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3

It also doesn't hurt to start low, leave for a couple of days, increase, leave for a couple of days, etc. I usually don't increase it once I see krausen until the krausen starts to fall, but mosts ale yeasts say 65-75, but will ferment nice and clean down at ~60. This varies by yeast, but never hurts to start a bit low. Also, raising the temp a couple of ...


4

Generally, most yeast created flavors will happen in the first 72 hours. After that (in general) you can start ramping up. You can also wait 4-5 days to be safe.


1

I don't think that there will be a time where fermentation is still ongoing, but that there will be no off flavors generated. As I understand it, what's going on when a brewer raises the temperature for a time during fermentation, they are allowing for the generation of some off flavors. It will either fit the style of the beer, or if enough of the ...


0

WLP001 that ferments warm has a tendency to throw diacetyl and fusel alcohols. The former will be "cleaned up" by the yeast already in the beer, the latter won't be cleaned up by anything … it will only be diluted by the extra gallon. At the same time, I don't think it will particularly harm your beer to add ~1gl of simlar wort at this point. But I don't ...


2

A little worried, perhaps, but regardless you should attempt to keep the yeast/beer itself in the yeast's ideal temperature range. If you have a temp controller, then look into getting some sort of "thermowell" to put the temp controller's sensor in the middle of the fermentor itself, but taping (and insulting) the probe against the side of the fermentor ...


0

I put this into the calculator at Brewer's Friend (approximately, what with 1lbs. 15.1oz anyway?) and got an OG of 1.092 and FG of 1.024.* So maybe you you should ask why you missed the OG.** Marris Otter is not overflowing with enzymes like most 2-row is, so your mash is more sensitive to small mistakes. And your mash temp is on the upper edge for ...


0

Have to laugh at Rob.O : "My beer wipes the floor (prolly a good metaphor that) with it, when it comes to alcohol percent . Ok, you make it stronger, got it. The taste is o.k. (what happened to this massive floor wiping action???); now comes the best. My friends are pissed after 2-3 pints. Sheesh, better exit the teenie years at the very least before ...


0

Is this a 10 gallon batch? The crystal malts are only around 10% of the grist, so I don't think you have a problem there. I would consider 78 F too warm for pitching WLP001, but I doubt that's your problem either. My guess is that the fermentation has slowed down because you under pitched and presumably didn't oxygenate the wort. Each White Labs vial would ...


0

It seems that the ferment is already more than half finished, so there already some bonus flavors in your beer. I found some people saying 72F is fine, 75F is a little estery, 80F is really too warm. You can try to cool the ferment a little more in the later stages, it might help, but this yeast might finish up by tomorrow. In the future, try other ...


0

If you want a crystal clear finish then unfortunately you will have to add more finings and rack again.


0

This article may hold the answers you seek: https://winemakermag.com/1254-soapy-wines-vintage-dates-wine-wizard "...I suspect you’ve got a fatty acid issue caused by your stuck/sluggish fermentation. S. cerevisiae can emit fatty acids when under fermentative stress..." Stuck fermentations can be caused by a lack of dissolved oxygen in the first few days of ...


1

The open fermenter may ferment cooler due to the insulation of a lid, just as a pan with a lid on boils faster, but I can see the difference being huge. that is all things being equal. One difference that could potentially affect things regarding temperature would be the availability of dissolved oxygen, with more O2 available the yeast should be able to ...


1

I have a Picobrew Zymatic and tried following their instructions for the first few brews. The results were rather disappointing. Since I know the people at Picobrew, I talked to them about it. It seems that the method is a kinda beginner's least possible effort method, rather than something they specifically recommend or that anyone there does. I went ...


1

For fermenting, I just remove the gas-in keg post, fit a 1/2" hose onto the screw fitting, clamp it, and stick the other end of the hose in a glass filled with starsan. When fermentation's done, I replace the gas-in post and push to another (purged) keg. My fermentation keg's dip tube is a couple inches shorter than a regular one - that's how I avoid ...


0

Although it would be wasteful of electricity, you could have two temperature zones in a single freezer with the higher temperature confined to a single carboy and the lower temperature dominating the remainder of the refrigerated space. Put one controller on the freezer's plug and place its temperature probe on one side of the chest's interior. Set this ...


0

My concern would be that if you're going to construct this in a way to circulate the cool air, you will also be circulating the warm air. I don't see how you'd be able to make two zones that share cooling (or heating) elements that can remain effectively independent. I suppose you could construct it a little like a refrigerator. Plan on chamber 1 always ...


-1

Can't you smell the alcohol, I'm having the same problem. Using a five gallon bucket with 2 gallons of mash. I can here it bubbling, and smell the alcohol(I think!!) But airlock isn't really moving its been 2 days, and I didn't know you weren't supposed to take off the lid!!! Ive opened and stirred it 2-3 times now. Any thoughts???


0

I always up my liquid to finish a bit over the planned 5 gallon standard, before separating the beer from the trub. Mainly because of priming concerns, most of my beers require 1oz of corn sugar per gallon. When I first started I ended up with just over 4 gallons and then added the kit's allotment of priming sugar, not bottle bombs, but definitely over ...


0

As quoted, "do not recommend racking to a secondary fermenter for ANY ale". The OP didn't mention if this is an ale, what is the stance for a lager?


0

It seems that you are just looking to increase your final alcohol percentage. If that is the case, consider bottling up some of your beer in plastic 2-litre bottles and throwing them in your freezer for a day or two. The water content of the beer will freeze, but the flavor compounds and alcohol won't. Once you've got an ice-cube floating in the middle of ...


0

Dry hopping and secondary fermentation are not great things to do together. Dry hopping is best done after fermentation, preferably after racking the beer off of the yeast cake. The acids from the hops will actually stick to the yeast (that's how they inhibit the growth of bacteria, etc) reducing the flavor. I also suspect that having active fermentation ...


2

Adding hops late in the process is pretty common, it's called dry hopping. It's a great way to enhance the aroma of hops, without increasing the bitterness too much. It creates a nice fresh characteristic in the beer. Adding more yeast is not exactly common, but not unheard of. It can be used if the fermentation is stuck, and needs a kick. Sometimes yeast ...


1

Here is my simple recipe for home-made wine using readily available ingredients. - 2 cans frozen grape juice concentrate - 2 cups sugar - 1 pkg Lalvin EC-1118 wine yeast (beer/wine shop or internet) Follow instructions for rehydrating yeast on package. While waiting on yeast, pour both cans of juice concentrate into a 1 gallon container and add sugar. add ...


0

There is virtually no pressure difference between open and closed fermentation. Evaporation, on the other hand, could cool the open fermenter.


-1

In this way you will find only smelled spoiled juice at the end..


0

As others have said, there's nothing inherently wrong with topping off past 5 gallons but you will alter the profile of the beer. You'll change your OG and probably your final IBUs. Probably not the color with just a quarter of a gallon, but you'll have a different-tasting beer in exchange for like two extra bottles of beer. Losing volume between the ...


2

In addition to BBS's answer (this will lower your OG), filling past the 5 gallon mark will further reduce the amount of headspace in your carboy/bucket. Some yeast require more room than others, and you could end up clogging up your airlock or losing more beer out a blowoff tube. My advice would be to target a specific gravity rather than a specific volume. ...


0

I have made quite a few batches of beer from extract kits and it started to annoy me when bottling day came that I didn't fill 48 bottles, so I started adding a little extra in primary to make sure I got 48 bottles on bottling day. BBS is totally correct, you are going to lower your OG and possibly alter the flavor profile of your wort, but for me, I prefer ...


2

There's certainly nothing that's going to stop you, and everything will probably turn out fine if you make no changes to your recipe and just throw in an extra 1/4 gallon at the end. But you are diluting your wort a bit, so you're decreasing your OG. You could attempt to increase your OG by a minor amount, but that will be a little more difficult since ...


1

Grape skins have wild yeast on them that will, in time, ferment the grape juice. Depending on the particular blend of yeast on your grapes, you may get complete fermentation, or the yeast may have low alcohol tolerance and the fermentation will halt before all the sugars have been consumed. Yeast contribute to the flavour profile of the wine, and ...


3

Apparently you haven't gotten sick yet, so its safe enough to drink. You're probably getting spontaneous fermentation from whatever was growing on the fruit. The low pH of citrus makes this safe in terms of bacterial growth, but yeasts and mold could be growing in it. And maybe some lactobacillus, which is a plus in my opinion. So maybe its safe, or maybe ...


2

Fermentation time will depend on a lot of factors...if you want to compare to Wyeast, you need to specify which strain. 05 and 1056 ferment in about the same amount of time. but 05 often takes longer to drop clear. I think 05 -may- ferment a bit faster than 04, but no guarantees. The difference in flavor between 04 and 05 is dramatic.



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