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1

You can wrap the whole fermentation carboy or bucket in a black plastic trash bag. It stops light and will contain any messy spills or explosions. Be sure to leave the bag open at the top so heat and gas can escape.


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For best results, you should add priming sugar to a bottling bucket rather than to each bottle. Dissolve your sugar in hot water, then rack on top of it. Gently stir the beer for a few seconds to mix it. DO NOT AERATE. A good rule of thumb for carbonating in bottles is to let them sit at 70-75F for 3 weeks.


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Beer yeasts use the Crabtree effect to undergo fermentation in the presence of (some) oxygen. On the other hand, bread yeasts prefer to undergo respiration rather than fermentation in the presence of oxygen. A byproduct of the TCA cycle is CO2-but not alcohol. If you limit your oxygen levels then you will get alcohol produced as the yeast will switch from a ...


1

Generally speaking, the amount of time for proper conditioning after completion of primary fermentation increases with the OG of the post-boil wort. It can also be dependent on beer style and personal taste. A low gravity (1.040's) ale can be ready in 2 weeks. A high gravity russian imperial stout can sometimes take 6 months to develop the flavors desired ...


1

I buy extract kits complete with instructions. All of the kits I bought say ferment for 2 weeks then bottle. Then condition 2 weeks in the bottle. (one exception being a pumpkin spice ale that required 8 weeks in primary). That being said, my blonde ales seem to like the 2 weeks just fine but the cream ale didnt really reach its prime until 3 weeks. This I ...


1

This has happened to many brewers before and does not mean your batch is ruined. More than likely, the peak of the fermentation activity has passed. You should clean your fermenter with a sanitized cloth on the outer areas where the spill occurred. Also re-clean and sanitize your air lock and lid or bung-stopper of your carboy or bucket, and reseal them. ...


1

It can happen - just let the mead continue as normal. It's probably equally due to temperature or the amount of yeast pitched and not just the sugar, since there are also plenty of simple sugars in honey.


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I don't think this question can be answered without more information: what was the final gravity? how much priming sugar did you add? what was 'the required time'? Probably the best advice is wait another week or two and then sample it again. I often find it can take several weeks after bottling for appropriate carbonation.


0

While these temperatures are great for brewing, it's the swing in temp that yeast don't like. Get as consistent as possible with refrigeration or otherwise first. That said, 2nd generation is actually much more tolerant to temperature swings than the 1st generation of yeast you get right out of the vial/bag. This will help you brew most types of beers ...


3

For this situation, you may want to consider yeast strains where extra phenol and ester production due to a stressful environment is considered a good thing in the final product. Typically Belgian yeast strains are more tolerable of stressful environments, in fact some brewers intentionally raise the temperature of their belgian ales in order to get the ...


0

Are you sure you have 5 gallons when you start fermentation? I found that I was losing more than expected during boiling; I was only getting about 40-43 bottles instead of the expected 48-52. I marked my fermentation vessels with gallon marks on the outside so when the instructions say to fill to 5 gallons, I know how much water to add. I now get the full ...


1

I've found that if you don't cold crash your beer before siphoning it off, you'll want to let it sit for a day or two before siphoning it to ensure that all the trub at the bottom of the carboy/bucket has settled out. This means that if you didn't refrigerate your beer before siphoning to secondary or your bottling bucket, you'll want to move it to where ...


5

Sorry to say that looks like the beginning of a pellicle, meaning your beer is infected. But if you drink it quickly, you may avoid the worst of it. Best case, it might even taste good! And NEVER put that heater in your beer! Put the beer in a tub of water and put the heater in the water.


5

First, there is almost never a need to use a secondary fermenter unless you add something to the beer that produces a true secondary fermentation. The idea of using a secondary on a regular basis comes from the commercial brewing industry. The fermenters homebrewers use are far smaller and the risk of autolysis is virtually nonexistent, unlike commercial ...


2

1) Do I raise after 3 days or some other amount? (Rule of thumb here as I'm not going to take gravity readings) Assuming you aren't taking gravity readings, therefor you aren't examining the apparent attenuation, your best bet is to wait until after high-krausen. This really depends on the gravity of the beer, what yeast your using (ale vs. lager, fast ...


1

The main point of raising the temp is simple. As the sugars become limiting the yeast begin to enter a dormancy phase. As yeast slow down the temp of your fermentation begins to lower too. That lowering temp is also a signal to yeast to go dormant. This causes a cyclical effect of potential having the yeast drop out sooner than you want and you do not ...


0

It sounds like the kind of temperature change you're talking about shouldn't bother the yeast much unless it pushes them below or out of the proper range of fermentation temperatures for that specific yeast. Rapid changes can shock or hurt the yeast, for example if you dump a small, warm liquid yeast or yeast starter into a cold wort/must then the yeast ...


1

Partly it depends on the yeast. Westmalle (WLP 550, Wy 3787) is notorious for flocculating in the middle of a fermentation if it gets too cold, and thereafter being impossible to rouse. At that point, re-pitching is the only option. It can also very easily take off and get too hot--I've had 80F+ with it. Water bath is the best bet for that yeast. But it's ...


3

I recently brewed a 14% RIS using a similar technique - I started out with S-04, and then used WLP099 to continue where that couldn't. Since the WLP090 yeast strain has a high alcohol tolerance, you only need the WLP099 if you're talking abv levels above around 13%. I think your plan sounds about right - although I would use more WLP090 and less WLP099, or ...



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