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0

I'd usually wait at least a week for conditioning and clearing. The top tap may reduce the time taken to clear the top layer, but you likely want to leave at least a week to allow the flavours to mellow.


6

Unless you were planning on heating the juice itself to a high enough temperature to kill anything in it, it's not really going to matter. Any bacteria or wild yeasts present on the inside of the carboy will also be in the juice itself already. If the juice is labeled as having been pasteurized, then it and its container are probably reasonably sanitary ...


0

I have seen a lot of times that there is a layer of protection, when the ferment is going strong, the pressure of the bubbles actually push any contaminants out of the stopper hole. The layer of foam created by the ferment is also a protection from contaminants. My airlock had the ferment bubbling into the airlock, so I had to take it off and clean it, and ...


0

You shouldn't be concerned. When you removed the stopper, you didn't allow it to come into contact with a non-sterile (potentially bacteria-ridden) surface, so there was no potential for transfer of bacteria onto it (other than contact with the air, which does not pose a significant risk).


1

Move to a cold country and leave the kegs outside. :p I have a chillplate that I put into my fridge. I store the keg and CO2 on the one side of the fridge, beerline goed into the fridge, through the chill plate and out the other side to a mounted tap. Works like a dream. * I have NOT tested the system in the heat of summer (35C), but so far it is working ...


5

As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time.


3

No, you don't need to worry about contamination based on what you describe.


4

Keep an eye on Craigslist for a used refrigerator. You can often get them free or nearly free if you pick it up. That's all you need: take the shelves out, and you can keep your keg in there with a picnic tap. I did this for about 15 years in my basement. If you want to get fancy, you could get a kit to put a faucet through the side so you don't have to open ...


0

Denny's answer is pretty accurate, I think. After fermentation is mostly complete, the beer is fairly resistant to infection. Regarding what post-fermentation additions people do, the answer is LOTS! Dry-hopping, fruit additions, vanilla, chocolate, wood, liquor, chili peppers, and coffee are all pretty common. I'm sure that I'm leaving out some other ...


3

Basically, you don't need to worry about it. I add coffee beans without any sanitation at all. I've even added unsanitized mushrooms right out of the woods without problem. By the time you add that stuff, there's not only alcohol n the beer, but it has a low pH. Those two things combine to make it very resistant to infection.


1

Looks pretty reasonable, although as Ryan noted, 2 oz. Columbus at 60 minutes will be quite bitter. Personally, I find that boiling Columbus for more than 30 minutes results in a harsh bitterness that lingers far too long on my tongue. (I wake up tasting it the next day.) For that reason, I no longer use Columbus for bittering. I generally stick with Magnum ...


2

These yeast started out with a similar roots s.cerevisiae and diverged some time around the 15th Century, when it is thought to have hybridized with a new world yeast(Saccharomyces eubayanus). It is then likely that the yeast harvesting methods of different brewing techniques progressively selected for more specific varieties. In British and similar ...


3

Hey experimenting is half the fun of brewing! If you keep good notes on recipes and final product you can really start to understand what works together and produce better and better beer. Without knowing what your grain bill I would say this looks a little aggressive. As a reference, let's say you were shooting for a 1.065 o.g. (6.5% ish) your current hop ...


0

They are two different species: Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces pastorianus. They both do the same thing--convert sugar into alcohol--but they thrive in different conditions. The main difference is that lager yeasts continue to function at almost-freezing temperatures, while ale yeasts go dormant. The terms 'top-fermenting' and ...


2

I cold crash (and fine with gelatin) at 30F for two or three days before kegging. I have found that 30F for two days clears my beer better than weeks at 38F in my refrigerator. If you plan to bottle the beer, you might fear that you'll drop too much yeast out, leaving you with too little yeast to carbonate the beer. That isn't a concern. Plenty of beer has ...


2

Yes. You'll likely be fully fermented within 1 week, if you have a healthy pitch of yeast. Two weeks should be more than enough. Gravity readings are your best option to understanding fermentation/attenuation, here.


4

In my opinion a "secondary" should be viewed as a tool. A potentially useful tool, but best used by someone who really has a grip of their brewing process and using it for a very specific purpose. I agree with Palmer, dont chase what the big brewers do, they have different issues then homebrewers. I would definitely suggest dry hopping in your primary vessel ...


4

It's not contradictory so much as it's all valid. :) To answer the titular question: yes, you can dry-hop in primary. Long-term aging is really the only reason to rack to secondary. Dry-hopping, fruit additions, &c. can all happen in primary just fine. Anything that happens w/in 6 months can happen in one vessel (primary) or two (primary and secondary). ...



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