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1

Denny & jsled are right, and I want to add: dry hopping is usually done at the end of fermentation, and could prolong the time to completion (unless you put the hops right the keg you will serve from). Saisons can be be made very fast, the ferment can go up 90F (maybe higher) without a problem. I use Wyeast French Saison all the time and find it very ...


5

I recently turned around an AIPA in 8 days from brewing to drinking. The key was pitching an adequate amount of healthy yeast and carefully controlling fermentation temp. I ran at 63F for 3 days until FG was reached, raised to 70F for 1-2 days to complete fermentation, then crashed to 33 for 3 days to clear the beer, kegged and force carbed.


5

Specialty grains, extract vs. all-grain does not make a difference on fermentation time. The reason to avoid dry-hopping in primary is not for interference with fermentation, but the yeast and CO₂ production will separately steal a lot of hop character. There is something about overpitching yeast, but I wouldn't worry about it too much; if you're really ...


0

You might also want to check your fermenting temperature. Pitching when the wort is hotter than the optimal temperature for the yeast can lead to higher than expected fermentation rates and resultant overflow.


0

This is usually caused when there is a lot of wort volume for the size of the fermentor combined with a very active fermentation. It isn't anything to worry about just make sure you have a blow off hose like you said. To avoid problems like this in the future, reduce your batch size or increase the carboy size. Actually adding to that 11gr seems like a ...


0

In case it helps anyone, the solution was a blow-off hose like this: http://www.thisisdrivel.com/beer/brews/images/whim090516_001.jpg


1

The style guidelines for wheat beers mention ester notes as being common in German, and moderate in American wheat beers. I expect you might be ok. On the other hand, you might go with a saison or other farmhouse style that's more heat tolerant. You'll get more predictable results staying within the recommended temperature.


0

Yes and no (sorry). It depends on the kind of sugar used, as well as the yeast. You could get close with grapes or honey, as nearly all the sugar will ferment. But malt/malt extract would always have a good amount of unfermentable sugar in it, adding uncertainty in addition to the yeast. Now, if you know your yeast and your fermentables very well, then ...


1

I see stories all the time about broken hydrometers. They are fairly fragile devices. Why risk contaminating a batch of beer you worked so hard on (and is worth more than the hydrometer even) with thin shards of broken glass that would be the result of breaking the hydrometer inside your carboy? Especially in a narrow-necked glass carboy, I could see this ...


1

Since you're already going with a Belgian strain it might be best to re-pitch something like The Yeast Bay's Dry Belgian Ale, and in the meantime give the fermentor a swirl. Assuming you had a bit of wheat/oats in the recipe it should hopefully not dry out too much.


9

Yes, fermentation will produce orders of magnitude more CO₂ than it takes to bubble the airlock. But usually when people are not seeing bubbles, it's because there is some other, easier, way for the CO₂ to escape. Either an improperly-sealed bucket lid or an improperly-set bung in a carboy neck. Don't worry about seeing airlock activity, except as it might ...


2

You could try giving the fermenter a good shake to stir up the yeast and restart the fermentation. To get my barely wines to ferment completely I need to shake the fermenter a couple of times. I wait until the fermentation has slowed right down and then shake the fermenter to stir up the yeast and trub in the bottom. This helps restart the fermentation. ...


1

I dropped mine into the glass carboy and left it in (wasn't an easy way to get it out). It was a bit difficult to read but I managed. Removed it carefully after bottling. No disasters.


1

I've tried several variations, including putting the hydrometer into the fermenting vessel and also a mini fermentation in a sample tube kept alongside the fermenting vessel. The former is hard to read; the latter may not ferment at the same rate as the main brew. In both cases, you get sediment settling on the hydrometer potentially weighing it down and ...


0

You'll have no issues with an open fermentation in terms of contamination from the open air if there is still a layer of CO2 at the interface of the liquid and the air, which will be the case during active fermentation. I'm assuming that your container is covered with something, either plastic or a lid and ferm. lock. If you are completely open to the air ...


3

The biggest issue in doing that is that krausen will get stuck to both your hydrometer and your carboy walls. Even if you wait for the krausen to die off before dumping your hydrometer in, you will still have a bit of a hard time reading it through the krausened carboy walls... But hey, go ahead and try! That is the essence of homebrewing.


5

For the benefit you'd gain from leaving your hydro in there (maybe saving some volume as you won't take samples) I think it wouldn't really be worth your time as I imagine it would be pretty difficult to read without having to clean it off. Also having to open up your fermentor each time to take a reading exposes the wort to possible infection. I usually ...


-2

I think it's already fermented. This is ages and and from memory so I don't Remember the details of SG or anything like that. I once brewed a batch of 80 penny while living in Florida. Pitched the yeast, the next day I was looking for signs of kickoff, but it looked dead. Pitched in more yeast, another day...nothing, in fact you could still see it floating ...


0

I make citrus wine by first making a simple white wine, then adding a gallon of fresh squeezed oj on top with a pound of sugar. It usually takes another 10 days or so. Rack it for a couple of weeks and bottle that deliciousness.


4

I would give it another week, just to make sure the yeast is done, but I'm going to guess it won't drop down much lower, and will attribute that to: the slightly high mash temp; 10%+ Crystal malt; low initial yeast health from pitching just a vial instead of a starter.


1

tl;dr: If the thief is properly sanitized there's little reason that the sample can't be safely returned to the fermenter. Longer answer: There's not really any reason to be checking the gravity until all visible fermentation has stopped (i.e. the kraeusen has dropped and the airlock isn't making any more noise). Generally, the idea is to wait for a few ...


1

I like the taste of sweet wort, so I just drink my thief contents, but if you really don't want to waste your future beer, set up a one gallon sanitized carboy with its own airlock and put it next to your larger carboy. Keep your testing leftovers in this second bottle so that if contamination does occur, it won't ruin the whole batch. If you are using a ...



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