter, it wouldn't hurt to pitch more yeast. It will probably also help to aerate/oxygenate again. You're generally ...


4

Sounds like a vigorous, but otherwise normal fermentation. Rack to secondary, if that's your process, or leave it in the carboy for another week or two before bottling. The krausen residue on the walls of the carboy won't affect the final beer. In the future you might consider using a blow-off tube instead of an airlock.


4

One possibility is uneven blending of the beer and priming sugar solution. Did you mix the sugar/water solution yourself, or just let it mix naturally from the beer being racked on top? Depending upon how viscous it is, it can sit at the bottom of the fermenting bucket even though the beer is swirling. This means you end up with some bottles undercarbonated, ...


4

Sounds like a normal healthy fermentation. You did nothing wrong. In the future you could get a piece of sanitized tubing larger enough to fit in the opening of the carboy and jam it in there. Then direct all that foam into a pitcher or bucket of water at the side of the carboy. That's called a blow off. But what you did was fine. Once the foaming ...


4

I get the same kraeusen when using liquid yeast - it's not from hydration shock. In fact, the dead yeast that don't survive hydration simply fall to the bottom of the fermentor. The reason for the kraeusen is the constant churning of the wort during active fermentation, which mixes proteins, tannins and hop-alpha acids to create the structure for the ...


3

Sometimes when opening a beer to early after bottling, it will foam, and taste flat. Especially when you have high carbonation. 5 oz in 5 gallons equals a co2 volume of 2.9 which is quite high for an american ale. When I bottle my belgian ales I usually have a carbonation around 3. These will foam if opened too early but after a few weeks they will have a ...


3

While @tallie's overflow answer is excellent, you can also just wait. I take my sample into a footed hydrometer test jar. Set it aside and do other brewery things while the foam settles.


3

That looks like yeast that is sitting on top of a foam (krausen) that was produced by more yeast. I assume you poured dry yeast directly into the fermenter? All it means is that some of it clumped up top instead of sinking down. The rest took over quickly and have been happily munching away. A worst case scenario is the yeast was old and some of it had ...


2

In my experience, a kettle addition of Fermcap does not eliminate the need for it in the fermenter. If you need it there, you have to add more.


2

The excess foam is because there's too much pressure. There are two things I would try. The first is easy - turn off the CO2 and let the pressure in the keg push the beer out. If the sanke coupler has a release valve, you can use that to bleed off the excess CO2.* Once you have released the pressure and your problem should go away. Once it goes down, turn ...


1

Yes, you're fine. No, don't xfer to a secondary...at least not yet. You probably don't need a secondary at all. A lot of brewers have found that it's unnecessary. If you decide you want to xfer, give it at least 3 weeks in primary first. There's nothing wrong with leaving it in there that long.


1

In addition to the comments regarding pressure (which I agree is the most likely cause; Even if you've turned down the pressure, the actual pressure in the keg won't go down until it's released through the tap or a relief valve), I'd also ask what the conditions of your beer line are. The line & faucet should be cleaned regularly with cleaner (something ...


1

Just making my first batch. Filled the first Carboy up too much. Used a racking tube through the bung and attached plastic siphone tube to that and ran it into sanitizer container. Working like a charm.


1

Scott's answer is correct. And I've done this as well, both on my last batch, and the previous one (in which it actually overflowed twice). The blowoff tube is the best approach; I misplaced mine, so I had to do without, and like yourself, I just changed it out and went along my way. You could prevent this all-together by leaving more headroom in the ...


1

FWIW ... I used to make root beer from scratch, using either champagne or ale yeast for carbonation. SWMBO used to open the bale-top bottles with a bit too much of a flourish, and they would gush every time. I would open them very gently, very slowly, with no problem. So I had to train her to take it easy, because it seemed obvious to me that popping the ...


1

Perfectly normal for bubbling to stop and foam to drop at this point. I'd leave it in primary at least a week and then rack it secondary. Cheers!


1

Get a refractometer. The advantages are many, and include the fact the foam and carbonation are irrelevant to the reading. Lots of cheap ones available on eBay.


1

for the most accurate reading, it's always good to gas off some of the co2 by pouring the beer from glass to glass a few times and then filling the hydrometer all the way to the top so the foam overflows, as Tallie says.


1

I just pour the sample between two containers a few times and the gas dissipates. Its not like the beer is really carbonated, so it goes flat with a little disturbance. Make sure you taste it too:D!


1

I'm using a turkey baster to extract my wort/beer, I always slowly drain the beer out into the plastic hydrometer cylinder to decrease the amount of foam. I always like to give it time to sit and get to room temp, this should give it time to de-gas. I also like to take a test sample when it's warmer for a better idea of the flavor.



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