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6

Free (or nearly free) Cold Conditioning Before packaging drop the temperature to the thirties or forties Fahrenheit. Hold the beer here for a few days. Haze-causing proteins coagulate more easily at this temperature. I do this for almost all my beer. Wait Longer This is one of the most difficult filtering methods. All that beer, nearly ready to ...


6

You could also use a flocculant in secondary, such as gelatin, isinglass, chitosan, or polyclar (a commercial name for the former). An easier method would be to cold crash the carboy after fermentation - drop the temp of the carboy to about 32 for a few days to drop out yeast and haze.


6

The muslin should let plenty of the yeast through.


6

You just need time. My experience is that making cider requires a schedule more like wine than beer. I usually give my ciders 1-2 months in primary and at least another 3 months in secondary. They turn out crystal clear.


6

It's mostly to achieve a crystal clear presentation, and also because the average consumer expects no sediment in a can or bottle of beer. Also, filtering out the suspended solids improves the flavor of the beer, especially noticeable in light colored beers. Craft brewers that don't filter the beer leave the yeast in suspension so the beer can condition or ...


5

If you do use a bucket for the secondary then you can just keep the whole lot of berries in a muslin bag. Just don't make it too tight so there is enough circulation to impart the flavors. Other than that you may just have to convince yourself that it is an acceptable loss for some great beer.


5

You're right - you need minerals! Different minerals in the brewing water perform a number of roles througout the brewing process: mashing: during the mash, minerals are used to adjust the pH - around 5.2 is considered a comprimise between the pH ranges favored by alpha and beta amylase. Chalk (Calcium Carbonate) and Baking soda (Calcium Hydrogen ...


5

What you describe in your comments sounds like trub (pronounced "troob"). It's mostly yeast, proteins, fats, and sometimes hop material. It's totally normal for that stuff to settle to the bottom of the vessel after fermentation is complete. You don't filter it; you just let it settle and then carefully siphon the beer off while picking up as little of the ...


4

Since you intend to build your water from scratch, I recommend you take a look at Martin Brungard's excellent (and free!) water spreadsheet at https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/ . Not only will it help you to figure out what minerals you need for each beer style, there's a great water tutorial section in it.


4

When I dry hop, I don't use any kind of bag to hold the hops either as I prefer as much exposure as possible. Generally I will agitate the carboy every day or two (just a quick rock back and forth) during the dry hopping phase. The rocking action will break up the "mat" of hops on top and allow them to begin settling out. Using this method, I generally have ...


4

I would use gelatin, isinglass or cold crash. If the apple juice was clear to begin with then the only particulate is the yeast, which you can either leave to settle out, or use finings to cause it to settle out faster. For tips on using gelatin, and other finings, see Fining Agents, improving beer clarity.


4

I think you have the right idea about sealing the rim of your false bottom. The common method is to use a length of vinyl tubing slit lengthwise. The false bottom fits into the slit as you wrap the tubing around it.


3

When making beers that end up with a lot of trub I do this. Go to your local hardware store and buy a paint straining bag (they are usually by the paint sprayers) this bag will fit over a five gallon bucket with an elastic on the top of the bag and the bag fills the bucket to the bottom. (see here http://forum.finevinewines.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=7887 Rack ...


3

http://www.amazon.com/Granulated-Activated-Carbon-1-cu-ft/dp/B0017677O8 You could probably also use the products labeled for treating ponds or fish tanks, since AFAIK it's all the same carbon - usually made from coconut shells. For water filtering, especially if you're using a gravity-feed, look for 12x40 or 8x30 grain sizes. To use it, I would just make ...


3

The hops that were in the kettle really have nothing left to give. There's no benefit to leaving them in.


3

It would remove the break material and other such things, which may or may not have an effect on how long the beer would store if you're planning on aging it. You may also filter out nutrients that the yeast could use if you're doing that, though. Filtering after fermentation makes much more sense to me.


3

my brew pertner & I just did our first dry hopping about 5 weeks ago. We got a tip to use a knee high womens stocking at the end of the syphon. Worked great. Not one speck in any of the bottles. Also, it was our first time using carbonation drops instead of bottling sugar. Have to say, they worked great. We got a clone recipe for Boulder Beers Hazed ...


3

If you are a homebrewer, I would recommend avoiding any sort of filtration when bottling or kegging until you're a very advanced brewer. You will need to force carbonate if you filter. If you are simply trying to get rid of some of the cloudiness, make sure you use a yeast that is not low flocculation (medium is ideal, because highly flocculant yeast might ...


3

Other than cold crashing and maybe filtering (although I haven't heard of anybody who has ever bothered to filter), I don't know of any other techniques. Do you think the cloudiness is from the juice (ie, was it there from the very beginning?) or residual yeast in suspension? Residual yeast is more responsive to cold-crashing, while protein/fruit ...


3

If you are using a grain bag wrapped tightly around the racking tube, it will clog very quickly. Also, flexible tubing draped over a kettle will collapse, or at least narrow, as hot wort is passing through it. You should use a rigid racking cane with a cap on the end that keeps the bottom of the cane raised from the bottom of the kettle by a few millimeters. ...


3

200L? Wow. You might consider using a length of copper tubing with slits cut in it, instead of a false bottom. My mash tun came with a false bottom which was always a bit of a pain to get nicely into place. One day I replaced it with the copper tube thing and I love it! I have since replaced my mash tun with a larger one, but I'm still using the same ...


2

As a matter of practicality, I'd be tempted to screen, not filter, and have in the past. I also use a wort-chiller of the counter-flow variety, and they do not work well with either the break material or floating bits of hops. A standard / fine stainless wire mesh strainer is plenty good enough to keep the chiller from getting clogged with solids of either ...


2

I built a pretty simple filter apparatus using a universal refrigerator filter I found at Lowes. It has 1/4" compression fittings, so I just got the proper hose and adapters to convert to 3/4" compression (garden hose) which I then have a faucet to garden hose adapter, and I just hook it to my faucet and run it into my kettle. cost about $35 total. A lot ...


2

I'm answering my own question with something I just thought up. If you've done this before, please let me know how it worked. My main concern with getting the beer off the fruit is introducing too much oxygen. I just remembered there was an episode of brew strong with guest Dr. Charlie Bamforth talking about preventing oxidative staling in beer. He ...


2

I think the problem is that your fruit to volume ratio was tight. With only 2.5 gallons its pretty tough to get it seperated. When I make fruit beer I calculate in a higher %-age of loss because you can't siphon it all out. Raspberries are especially tough because they fall apart into many little bits.


2

The minerals that we care about are: calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, sulfate, sodium and chloride. Different styles want different quantities. You can adjust your distilled water to a particular mineral profile by adding various salts. You're best to read Chapter 15 of How To Brew by John Palmer. On older version is online here: ...


2

Time and cold temps are the best way. Keep it around 35F for a couple weeks and it will clear.


2

You can get a false bottom with dip tube from any of the online home brew stores or your LHBS. They're a little pricey ($30 - $100+), so I made one cheaply with stuff I had lying around. It consists of 1/2 inch threaded / female coupler, about 6 inch length of pipe, a 90 deg. elbow, and another 1-2 inch length of pipe. This is the dip tube. You don't ...



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