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1

I would give it a try. I have done this with a Sanke keg several times. Couple thoughts: - If it is an old Pepsi corny, you may be able to unscrew the pressure relief valve, remove, use an air lock or blow off tube. - Once activity has slowed, (Like only a few points above terminal gravity) replace the pressure relief valve and let it naturally carbonate. ...


1

Wrap the top of the carboy and bung with some aluminum foil. This should add just enough pressure to hold it in place until it dries. Plastic wrap may do the same thing.


1

Let the sanitized bung dry (preferably away from dust) before inserting. It fits more snuggly that way.


1

It's also important to note: 5 gallon carboys usually use #7 bungs and 6 gallons use #6.5. The main risk here is that you'll sink the bung into the carboy if it's too small, but I imagine if it was too big you might have difficulty getting it to stay in. Also, I find it works best to fully insert the airlock in the bung, then insert the bung in the carboy, ...


0

Have you tried Carboy Caps? http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/3-5-6-gall-carboy-cap-orange.html I've had the same problem and switched to the caps and find they work Great


4

It looks like the fermentation is complete, as the specific gravity has essentially stabilized. However, I'd leave it at 20C for another week at least to let the yeast clean up before cold-crashing. This is called the "conditioning phase", and can greatly improved the beer's flavour.


5

Duct tape....I've done it more than once.


2

Good 'ol fashioned weight works for me ;-) My bung for my blowoff hose kept popping out, so I just stuck this book on it. I know you're talking about an airlock, but just thought I'd share what my fermenter looks like right now. Also, are you doing blowoff at all? I usually do blowoff and then switch to an airlock after the fermentation dies down a bit. I'm ...


0

The stopper does not need to be fully "inside" the neck of the carboy. It simply needs to rest naturally in the neck, and its own weight should hold it in place. Any CO2 should easily be relieved through the hole and through the airlock or blow-off tube; there should not be enough pressure to move the stopper at all.


3

I have these bungs: Soft-ish rubber bung on the left, stiff plasticky rubber in the middle and soft silicone on the right. Silicone seems to be the least slippery when wet, but the soft rubber works OK. The one in the middle, OTOH will come out if you look at it funny. Your bung should require some effort to remove. If so, then make sure you don't some ...


2

Cleber, I'm trying things very close to what you're thinking. I'm no chilling, fermenting, and serving on kegs. But I think an extra keg could be a good thing. If you have one, I think it is useful to transfer from the no-chill to the fermentor to aerate your wort. I'm doing this over pressure to ensure air contact. Otherwise you can aerate another way and ...


3

Hop residue will be a problem. Even if you use pellet hops, you will get clogs in the dip tube or valves when trying to purge the trub from the bottom of the keg. I know this from a disastrous keg-hopping experiment. You'll want to exclude hops when transferring the hot wort to the keg.


0

My first impression is, since ginger grows in the ground, these bugs are used to have a lot of minerals around, but they are now forced to live on distilled water and (refined?) sugar. So the first thing I would try is to replace the distilled water with used boiled tap water (or other ground water if you can get something clean). Other points: One of the ...


0

It could be an infection, although there doesn't appear to be anything wrong in the pictures. Maybe you just don't like the style?


0

Sour, astringent and vinegary. Definitely sounds like an infection. Lactic and acetic acid also both have higher specific gravity than water or alcohol, so that's probably why your gravity went up between weeks two and three. Lost cause? I don't know, can you stand to drink it? If not, it's certainly not going to get any better with time. What is your ...


0

I do not recommend freeze concentrating this brew. To do so would be quite dangerous. Freeze concentrating is iffy at the best of times, even when concentrating something that has brewed clean. What it does is concentrate everything (except water). Distilling (properly) will remove unhealthy brewing by-products like methanol and other organic chemicals. ...


1

A cheesy smell usually means you have bacteria in your mash and they have access to oxygen. If this were a sour-mashed beer it would be considered a lost cause at this point. I don't know how this kit is supposed to work, but it's sounds like sanitation is the issue.


1

The only issue I can see is potentially overwhelming the blow-off setup by sending in three primary fermentations worth of foam through one dip tube, since you indicate you'd set this system at the start of fermentation. Between the long, skinny dip tube and all the narrow passages through posts and fittings, I could imagine some of the really chunky first ...


1

I imagine some flow of foam between kegs might be possible, but not necessarily bad. Almost a Burton Union system if done right. I would make sure that each keg has it's own relief valve (these are cornies, right?) and try to use clear tubing as much as possible, so you can see that foam is flowing and each keg is fermenting on schedule.


1

Your mileage may vary... If it was my brew, I certainly would not give up on it (yet). I would gently set it out and let it settle for a few hours, then rack to another container, being careful not to pull anything (like glass) into the second fermenter. (Leave more than normal and make sure and use the diverter on your siphon.) Then you can triage the ...



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