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5

I would advise trying to siphon first. You can use one siphon on multiple carboys. This is a much more economical option to making or converting multiple glass secondary fermenters to have a spigot. Of course, thus assumes that you have more than one brew going at once. As you're new, this is mere conjecture. However, if you plan on being both wine and ...


5

The only issue with the grommet falling in is possible contamination depending on if there were any organisms on it (probably) and how strong your ferment is - sounds like you're at low or high krausen so you should be ok. The larger your yeast population and stronger it is, the greater chance they'll outcompete anything that gets in there at this stage. You ...


5

Given the recipe, that's exactly the sort of flavour I'd expect. I've never made this beverage, but I've made sauerkraut and it's done in an almost identical way except using cabbage instead of beets. The fermentation is bacterial, and lactobacilli play a predominant role. These bacteria produce lactic acid which is what makes sauerkraut sour, and presumably ...


5

Sorry to say that looks like the beginning of a pellicle, meaning your beer is infected. But if you drink it quickly, you may avoid the worst of it. Best case, it might even taste good! And NEVER put that heater in your beer! Put the beer in a tub of water and put the heater in the water.


5

First, there is almost never a need to use a secondary fermenter unless you add something to the beer that produces a true secondary fermentation. The idea of using a secondary on a regular basis comes from the commercial brewing industry. The fermenters homebrewers use are far smaller and the risk of autolysis is virtually nonexistent, unlike commercial ...


4

Well, here's my list of why it's a bad idea.... You will weaken the carboy and increase the risk of it breaking. You need to be able to keep the spigot sanitized throughout fermentation. Have you priced having custom carboys made? It's just unnecessary...siphoning isn't that hard to do. What you're looking at is dangerous, expensive and ...


4

Likely late in the game now, but you can also put oak chips on a sanitized cooking sheet at 200F or so and leave in the oven for 15 minutes or so. This will sanitize the chips, and subtly brings out some of the flavour, but not too much tannic or other astringent flavours. Essentially you are pasteurizing the oak chips by heating them to 138F (min), before ...


4

In short: use the same amount of yeast. You should use the correct amount of yeast for 5 gallons, either split between the two cornies or added to the batch before you split it. Dry yeast packets have (more than) enough cells for a 5 gallon batch. Liquid yeast smack packs generally do not have enough cells for 5 gallons of wort, which is why starters are ...


4

Sounds like a vigorous, but otherwise normal fermentation. Rack to secondary, if that's your process, or leave it in the carboy for another week or two before bottling. The krausen residue on the walls of the carboy won't affect the final beer. In the future you might consider using a blow-off tube instead of an airlock.


4

Your options are: Leave it: You have already put the effort in to make the brew so I would say just leave it until it is ready to bottle. Buy a second fermenter: then transfer the remaining beer to it after it has been cleaned and sterilized. Fix the leak: Depending on the size of the leak you could try to stem the flow with either vasonline, tape it up, ...


4

Well, it's either the yeast or the wort that's giving you the trouble. You can find out by doing a forced fermentation test - take a small amount of wort, and pitch a relatively large amount of yeast (e.g. 1/2 sachet of dry yeast.) Keep it at 75F or more so that the yeast ferment out any fermentable sugars. After at least 1 day, or once the yeast have ...


4

It sounds like you underpitched by quite a large amount. As for options, you have some: Pitch an ale yeast. You'll want to bring the temperature up to at least 17 C to keep the yeast happy. You'll end up with an ale, not a lager, but still a good beer. Raise the temperature for a short while. If you can bring the temperature up to 15 C, you should start to ...


4

Using any of those things to filter beer will badly oxidize it and ruin the flavor. I clear beer with time and cold temperature. A couple months at 35F will clear just about any beer. You can also use things like gelatin, Polyclar, or Biofine. If you want to filter you needs kegs and a CO2 setup to push the beer so you can do it in an enclosed manner and ...


4

Glass carboys are not rated for pressure, I would definitely not recommend trying it there. If fermenting or finishing in a metal vessel (like a corny keg), you can use a spunding valve to control the amount of pressure in the keg to force carbonation, similar to actively adding CO₂ to the keg to force carbonate after fermentation. It's a practice born out ...


4

I get the same kraeusen when using liquid yeast - it's not from hydration shock. In fact, the dead yeast that don't survive hydration simply fall to the bottom of the fermentor. The reason for the kraeusen is the constant churning of the wort during active fermentation, which mixes proteins, tannins and hop-alpha acids to create the structure for the ...


4

You have the potential for oxidized beer. It may not happen, or if it does it may not be too bad. But the best thing to do would be to drink the beer soon, before potential oxidation has a chance to get worse.


3

For this situation, you may want to consider yeast strains where extra phenol and ester production due to a stressful environment is considered a good thing in the final product. Typically Belgian yeast strains are more tolerable of stressful environments, in fact some brewers intentionally raise the temperature of their belgian ales in order to get the ...


3

I too was curious about this the other day. Turns out for five gallons/18.9 L of 1.060 wort at 75% apparent attenuation, 449.1 L/ 15.86 cubic feet/ 118.64 gal of CO2 is produced (standard temperature and pressure. This amounts to 0.88 kg/ 1.94 lb of CO2! I have a few charts for different gravities and apparent attenuations at my blog post about it. I ...


3

They're trying to make one simple, common set of instructions that satisfy both a large range of beers as well as a huge variability in customers, across the dimensions primarily of: inherent yeast performance, yeast health, lag time, fermentation temperature and adherence to instructions/technique, including a comfortable margin of "safety". In short: ...


3

Once you reach the final gravity, you can cool down your beer to get the yeast to drop out and clarify the beer. At 30F, it will probably take 3 days or so. You'll see it happen. The beer will not freeze. It will noticeably clarify your beer, but if you can't do it, don't sweat it. You can also do it after the beer has been sitting on the fruit instead ...


3

The two you will want to use are either Wyeast 3763 Roeselare blend, or WLP655 Belgian Sour mix. If you want to get real squirrely, follow the Mad Fermentationist's lead and go grab a (fresh) bottle or two of your favorite sours from the store, smoothly pour out all but the last half inch of the bottle, swirl the dregs settled at the bottom of the bottle, ...


3

The grommet is already in the fermenter now so I wouldn't worry about trying to get it out. That will increase the risk of infection. If you cleaned and sterilized it only a few days ago it should be fine unless you were touching it with dirty hands or a bug landed on the grommet or something like that. The airlock is meant to be a one way valve that lets ...


3

I use bottled water frequently without any problems, so I don't think that's your problem. When you say fermentation stopped, are you basing that on a gravity reading or just observation? Fermentation can be continuing even if it doesn't appear that it is. The only way to know for sure is to take a gravity reading.


3

A few thoughts, and I hope I can answer your question in the process: The only fermentables to speak of will be your malt extracts — the other grain is just adjuncts and will not contribute a significant amount of long-chain sugars for fermentation. So you can pretty much rule out the mash. But as to your malt extract, is it fresh? Do you have any reason ...


3

No, I don't think the fill level on an airlock is going to prevent bubbling. Short answer, but I don't think there is more to it. Edit: I found time to respond in more detail. I experienced the same thing (no bubbling, but pressing on lid squeezes out bubbles) in two-gallon bucket fermenters, so I looked carefully at the airlocks to see if over- or ...


3

You can certainly try it. That's the major advantage of homebrewing. However, just because these beers are coming prepackaged nowadays doesn't mean that's the way its done in the place of origin. These things evolved really as beer cocktails. I think its far better to just add the lemonade to the beer in the glass. That way you have great beer to begin ...


3

At this point you don't know if the fermentation is stuck or finished. Despite the yeast attenuation rating, it's the fermentability of the wort that determines attenuation. Alcohol tolerance is not the problem. More yeast might help or it might not. Before you do anything you should try a fast ferment test to determine if there are any more fermentable ...


3

I recently brewed a 14% RIS using a similar technique - I started out with S-04, and then used WLP099 to continue where that couldn't. Since the WLP090 yeast strain has a high alcohol tolerance, you only need the WLP099 if you're talking abv levels above around 13%. I think your plan sounds about right - although I would use more WLP090 and less WLP099, or ...


3

I'd just remove the lid and set it lightly on top, or cover the fermenter with foil or plastic wrap. Many breweries use open fermentation. Your will have a loose covering and the krausen will protect the beer. Resecure the lid once the krausen drops.


3

Fermented beer contains somewhere around 0.8 volumes of CO₂. When you rack to secondary, you're certainly causing some (however minimal) agitation of the beer, which will cause some CO₂ to be released. You may also be changing temperature, which might cause some CO₂ to be released. And dry-hopping is going to give tons of nucleation sites for CO₂, which will ...



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