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I wouldn't be too concerned by it but just be sure to keep up with the gravity reading to check for real progress. That's the surefire way to make sure your beer is doing what it's supposed to. Airlock activity isn't the only sign.


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Airlock activity is not the be-all end-all. You could have a bad seal on a bucket or on the airlock grommet itself. Give it a little time (3-4 days) then check the gravity. Gravity movement is really the only 100% reliable way to test if the yeast is working.


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Wort It will be good, if you will have a good way to stir. In 30 liters I found temperature differences of more than 20°C to be possible, and ones around 5-10°C to be pretty common. So make sure some kind of automatic stir is there, or heat really, really slowly. Safety Be sure to use system that, if probe is short circuited or missing, switches off ...


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Osmotic pressure does retard cell devision in most micro organisms making it hard to grow "in" a dense solution but they will have no problem growing "on" such a solution. High sugar content does little to inhibit growth of bacteria and yeast as long as it's still a solution and not a "gel". That being said, you can sour your juices you mentioned with lacto ...


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Congratulations on your first brew, I used a similar kit for my first brew and was pretty nervous about the fermentation process as well. All of the bubbling is fine — it won't always be vigorous but at times can just be slow and steady. As long as the bubbles are there you know your beer is doing the right thing.


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"Is this required for the beer to be fermented properly?" No, it should be fermented fully within a couple weeks at most, though Belgian yeast can be a bit finicky. However the bigger issue is conditioning time. Belgian quads are usually ~11+%ABV. If you drink that two weeks after fermentation is done, it'll probably taste a bit like gasoline (a lot of ...


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With Kvass you don't want to wait longer then 3-4 days. In fact, all your fermentation should be done in 1-2 days in a warm place, that's why you don't really wanna go above 4%ABV. Then it should be cold-crashed for 1-2 days, filtered and consumed within another 3-4 days... It should not take longer then 7 days from making Kvass to finishing a last pint of ...


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Bubbles are a good thing slow or rapid just keep in a dark room temperature between 62-72 you should be fine..


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my experience has been that 3-5 days total is plenty for dry hopping, post fermentation and as close to kegging/bottling as possible.


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Matter cannot be created nor destroyed So really the only calorie loss during fermentation is that in which the yeast burn and what is concentrated from the loss of c02 escaping. Ethanol has 6.9 calories per gram Sugar has 4 calories per gram Here is a calculator http://realbeer.com/spencer/attenuation.html#calories If you play with the numbers for ...


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Well in your specific kombucha I won’t be able to tell you but I can give you some math that should help you figure it out and should be able to be used by any brewer to figure out the caloric effect of fermentation on your brews. So just to hit you with the math right now and ill break it down later the equation to figure out the change in calories caused ...


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Funnily enough my primary fermentation vessel is the same room as my drumkit and a bunch of guitar amplifiers and I practice pretty much daily. I had no idea that "quiet" was a rule and as far as I can tell there's been no effect on beer production.


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I agree quiet means low traffic area. I found my cat playing with the airlock because of the bubbles so I think if it's in a spot where little one or animals can't move it around is the best situation. I also noticed many people ferment in garages which I thought would be too loud considering cars in and out.


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Tails or Tailings is what's left of a material after it has been processes and something more valuable has been removed. Though a term used in mining more than homebrewing. In brewing this will refer to making use of... 1) Second runnings from a mash, parti-gyle. Great for a second a batch of a smaller beer or for yeast starter wort. 2) Making use of ...


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I believe Acetobacter will spoil your product only if there is an oxygen present. So, to prevent that, good airlock would be enough. Once fermentation is in progress, there should be enough CO2 to push the air out, even if airlock is poor. As fermentation slows down, CO2 will be produced in smaller quantities and demands to airlock qualities became higher. I ...


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The result is strain dependent for sure. In general, more esters is the prevailing wisdom, but more than an English ale yeast at room temperature? I've never seen the experiment done side by side so who knows. Experimentation would be needed to really suss it all out. Keeping some of the 'hybrid' strains as cool as possible can give some very clean ...


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If I remeber correctly you have the 1 gal. glass carboy and ran a tube from the lid into a pot of sanitized solution. After the bubbling slowed the airlock was supposed to go on. What youre seeing is Krauzen - totally normal amd will sink to the bottom. You should be storing your fermentables in a dark place that stays around 60-70 F ...think cupboard or ...


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Most lagers need to ferment below 55°F during growth phase to reduce esters and fusel alcohols. Diacetyl Rest Towards the end of the feeding phase (last couple days of primary) the temperature is raised to low ale temps 65-72° for a couple days, this gives the yeast a boost in metabolism to clean up Diacetyl. So heat is a good thing at one point in the ...


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In general, fermenting lager yeast at room temperatures would result in off flavors due to esters, diacetyl, and other components. The "California Common" is an exception to this, and the standard explanation is that the yeast strain (Wyeast 2112 or WLP810) used for this style of beer can handle higher temperatures than most lager strains. Who knows, ...


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I always leave the lid of the fermentor on loose, covering the bin so that no bacteria, mold etc will fall in but allowing the air to circulate for the first 24 hours until a nice kraussen has formed then seal it up. I used to seal it up tight on day 0 for the fear of the air getting in, but after reading Yeast by Chris White I changed my tune entirely and ...


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It would need some Amino Acids, or at least some nitrogenous compounds to make AAs from. It would ferment some what with out, but it will need some nitrogenous compounds to grow and thrive.


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As the previous posters mention it sounds OK just a bit of a slow start. If after 48 hours you are still concerned, take a gravity reading and if it has not noticeably dropped, then re-pitch a new starter.



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