Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Here's a dump of all my "Beer & Homebrewing" subscriptions from Google Reader. If yours is on here and you don't want to be, go ahead and edit it out. If you're is on here and you want to point out that it's yours, go ahead and denote it as such. Most of these are about homebrewing, but a few are about beer in general. If you want to edit those out, ...


8

I would get hold of another sachet of yeast as a backup. If you have a local homebrew store, almost any type of yeast will work for this kit, but I'd recommend Safale US-05 if you can get that, since that will give you a cleaner profile. If they have liquid yeasts, then Wyeast 1056 or White Labs WLP001 will produce equivalent results. Once you've got hold of ...


8

Yes, you should wait. The escaping CO2 will carry off the hop aroma you're trying to get through dry hopping. It's best to remove the beer from the yeast completely before dry hopping. There is an interaction between yeast and hops that can cause the hops to produce a very floral, rose-like ester which can be disagreeable.


7

It sounds like you had a very active fermentation. It is not uncommon for the majority of fermentation to be complete in a few days. Commercial breweries strive for this. HOWEVER, this does not mean that the yeast are done with your beer! Even after fermentation is complete, the yeast will clean up after themselves, reducing things like diacetyl. (which ...


7

Here is a link to an overview of sugars in beer I have brewed with multiple sugars before but never maple and I'm not certain what golden syrup is. Honey is a very common ingredient. In my uses it leaves a mild honey flavor but ferments out almost completely. I've used brown sugar and it adds a sweetness but I personally feel the raw demerara sugar leaves a ...


6

champagne has lots of qualities that contribute to it's taste, so it could be many things, depending upon which part of the champagne taste you are detecting in your beer, but a few things jump to mind excessive fizziness caused by over carbonation yeast death - autolysis is usually present in small amounts in champagne, and this can occur in beer if it ...


6

Your process sounds fine - it's the way you're using the hydrometer that's the problem. To estimate alcohol content, you need to take a reading at the start of fermentation. You cannot read the alcohol content from the hydrometer alcohol scale at the end of fermentation. The hydrometer cannot measure the alcohol content directly, but it can estimate how ...


6

Yes, you can make a concentrated wort and the dilute that after the boil as with extract. The key differences are: lower mash efficiency: higher gravity mashes tend to have lower conversion efficiency. To keep boil volume to a minimum, you might even choose not to sparge, and just use the first runnings - expect conversion efficiency around 50%. More ...


5

Let me try to answer your questions. 1) Modern home brewers use airlocks to minimize the chance that airborne wild yeast or bacteria will populate the beer and produce undesirable characteristics. A brewer chooses a specific yeast strain for their beer because of the particular properties that that yeast strain has been cultured to impart on the beer. The ...


5

A lot of good info here, so I'll just throw in my $0.02 Your techniques when starting out will usually not be optimal. Part of this is because the instructions supplied by kits and shop owners are usually oversimplified to make the process less intimidating. That being said, you usually still wind up making beer, it may just not be the best beer :) The ...


5

You probably just haven't waited long enough yet. Make sure the lid is on tight and wait another 24 hours. Dry yeast and the first time experience tends to take a while for things to start perking. Just be patient. Hot water can be too hot, but as long as it is under 100F you should be OK. Some of the yeast probably didn't survive the shock, but you ...


5

Well the easy answers are this: Light exposure - One assumes that since it's in the basement that won't be a problem. Temperature - Not only ambient temperature, but whether or not the fermentation vessel will be on the concrete, which will leech heat. Type of beer you brew. Lagers and saisons aren't going to get made in the basement closet. :-) Out of ...


5

The basement is a good place to brew as long as the temp is constant and it is dry. However, if you have the means, I recommend finding an older refrigerator or chest freezer to use as a fermentation chamber. Connect an external thermostat and you can have a humidity controlled, temperature controlled, light-free, clean Fermentation chamber anywhere.


5

Boiling serves a few purposes in beer. Mainly it is done for the dual purpose of extracting bitterness from hops while also killing any wild yeast or bacteria that were on the brewing ingredients. In the case of hopped malt extract, the bitterness has already been extracted for you, and the extract itself is totally sterile as its already been boiled down ...


5

Different yeast strains can look a little different in the bottle as well. One characteristic of yeast is how well it "compacts" at the bottom of the fermentor or bottle. Some strains, like English Ale yeasts, are known for creating a very tight, compacted sediment, whereas others leave the yeast cake much more "fluffy". And yes, the yeast caked that you ...


5

When racking from a primary fermenter to a secondary vessel, you will leave behind a non-trivial amount of "stuff" so the volume in the secondary will be less than the volume in the primary. If you start with five gallons in the fermenter you won't have five gallons left to bottle, but it isn't any more concentrated than when you started. If your OG and FG ...


4

Nope, nothing wrong at all! Fermentation can happen fast, especially if you have good pitching rates and oxygenation. I've commonly had fermentations that are done after a day or two, and I'd say on average most of my fermentations are done by day 3. From a fermentation standpoint, everything is great! However, given that the fermentation was so active ...


4

I would guess that it's only partially yeast. The majority of it may be trub that was still in suspension when you bottled. Bottle conditioning will result in yeast in the bottle, but it's unlikely that 1/2 in. of sediment is all due to yeast.


4

First of all, don't open the bucket if you can at all avoid it. I know this your first brew so you're excited, but in general you want to leave it alone. I don't touch my brews for 4 weeks unless dry-hopping (as in, I pitch yeast, close the bucket and don't look or think about it again for a month). Second--your beer is probably fine. The most vigorous ...


4

Seal the beer off from oxygen as soon as possible. If you decide to use the airlock, use sanitized water only. If you have access to CO2, put a layer of the gas over your beer as soon as possible (then close it off). If you've achieved your desired final gravity and you don't need to let it sit in the fermenter any longer, you could also bottle it or keg it ...


3

Did I make a mistake somewhere? Possible reasons for no bubbles: a) The lead of the fermenter is not completely closed, or the airlock not perfectly attached, thus air gets out from somewhere else. b)When you say your poured the yeast into "hot water", how hot was it? If you used water over 80-85 degrees F you could have killed your yeast. How ...


3

If the wort you use is pre boiled (which it sounds like it is), about your only option is to dry hop it. That will give you aroma and a bit of hop flavor, but won't increase the bitterness. Wait until fermentation is finished, then add about an oz. of hops to the fermenter. If you want to keep it British style, use something like Goldings. If you want to ...


3

If you want to add hop bitterness, you can get hold of some dry malt extract (DME) from your local homebrew store. Boil it up with some water, say a gallon, and add 1-2oz of your desired bittering hop and boil for 45 minutes. Add this to the fermenter along with your other pre-boiled wort and top-up water. That will give you the extra hop bitterness you are ...


3

Unfortunately, you may wind up with a cloudy beer. Boiling will have "set" the natural pectin (the stuff that makes jams and jellies thick) in the raspberries. This will likely result in a beer that will never really get bright and clear. Not that I would expect an IPA to be crystal clear anyway, really. When I have added fruit like this to a mead ...


3

I routinely ferment US-05 at 68F and it is still very clean despite others reporting in at 60F. At 70F you'll be fine. US-05 is a great yeast and very versatile across that whole range. In fact, unless you've already really mastered the yeast starter and the proper amount of O2 in your beer, attempting to ferment at 60F will be difficult and likely lead to ...


3

You tagged with first-time-brewer... if this is true, I would caution against making an infused beer right out the gate. Fancy beers can be a tricky proposition. That said, my best guess is that you could do an infusion similar to using vanilla, since it seems like a similar plant. See this question & answers about vanilla. There's some discussion ...


3

I asked a while back on adding peppers and was given a link to an excellent article on adding chillies to beer. I went with the dry hopping technique, and used chipotle peppers instead of the original plan of jalapenos or habaneros because I wanted the smokey flavor and I was not at all disappointed by the outcome. In fact, I loved it. I want to do it ...


3

You pitched really warm - 30°C is well above what is recommended - you can expect a lot of fruitiness and maybe some stronger alcohol flavors. It takes many hours for 20 liters of beer to drop to ambient temps, plus as the yeast get started, they create heat, holding the temperature where it is or raising it. The temperature falling to 17°C could ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible