Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

You are doing absolutely nothing wrong. Many people are far too quick to drink their precious homebrew and most beers benefit a lot from aging. A few months for ales and simple lagers. Beers with a high ABV should be aged much longer. I make a Chimay Grand Cru clone that I typically don't try for 4-6 months. Aging remove a lot of the "hot" taste from ...


13

Chez, you're in luck. I just wrapped up a double 1-gallon experiment with these two malts. Had the brew-bug one day & two 55 pound sacks of malt. My experiment was simple. I made gallon batches of 1.040 OG beer solely from each malt. Hopping was kept to a single 60 minute addition of about 20 IBUs. I selected a clean ale yeast and fermented cool to ...


13

Here is a pretty useful chart of different types of hops and the flavors they tend to impart on beer. http://zekeshore.com/hops_v1.12.png Things change depending on year and growing location, as well as hop style, but this is a good general idea.


12

When calculating sugars used in the wort, how much sugar does honey contain? Is it closer to dry malt extracts, raw cane sugar, dextrose? Honey is loaded with fermentable sugar (think mead...), though not as much as malt extracts. There are "adjuncts" within the honey as well. But you can yet a near-even yield from honey as you could from dry ...


11

Attenuation is a measurement of a beer's drop in specific gravity during fermentation. It is expressed as a percentage of original gravity and calculated by (OG - FG) / OG. We measure apparent attenuation because the alcohol produced during fermentation is lighter than water meaning OG readings are not truly measurements of the sugars in beer. Most often ...


11

There could be a few things going on: High Alcohols can improve in flavor after some time in cool, dark storage Sediment can drop out of beer after long, cool storage leading to better head formation and retention (since the sediment is no longer there to form a big nucleation site) Yeast in the beer, if still active, could be cleaning up some byproducts ...


10

In short, it depends. The April 10th, 2008 episode of Basic Brewing Radio is all about glass and skunking. How Fast? Unprotected beer will rapidly skunk. I had a keg of blonde ale in the sun one summer afternoon. The beer in the three feet of tubing spoiled in less than a minute. The small volume of skunky beer was strong enough to ruin an entire pint. ...


10

Based on a standard Pilsner Malt, for Vienna the barley gets watered some more (44-46% water instead of 42-46%). Also the roasting is slightly higher at 90°C instead of 80-85°C. Munich is made with still more water (up to 47%) and temepratures up to 110°C. Water and higher temperatures lead to a more pronounced Maillard-Reaction and hence formation of darker ...


10

Per its name, Citra is also a good citrus-y variety. If you want to know what it adds, compare a Sierra Nevada pale ale (Cascade) to a Sierra Nevada Torpedo IPA (dry-hopped with Citra).


9

The oils in the bean are soluble in alcohol. Temperature probably won't affect the process much The more surface area the additive has, the faster & more complete the process will be (chop it up or leave it longer for more vanilla flavor) Can't say about the question of caviar v. skin. Maybe taste each part to get an idea of what they will impart to ...


9

There's probably a reason you haven't heard of people using either kiwi or papaya in brewing. Kiwi, papaya, pineapple, melon, and fig all contain enzymes (proteases) that affect proteins. Harold McGee's On Food and Cooking treats this subject. Papaya has long been used as a meat tenderizer, albeit an imperfect one. The McGee piece addresses mainly these ...


8

How To Brew by John Palmer contains a good summary of common off flavours: http://www.howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-2.html


8

http://bayareabrewing.com/category/homebrew/10/ Theory A hopback is a sealed chamber into which you put whole leaf hops. Hot wort exits the kettle, passing through the hopback before chilling. Like whirlpool additions, the hops contribute volatile aroma compounds that would normally evaporate in the boil. The leaf hops also filter hot break, helping to ...


8

What you're tasting is the distinct flavor of west-coast hops. Most people liken it to a citrus, grapefruit, or sometimes orange peel aroma and flavor. You might be getting guava from the combination of tangy hops and a sweet, sugar-cookie base from the malt. Racer 5 uses Centennial, Chinook, Cascade, and Columbus hops. I've heard that Islander IPA uses ...


8

I vote for ageing, 45 IBUs isn't that bitter, and the bitterness will round out over time. It's more important that you nail down if this is how it should have turned out, or if there was a process problem, so you can avoid doing the same again in future. Are you accustomed to drinking IPAs? I remember my first which was around 45 IBUs, and thought it was ...


7

I'd follow the recommendation for a clean lager. You want to taste the off flavors enough to be able to recognize them, and an ale might cover up what you're looking for. A friend who went to Siebel tells me that they used MGD there. I just finished teaching a BJCP study group and we did off flavors both with the recommendations in the study guide and ...


7

Cascade hops have a grapefruit aroma, and Amarillo, orange. Those are the stronngest citrussy hops I know of. I'd imagine you get most of the citrus flavour & aroma out of large amounts of late-boil, finishing, and dry hops.


7

Add it at bottling or kegging. The flavoring does not need to sit for a prolonged period if you do not add too much so adding it to the secondary would be redundant. The time in the bottles to carbonate should be plenty of time to get what you are looking for. A tip for the amount to add: Take a 1/2 pint and drop some of the flavoring in and taste, add a ...


6

I can only answer the first part of your question. The sugars in honey vary depending on the type. If you really want to know the contributions you should make a measurement. Specific gravity is a measure of points per pound per gallon (ppg). All you need do is take a pound of honey, add pure water until you have a gallon and measure with a hydrometer. ...


6

Whenever possible I like to use Oregon Fruit Purees. These purees come in large cans that have been flash pasturized already. The fruit is also in a puree format so there is not additional prep and fruit to wort contact is superior to slicing and dicing the fruit. Also for seeded fruits like strawberries and blueberries, much of the seed material has been ...


6

Not all beer matures at the same rate, and not all beer drinkers have the same tastes. For some examples, I like to drink really hoppy beers while they're fairly young and the hops are still vibrant. An altbier I'll cold condition for a couple months. Something like a tripel I prefer with maybe a month or 2 of age on it. The best thing to do is ...


6

For how much coffee to use, check out the recent "Can You Brew It" where they tried to clone Terrapin's Wake-n-Bake stout. They worked from the exact recipe as given to them by the brewer at Terrapin. You can even buy the same blend of coffee they use commercially, if that interests you. I just listened to it this week because I also have a big stout ...


6

A rich nutty flavor comes from a combination of a little roast/toasted malt and some biscuity strong malty notes. You get roasted/toasted from things like toasted malt, pale chocolate or chocolate malt (used in moderation). You can get the malt/biscuit thing from munich malts, and biscuit/victory malt. (Granted biscuit and munich don't taste the same, but I ...


6

DorkRawk, Some 'adjuncts' (vanilla, coffee, juniper, other alcohols) can be added to the end of the boil but I would say most adjuncts should be separately sanitized, pastuerized, or boiled and then added to secondary after transfer from primary rather than added to the end of the boil. Vanilla extract in particular would experience significant boil-off if ...


6

I think you are missing some information. First of all, often what works for commercial brewing doesn't necessarily apply to the homebrew scale; and trying to replicating may have little to no meaningfully positive effect on the beer. Second, the reason pro kettles are covered is because they are being directly vented outside to prevent the brewery from ...


5

Why settle for just one? Try tainting several types of beers. Start by adding the off-flavors to an ounce or two of light lager, in medium-small doses, and identify how they change the beer's nose and taste. After that, you can repeat with an amber, or go even darker to see if you can still perceive the different off-flavors. Commercial beers are ...


5

Considering that hops are from the same family (Cannabaceae) as marijuana and hemp, that's not as outrageous as it may seem. Summit hops in particular, have an intensely 'weedy' aroma. I had an all Summit IPA shortly after the hop was introduced and it smelled (and tasted a bit) like bong water.


5

I have done this with good results in the past. There is no reason at all to not try yeast combinations. Yeast is just another ingredient for the most part. Combining two strains to get a little of both character certainly adds complexity to the brew. I have found that when combining something like WLP001 with other strains, you can tone-down the other ...


5

I've seen a great picture of an oak table leg sticking out the top of a carboy. Wish I could find it. BYO covered this question in depth. So I won't plagiarize everything here. Oak Essence and Powder Oak Chips Oak Cubes Staves and Spirals


5

The bacon flavor could be coming from a couple of different things but it would be hard to pinpoint exactly without a sample. Here are a few things it could be. The first thing is that you can get a smoky flavor from the chocolate malt, the roasted barley, and other dark roasted grain, this happens when you use a larger percentage of these dark grains in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible