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12

Absolutely nothing to worry about. A few notes: Active fermentation can certainly die down after 2-3 days. Airlock bubbles can indicate active fermentation. A lack of airlock bubbles does not necessarily indicate a lack of active fermentation. CO2 is sneaky - it can get out a lot of places besides through your airlock liquid. 70F is getting on the warm ...


9

Assuming that your 1.004 was a typo, and you meant 1.040, you've gotten around 75% apparent attenuation, so the yeast are probably finished, and you should be able to bottle. Unfortunately, 26C is about 16C too warm for a lager, so you may have an odd tasting lager. It won't necessarily taste bad, but it won't match the style that you were attempting.


6

Your first batch can be terrifying. You have nothing to compare to, and people are giving you conflicting advice. It's like driving at night with the lights off.... except... This is beer. What you have there is probably beer, or well on its way, and not needing of your help. It's probably drinkable, or will be at some point. Here's some thoughts: The ...


5

Take really good notes so you can correct next time for things that don't work out this time.


5

26C is about 79F. That is way too hot. I bet the brew finished while you were sleeping on the first night. Its ready to bottle, so go for it.


4

One week is Usually enough time to finish carbonating, however I've found that you get much better results if you wait at least two weeks. Bottle bombs are typically the result of one of three things Incomplete Fermentation Infection Too much bottling sugar If you made sure fermentation was complete, had no signs of infection and made sure you used the ...


3

Seeing how your pot doesn't really seem to be large enough to do what you propose, I would add 4 gallons of water and start heating it. Once you get it hot enough to dissolve the DME, I'd add that in and see ho wmuch room you have left. A measuring stick of some sort would help here to see it now you are at 4.5 gallons or 5 gallons. The DME will take up ...


3

The yeast could be old. Sometimes those off the shelf kits can be really old, but all the ones I am familiar with come with dry yeast and those packs should be good for over a year, unless the pack got super hot, or a bad batch of yeast, etc. Other potential issues with a higher finish gravity could be: the yeast isn't finished, so allow more time before ...


3

Munton's beer kits always make light beers. They're not bad, but you have to add some more extracts on your own in order to have a good result. You can see that clearly by comparing the munton kits with the brewferm kits: while they use about the same amount of malt extract, munton's suggests you use it for about double the wort quantity brewferm does. ...


3

I have no experience with Munton's extracts. However, after a little research, I see two potential problems. Not enough fermentables Since you didn't have a hydrometer to measure the OG with I have to speculate. The can of extract weighs 1.8 kg which, if it is a typical liquid malt extract, should yield 5 gallons of 1.029 wort (reference). You mentioned ...


3

There sounds like a lot of variables here, any one of which could have resulted in characteristics you describe. Here are a few tips for your next batch. Don't give up, you will be surprised how much better your next batch is. Pay close attention to the liquid volumes. Pre-mark the inside of the bucket with a sharpie. If you followed the instructions and ...


2

Ditto what PJ and dzachareas said about the mash temps, recirculating, and sparging slowly. Probably the most important aspects. Also, I'd add that if you haven't already been using them, irish moss/whirfloc and a wort chiller are essential if you don't want to get chill haze. Need to have a good solid (fast) cold break at the end of the boil.


2

Keep a steady eye on your temperature throughout your mash. Raise the mash temp to 168 before sparging with 168 degree water. Do a nice slow sparge, and start it by vorlaufing (cycling the water through the grain bed) before sparging. I'm sure there are a few other things to watch like your water water to grain ratio, I use 1.25 qts/lb usually, but I just ...


2

First, temperature of the mash. Second, gravity. This will help you determine a lot of things, like if you need to boil down / add water.


2

If after you check the gravity you truly are "stuck" the appropriate steps are to warm it up some and rouse the yeast. To do this, I'd move the fermenter to a warmer spot for a day to ensure its a little warmer than where you were fermenting. If you can get it to 75F that would be fine. Then I would gently introduce a sanitized spoon or something deep ...


2

Could be a lot of factors at play here, but lacking a hygrometer to take an initial gravity reading is likely a big factor here. What was your final gravity? Adding water is a non-issue from this condensed-wort brewer. I just recently picked up a 7.5 gallon brew kettle, and for the past 5 or so years have been using a 2-3 gallon boil with top-off to 5 ...


2

Excellent advice has already been given. I would only add, take your time, don't rush, start as early as you can so you don't feel pressured by time. And, like the carpentry adage of 'measure twice, cut once', check everything carefully - though, sometimes, mistakes can produce surprisingly good results! Enjoy!


2

If you're using coolers for HLT or MLT - make sure they have been at room temperature for a significant amount of time before using them. Sadly, I once made this rookie mistake, which made it very difficult to hit the correct temperatures...


2

I would also check your fermentation setup. The first batch I did I did not notice any activity in my airlock, turned out that the lid had not been seated 100%and co2 was leaking out of the lid instead of the airlock.


2

Though I admire your efforts tremendously, wouldn't it be easier to go with a more straightforward recipe for your 1st non-kit brew? Just my opinion, but it might help you hone your skills. Vanilla, Coffee, Oatmeal, Milk? All in the same brew? Why not just start with an Oatmeal Stout first?


2

You don't want to boil the grains, that will make the beer very harsh and astringent (like tea that has stewed too long.) Looks like you got it backwards - start at 165°F to steep the grains, then remove the grains and then turn on the heat bring the liquid to a boil. You need to steep both the grains and oats in hot water - so that the whole mixture ...


2

Probably there's no infection. Even though the airlock was mostly dry, there shouldn't have been a way for rhe flies to get into the carboy. The liquid in the airlock evaporates over time, and vodka will evaporate faster that water. You should check the airlock every few weeks and top up (without removing from the carboy) when required. Fruit flies carry ...


1

Don't forget that you'll need headspace for the hot break, otherwise you'll be risking a boilover. Especially if you're not quick with a skimming device and able to easily control the heat right at pre-boil (remember that electric eyes will carry over a bit). You might be better off aiming for a 4 gallon batch size or doing a more concentrated boil and ...


1

Yeah, the fermentation temp was way too high. Bubbles don't really tell you much. It's the gravity that matters. I'd say at 1.010 you're done and ready to bottle, but that depends on your recipe and the style of beer, also.


1

If the specific gravity has gone up, the beer has not fermented. I recommend taking a sanitized spoon, getting a bit of the wort, and tasting it. If it tastes sour or bad, throw it out. If it tastes sweet, put a new packet of yeast in it and try again. If all goes well, the wort should start bubbling about a day after you add the yeast, and bubble vigorously ...


1

Before you do anythin take a hydrometer reading. The airlock is only an indicator and just because it is not bubbling it does not mean it is fermenting. ALWAYS TRUST THE HYDROMETER


1

In my first few batches I quickly learned that something doesn't go exactly right in almost every batch. Should be fine unless you have reason to believe you may have poisoned the beer. In my few short years homebrewing, I have yet to toss a batch or make one that is totally undrinkable. You've learned two important lessons. 1. Be careful with your ...


1

Since the hydrometer only broke in the sanitizing bucket, you're almost certainly fine. Boiling over, from my understanding, is going to happen to everyone from time to time. As far as the hydrometer, if you didn't get an OG calculation, you can always go to beercalculus.com and enter the recipe you used. It will give you an approximate OG based on your ...


1

When you broke your hydrometer, where was it? Any chance there could be glass in your wort? That would be my only concern right now. (I've been there, kinda. One of my homebrew buddies broke a thermometer with some sort of metal weights it in during our boil, ugh).



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