Hot answers tagged

10

This is no problem at all. To address your questions: "what effect (taste, strength, yeast effects) might I expect from adding the sugar at the start of fermentation?" Priming sugar (almost definitely glucose a.k.a dextrose), being nearly tasteless and highly fermentable (90+%), will increase ABV% without adding either residual (unfermentable) sugar or ...


9

Yes, fermentation will produce orders of magnitude more CO₂ than it takes to bubble the airlock. But usually when people are not seeing bubbles, it's because there is some other, easier, way for the CO₂ to escape. Either an improperly-sealed bucket lid or an improperly-set bung in a carboy neck. Don't worry about seeing airlock activity, except as it might ...


7

This will not work with a tea-bag or any other kind of cloth. Unless it's enclosed in a very fine membrane the yeast would easily be able to get through, then disperse and propogate in the main liquid. However, something like this can actually be done. Some homebrewers have taken a high-technology cue from industrial beer and do what's known as an ...


7

You're fine, no need to panic. Leave your beer alone for another 2-3 weeks. Seriously, don't touch it, look at it, think about it, etc. Just leave it be for as long as you can stand it, and bottle it after 2-3 have passed. Regarding the smell, fermenting beer throws off all kinds of crazy, nasty, wonderful, weird smells as part of the fermentation process. ...


7

Adding water to something will lower its gravity. When adding water to wort from a concentrated extract brew process its not uncommon for the two to not mix completely. When you added the water you turned over some of the wort and took a sample of something that was more dense than intended. No big deal. It will equilibrate and the fermentation action of ...


6

Having done both, I can tell you that sugar (corn or table, doesn't matter) is the way to go. It's easy reliable and tasteless. Priming with gyle (the name for what you propose) is uncertain and offers no advantage to your beer.


5

You actually have observed the most important sign of active fermentation, which is the kraeusen. Guarantee you've got a leak somewhere in your fermenter causing the airlock not to push. It's rarely worth judging the state of fermentation based on airlock activity anyway, as it's often very likely to lead you wrong. In conclusion: you're fine, do not chuck ...


5

For the benefit you'd gain from leaving your hydro in there (maybe saving some volume as you won't take samples) I think it wouldn't really be worth your time as I imagine it would be pretty difficult to read without having to clean it off. Also having to open up your fermentor each time to take a reading exposes the wort to possible infection. I usually ...


5

Specialty grains, extract vs. all-grain does not make a difference on fermentation time. The reason to avoid dry-hopping in primary is not for interference with fermentation, but the yeast and CO₂ production will separately steal a lot of hop character. There is something about overpitching yeast, but I wouldn't worry about it too much; if you're really ...


5

I recently turned around an AIPA in 8 days from brewing to drinking. The key was pitching an adequate amount of healthy yeast and carefully controlling fermentation temp. I ran at 63F for 3 days until FG was reached, raised to 70F for 1-2 days to complete fermentation, then crashed to 33 for 3 days to clear the beer, kegged and force carbed.


5

I think what you made is safe, but there's no way to not produce alcohol with that method.


5

That's an insane amount of yeast for a one gallon batch. Your yeast ate through all the sugar quickly, and now it probably doesn't have anything left to eat. Do you have a hydrometer? If you don't, get one. That way you'll be able to measure the amount of sugar before & after fermentation instead of just guessing. Don't start over, and don't buy a new ...


5

This is a totally normal active fermentation. It won't be flocculated yeast at this point, so much as break protein and hop material.


5

Like above, I've found corney kegs to be a great sealed aging container. Couple notes. I wouldn't allow any pressure in any glass carboy. Below is box from 6gal Italian glass carboy. ! PSI is pounds per square inch. Conditioning and secondary can easily make 2 bars, about 27psi. Because of the surface area a carboy would fail at a fraction of that. Plastic ...


4

I would give it another week, just to make sure the yeast is done, but I'm going to guess it won't drop down much lower, and will attribute that to: the slightly high mash temp; 10%+ Crystal malt; low initial yeast health from pitching just a vial instead of a starter.


4

The biggest issue in doing that is that krausen will get stuck to both your hydrometer and your carboy walls. Even if you wait for the krausen to die off before dumping your hydrometer in, you will still have a bit of a hard time reading it through the krausened carboy walls... But hey, go ahead and try! That is the essence of homebrewing.


4

Generally, most yeast created flavors will happen in the first 72 hours. After that (in general) you can start ramping up. You can also wait 4-5 days to be safe.


4

There's no reason to dump a beer that isn't contaminated. After 1.5 weeks and a trip to 80F, the beer should be done fermenting. And warm temps late in fermentation have little impact on flavor. You can try stirring up the yeast, but a re-pitch of active yeast is probably worth doing. If you can make a starter that would really help, since the partly ...


4

You need to determine if you have a wort problem or a yeast problem. The way to do that is with a fast ferment test (sometimes called forced ferment test). Put some of the wort in a small sanitized container. You need enough to be able to take a gravity reading. Add a LOT of yeast to the sample...even bread yeast is fine for this since we want to know if ...


4

I usually do 4/5gl in a 6gl carboy, not as a particular matter of "best", but just of convenience and what I acquired over time. You definitely want some headspace, if only to keep krausen under control and minimize the amount of blowoff you have to redirect somewhere. For more "productive" yeasts, I'll still use a blow-off tube, but if I under-collect ...


4

Using sugar is easier. There is no risk that you have too much gyle or too little. You can just buy extra sugar and be on the safe side. Gyle needs to be saved in sterile containers (I usually fill a few bottles with gyle while it's still boiling hot, which does the trick) and then kept in the fridge. You can just keep the sugar on the shelf. You can end up ...


4

First thing's first Bubbles are not an absolute indicator of fermentation. The most reliable way to tell if your fermentation is "done" is to use a hydrometer, and once you find you are getting consistent gravity over several days, then it has finished digesting sugars (still technically fermenting). Fermenting Hot, and what it means Fermenting on the ...


4

What you're looking to do is called high gravity brewing. This technique is oft employed by macro brewers to produce more beer with less fermenter space. They dilute after fermentation is complete. Some Useful Resources: Brew Your Own Article Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 1 Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 2 Some Considerations Yeast Health: ...


4

Short answer: sure, that is fine and jsled is absolutely right. Long answer: the other thing to consider is just don't bother with blowoff, which I assume is the reason for the bleach water setup, and just use an airlock. I think being really concerned with blowoff is probably a side-effect of following old Charlie Papazian instructions or people who ...


4

Don't worry so much. Put some sanitized foil over the top and wrap with a rubber band. If the beer is chilled to pitching temp before being transferred to the fermenter, air locks are absolutely unnecessary to keep beer from being contaminated.


4

The temp probe is most likely not waterproof, indeed. Many people place the temp probe on the side of the fermentor, with some insulation around it to try to isolate the fermentor-wall temperature from the ambient environment. You'll get close-enough to the wort temperature. You can also acquire a "thermowell": a hollow, capped stainless-steel tube which ...


4

No it wont. In fact it can break up yeast floculation and aid fermentation. There is risk of oxidation if much alcohol has been produced when it was shook. But the c02 in headspace should minimize it. I once fermented a 5 gal 1.086 apple wine to 0.992 in a couple days on a stirpate to completely deny the yeast floculation.


3

There is no particular reason I am aware of that normal fermentations for extract vs. all-grain brews should be different. Perhaps some examples that you've noticed might help? Fermentation time is mostly a function of yeast health, wort oxygenation levels, yeast pitch rate, the gravity of the beer, and temperature. While extract might generally have less ...


3

When serving beer from a keg, there is no need to add sugar after fermentation, as you mentioned, no secondary fermentation occurs so it is not needed. Instead, you set the pressure of the CO2 in order to obtain the carbonation required at the serving temperatures. I personally use BeerSmith to calculate this value for me.


3

A couple of things First, the "funky bittery, acetone-ish" flavors are most likely fusel alcohols that yeast likes to throw off when it's under stress. One way to prevent this is to make sure it has enough nutrients (particularly nitrogen). In the mead world, this is usually resolved with the addition of nutrients such as Fermaid K and diammonium phosphate ...



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