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4

Nope. Beer will fight very hard to be beer. :) Your beer will not taste exactly like planned, but if it is bubbling then you are off to a good start. Kolsch uses a lager yeast and they are happy with the colder temps. As the beer warms up the yeast will also warm up and work faster, but keep the temps reasonable! A lower amount of water will mean that ...


3

For a ten gallon batch, you'll probably want to have about 11 gallons of wort at the end of the boil to account for kettle losses (dead space, break material, hops). If you figure you'll boil off roughly a gallon per hour and you might want to be able to do a 90 minute boil sometimes, your kettle will need to hold an additional 1.5 gallons. That puts you at ...


2

The best solution would be to try and direct the wild fermentation into a controlled one. The strange smell ("smells like goat" or garlic or bad eggs or rotten meat, depending on whom you ask) that you have may very well be what's called "Böckser" in German and "goût de bock" in French. I'm not aware of an English translation other than off-flavour. It ...


1

You can use Campden tablets (Potassium or Sodium Metabisulfite) or equivalent product available from your local home brew store, dissolved in a little water (and a bit added to each bottle), to inhibit wild yeast if you don't want any alcohol produced. I can't tell you the exact quantity you would need however.


0

Don't worry, this is a relatively minor problem (and a common mistake for new brewers). I do a 90 minute boil on every beer, and strongly believe there is science to back up doing a 90 over a 60 for all beers (not just those using high amounts of pils malt to drive off DMS). However, I still do my 60m. bittering hop addition @ 60m. If your bittering hops ...


1

Wild yeast must have gotten into the bottles, and yeast will ferment any simple sugar solution. Depending how long fermentation has been going you might already have some weird wild yeast-derived off-flavors, but hopefully you're catching this early enough to save the batch I would pasteurize them in the bottles to kill off the yeast: Place all of the ...


0

Your OG will be higher than expected as you have boiled off a bit more wort than planned. This will... give you more alcohol, which is ok. :) Unfortunately this also means less beer going into the fermenter and less beer going into bottles/kegs. :( Due to boil off your beer will have more body. You may have more caramel/toasty notes due to the prolonged ...


2

Further to the other responses your beer is also likely to be darker than expected due to the longer time for Maillard reaction. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maillard_reaction


1

It's worth noting too (since this is an IPA) that in addition to the added bitterness, you will also lose a small amount of hop aroma from your last three additions. Late-addition hops are meant to go in late enough to minimize loss of volatile aromatic hop oils which are very prone to disappear as they evaporate during the boil. Of course (as already noted) ...


-1

I always boil my IPA for 90 minutes and start the hop additions at the 60 minute mark. This will give you a bit of a toffee character to your beer because the sugars in the wort will caramelize a little more. For some recipes, like a Scotch Ale, I'll take some (a couple of quarts) of my first runnings and boil that while I'm sparging and add it near the ...


6

Absolutely not a problem. You will gain just a bit of extra bitterness by boiling longer, but so little that I doubt you could notice it.


3

Your boil sounds like it is more aggressive than it should be. You should try to achieve a "rolling" boil. I know a lot of brewers keep a spray bottle of water next to their kettle. Spraying the water on the foam will cause it to fall back. Yes, your beer will not be exactly the same as what it could be, but it is not a major issue. Here are some things ...


1

Weyermanns Abbey Malt adds honey flavour and aroma. There are other Honey Malts available, but I have not used them. Add the malt to your mash or do a steep (depending on if your kit is all grain or extract).


0

Honey is 100% sugar and will be entirely consumed by the yeast in your beer. I've made mead a couple times with different varieties of honey. The honey flavor left after the fermentation is a very mild and dry sweetness, nothing like the flavor of raw honey.


3

The beer won't be quite as bitter as expected. Don't give up on it, it may still be a perfectly good beer. Also, preventing boilovers is discussed here: How do you prevent boil-overs?



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