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10

Ideally when using irish moss, very little of it should end up in the fermentor. It's a good idea to let the boil settle for 10-15 minutes after flameout so that the moss and the proteins it's attracted have time to fall to the bottom of the kettle. But even if it does make it to the fermentor, it won't have any significant affect on the yeast: The irish ...


5

I am going to say that you will have plenty of yeast remaining. It may take a little longer for the carbonation to happen, but it will happen. I have left beer in a cold primary for a month at a time before and still got proper carbonation within 2-3weeks post priming.


5

I would not use finings, I like the cloudiness and believe it to be part of the style, I would not use anything to interfere with this.


5

Egg whites have been traditionally used to clarify wine and remove bitter and/or tannic compounds. See the answer to the first question in this article. Wikipedia also mentions egg whites as a traditional fining agent. That being said, you're probably better off using a fining specifically designed to clarify beer. Isinglass, gelatine and bentonite all work ...


5

Easily put, chill haze is the result of haze-producing proteins that reside in the beer. They do not react unless chilled, at which point they clump together. At that point, they become visible enough to reflect light. Since the particulates are white in color, they give the appearance of haze. These proteins are slightly heavier than the beer, so given ...


4

Yes it can take away flavor and aroma. If you really want to keep the beer as fresh and vibrant as possible, then cold crashing is the best option. Not that gelatin is bad - but in my experience it does "round off" some of the flavours, making them less intense. I actually enjoy this, since it reduces the amount of conditioning by a couple of weeks. The ...


3

From these documents: PDF1 PDF2 Store in cool conditions, away from direct sunlight Keep containers sealed when not in use Maximum storage temperature - 30°C Recommended storage temperature - 10 to 15°C Minimum storage temperature - Not applicable The shelf life at the recommended storage temperature is 2 years from date of manufacture Increasing the ...


3

The answer is that the active ingredient, carageenan, is said to denature by hydrolization at low pH (especially if combined with high temps) before it has gelled, but it is hard to find citeable sources on the Internet. Carageenan typically comes from seaweed, including the commonly-named Irish Moss. Most forms of carageenan are not soluble in water at ...


3

The CO2 won't keep the gelatin suspended - it will sink as normal. The CO2 pressure is evenly distributed throughout the keg and applies pressure equally in all directions. There's no more CO2 pressure pushing down than there is pushing up, so Gravity will still produce a downwards force, and the gelatin will sink.


3

Adding finings is a waste of effort with this style when brewed correctly. It is possible to have too much residual haze stuff in the beer and it will be super cloudy, and maybe even chunky. If your normal pale ales are cloudy, maybe finings are a good idea with this wiesse attempt. That said, some people actually add a little flour to the boil late to ...


3

Fining are wonderful, especially on a home brew scale. The majority of them are just organic material, and I don't any reason a normal omnivore would worry. If you refuse to drink beer with isinglass, you shouldn't be eating fish sauce or Worcestershire either:D Some finings like polyclar are plastics, and not FDA approved for consumption. The idea is ...


3

I've kept Whirlfloc for nearly a year and it was still fine. I don't see why you couldn't keep it even longer. Although some people say you don't need it for dark beers, I disagree. Even in a very dark beer you can see it it's clear or not. I use it in every batch. I don't think it's a deal breaker if you don't use it, but based on the times I've ...


3

I view the stripping of flavor and aroma by gelatin (or other finings or practices such as filtering) as a recipe issue not a "should I or shouldn't I" concept. For example, if you want to use gelatin to clarify but you think you've lost some dry hop character; next time you need to up the amount of dry hops. Simple as that. Same can be said for all the ...


3

Egg whites are positively charged, so it will attract negatively charged particulates (e.g. yeast), therefor it should have some degree of success in clarifying your beer after fermentation completes. In order to use egg whites, you have to fully separate the egg white from the yolk (one egg for a 6 gallon batch), add it to a 100 ml of salt water (by adding ...


2

If necessary, yes. However you are not at the point where I would even consider finings. It is by no means necessary to use them unless you are unhappy with some aspect of the clarity of the beer. You can achieve a good result by placing your beer in a cold spot for a week or two to allow the proteins, tannis, and yeast to fall out on their own thus avoiding ...


2

I use whirlfloc in pretty much every brew apart from some wheats where the protein haze is part of the style. Shelf life is about 2 years (see below.) Even though the recipe calls for whirlfloc, you can use either whirlfloc or irish moss, both are kettle finings and contain the same active ingredient - kapa-carrageenan (Wikipedia lists other types and ...


2

The simple, easy way to get rid of chill haze is to cold condition the beer for a couple months.


1

Adding irish moss too early to the boil will actually cause the coagulated proteins to break apart after binding together, negating the purpose of using irish moss. Ten minutes would be fine, but any shorter and you risk not giving the irish moss sufficient time to bind the proteins together. As an aside, adding irish moss will help with clarity, but ...


1

You could try adding some pectolase, mix it up and see if that fixes it. If that doesn't would I would try adding some stronger finings such as the Youngs 2 part sachet. These have never failed me. Failing all of that I suppose the last resort would be to use a wine filter.


1

I liked the simple answer, it was very informative. The most fun way to get rid of chill haze is to pour the home brew into an opaque container, and drink it.


1

If you can get away with unfined and unfiltered and you don't care too much about appearance, quite often the result is fantastic on the flavor end of things. Just like with wine, in the beer world there are people who don't mind cloudiness if they get all the good flavors they want from a beer. With my wine and with my beer, I prefer to go the ...


1

Gelatin may bother vegetarians, since it is an animal product -- made of from the collagen inside animals' skin and bones. Isinglass would have the same problems. Other than that, your question is a bit difficult to answer. What were the specific complaints?


1

I would believe that you would remove too much of the remaining yeast and thus you beer wouldn't properly carbonate. If you did do this you could use a highly flocculant yeast strain at bottling such as Nottingham dry yeast which clears quite quickly. I would suggest using irish moss or whirlfloc tablets to see if that helps with the clarity.



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