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7

It is impossible to predict YOUR FG. I know nothing about your skill level, your fermentation processes (temp, O2, pitching rates). I know nothing about the yeast you plan to use. I know nothing about the true fermentability of the extract and booster you are using. That said some estimates can be made. In the best of scenarios if we assume a 65% ...


5

Given the recipe, that's exactly the sort of flavour I'd expect. I've never made this beverage, but I've made sauerkraut and it's done in an almost identical way except using cabbage instead of beets. The fermentation is bacterial, and lactobacilli play a predominant role. These bacteria produce lactic acid which is what makes sauerkraut sour, and presumably ...


5

Sorry to say that looks like the beginning of a pellicle, meaning your beer is infected. But if you drink it quickly, you may avoid the worst of it. Best case, it might even taste good! And NEVER put that heater in your beer! Put the beer in a tub of water and put the heater in the water.


5

First, there is almost never a need to use a secondary fermenter unless you add something to the beer that produces a true secondary fermentation. The idea of using a secondary on a regular basis comes from the commercial brewing industry. The fermenters homebrewers use are far smaller and the risk of autolysis is virtually nonexistent, unlike commercial ...


5

What you describe in your comments sounds like trub (pronounced "troob"). It's mostly yeast, proteins, fats, and sometimes hop material. It's totally normal for that stuff to settle to the bottom of the vessel after fermentation is complete. You don't filter it; you just let it settle and then carefully siphon the beer off while picking up as little of the ...


5

40 degrees is quite a bit lower than the bottom range for your yeast. I'd expect that they've gone pretty much inactive. But don't worry! All you need to do to reactivate them is to warm your brew back up to the optimal temperature and provide some gentle agitation. Be careful not to splash! As fermentation has already stated, you don't want to add any ...


4

It sounds like you underpitched by quite a large amount. As for options, you have some: Pitch an ale yeast. You'll want to bring the temperature up to at least 17 C to keep the yeast happy. You'll end up with an ale, not a lager, but still a good beer. Raise the temperature for a short while. If you can bring the temperature up to 15 C, you should start to ...


4

Well, it's either the yeast or the wort that's giving you the trouble. You can find out by doing a forced fermentation test - take a small amount of wort, and pitch a relatively large amount of yeast (e.g. 1/2 sachet of dry yeast.) Keep it at 75F or more so that the yeast ferment out any fermentable sugars. After at least 1 day, or once the yeast have ...


4

Using any of those things to filter beer will badly oxidize it and ruin the flavor. I clear beer with time and cold temperature. A couple months at 35F will clear just about any beer. You can also use things like gelatin, Polyclar, or Biofine. If you want to filter you needs kegs and a CO2 setup to push the beer so you can do it in an enclosed manner and ...


4

Glass carboys are not rated for pressure, I would definitely not recommend trying it there. If fermenting or finishing in a metal vessel (like a corny keg), you can use a spunding valve to control the amount of pressure in the keg to force carbonation, similar to actively adding CO₂ to the keg to force carbonate after fermentation. It's a practice born out ...


4

I get the same kraeusen when using liquid yeast - it's not from hydration shock. In fact, the dead yeast that don't survive hydration simply fall to the bottom of the fermentor. The reason for the kraeusen is the constant churning of the wort during active fermentation, which mixes proteins, tannins and hop-alpha acids to create the structure for the ...


4

You have the potential for oxidized beer. It may not happen, or if it does it may not be too bad. But the best thing to do would be to drink the beer soon, before potential oxidation has a chance to get worse.


4

I think what will end up happening is something like… After lag and reproduction, the yeast will start to ferment, and pressure will build up on the fermenting corny. This will slowly push still-fermenting wort into the second carboy, though perhaps following some of the trub that will have settled out first. At some point, the two cornys will reach an ...


4

You can use the pressure from fermentation to transfer from the fermenter to a serving keg. First, you'll want a spunding valve on the fermenter to control the pressure by releasing gas after the target pressure has been reached. When fermentation is complete, pressurize the serving keg with CO2 to slightly less pressure than what's showing on the ...


4

I take it from the title that you added the priming sugar and bottled the beer, then put it in the fridge? If that's the case, you'll probably be OK. Just let the beer come up to room temperature and leave them alone for two weeks. Open one and see if it's carbonated. If it is, job well done. Relax and drink your beer. Otherwise, the yeast was knocked back ...


4

In the first stage of fermentation it could be some good. Yeast needs oxygen to the growth phase, when building membrane and other things needed to increase the cell count. When this oxygen is over, then the yeast can take its anaerobian way, and produce alcohol and carbon dioxide, which is needed for beer making. But if you shake your wort vigorously some ...


4

Temperature would be my first bet. You didn't mention what temperature you experienced during your primary fermentation. If your temperature was appropriate for the champagne yeast, then my next bet would be that your OG was not very high; therefore your yeast ate up what little sugar was present in a comparatively short time. Did you augment the bananas ...


3

You can certainly try it. That's the major advantage of homebrewing. However, just because these beers are coming prepackaged nowadays doesn't mean that's the way its done in the place of origin. These things evolved really as beer cocktails. I think its far better to just add the lemonade to the beer in the glass. That way you have great beer to begin ...


3

At this point you don't know if the fermentation is stuck or finished. Despite the yeast attenuation rating, it's the fermentability of the wort that determines attenuation. Alcohol tolerance is not the problem. More yeast might help or it might not. Before you do anything you should try a fast ferment test to determine if there are any more fermentable ...


3

I too was curious about this the other day. Turns out for five gallons/18.9 L of 1.060 wort at 75% apparent attenuation, 449.1 L/ 15.86 cubic feet/ 118.64 gal of CO2 is produced (standard temperature and pressure. This amounts to 0.88 kg/ 1.94 lb of CO2! I have a few charts for different gravities and apparent attenuations at my blog post about it. I ...


3

No, I don't think the fill level on an airlock is going to prevent bubbling. Short answer, but I don't think there is more to it. Edit: I found time to respond in more detail. I experienced the same thing (no bubbling, but pressing on lid squeezes out bubbles) in two-gallon bucket fermenters, so I looked carefully at the airlocks to see if over- or ...


3

For this situation, you may want to consider yeast strains where extra phenol and ester production due to a stressful environment is considered a good thing in the final product. Typically Belgian yeast strains are more tolerable of stressful environments, in fact some brewers intentionally raise the temperature of their belgian ales in order to get the ...


3

I recently brewed a 14% RIS using a similar technique - I started out with S-04, and then used WLP099 to continue where that couldn't. Since the WLP090 yeast strain has a high alcohol tolerance, you only need the WLP099 if you're talking abv levels above around 13%. I think your plan sounds about right - although I would use more WLP090 and less WLP099, or ...


3

I'd just remove the lid and set it lightly on top, or cover the fermenter with foil or plastic wrap. Many breweries use open fermentation. Your will have a loose covering and the krausen will protect the beer. Resecure the lid once the krausen drops.


3

Fermented beer contains somewhere around 0.8 volumes of CO₂. When you rack to secondary, you're certainly causing some (however minimal) agitation of the beer, which will cause some CO₂ to be released. You may also be changing temperature, which might cause some CO₂ to be released. And dry-hopping is going to give tons of nucleation sites for CO₂, which will ...


3

Yes, you need to dilute it. There is a mead calculator here: http://www.gotmead.com/2014-04-16-20-10-09/mead-calculator.html but it's a bit hard to use, so if you can't figure it out go for 1/4 to 1/3 honey by volume. There's another issue. Honey is basically just sugar, and yeast needs more than just sugar and water to live. You can either buy special ...


3

It's best to remove the hops, but it's not a deal breaker if you don't. It will just make it harder to siphon the beer later. There are 2 other options to consider...you can put the hops in a nylon or muslin bag so that the entire bag can be removed later. Or after the wort has been cooled post boil, you can pour it through a sanitized strainer into your ...


3

If primary fermentation is complete, adding priming sugar only allows the wort to consume the newly added sugar; it doesn't continue to ferment afterward. In a 5gal corny keg, 4 oz of corn sugar will be sufficient. You must leave it at room temp (just like a bottle) for a couple of weeks. It should carbonate just fine. (Akin to cask conditioning). You can ...


3

The smack pack should have inflated in the six hours between breaking the nutrient seal and opening it. If it didn't, that's an indication that the yeast are not working at full strength. If you don't see any fermentation 48 hours after pitching, the yeast has almost certainly failed. Your beer is at the greatest risk for infection before the yeast is ...


2

Yes, yes, and not necessarily. (1) You usually get hop aromas from the airlock during initial fermentation. (2) The aroma has always disappeared after a few days. The hop aroma is coming through the airlock, so the fermentation is clearly producing and pushing CO2 gas through the airlock (or leaking from a leaky bucket seal) - CO2 gas that also has picked ...



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