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7

Adding water to something will lower its gravity. When adding water to wort from a concentrated extract brew process its not uncommon for the two to not mix completely. When you added the water you turned over some of the wort and took a sample of something that was more dense than intended. No big deal. It will equilibrate and the fermentation action of ...


6

I think what you made is safe, but there's no way to not produce alcohol with that method.


6

Having done both, I can tell you that sugar (corn or table, doesn't matter) is the way to go. It's easy reliable and tasteless. Priming with gyle (the name for what you propose) is uncertain and offers no advantage to your beer.


6

No it wont. In fact it can break up yeast floculation and aid fermentation. There is risk of oxidation if much alcohol has been produced when it was shook. But the c02 in headspace should minimize it. I once fermented a 5 gal 1.086 apple wine to 0.992 in a couple days on a stirpate to completely deny the yeast floculation.


6

Depends on batch size. If your doing 2-3 gallons. I would recommend using glass 1 gallon jugs from wine or Apple juice. The cheeseball containers I believe are made from the same foodgrade plastic as 2 liter soda bottles. They are novel in that they have more volume and a large opening for dry hopping. I think either would be a good fermentor untill you ...


6

If you live near a good juice bar or restuarant that serves smoothies, ask the sales clerk if they have any empty glass jugs. Many drinks have an apple juice base and organic apple juice often ships in 1 gallon glass jugs. I've found two shops that happily give the jugs away for free, though I usually buy a smoothie in gratitude. Being a tipping patron ...


5

There's no reason to dump a beer that isn't contaminated. After 1.5 weeks and a trip to 80F, the beer should be done fermenting. And warm temps late in fermentation have little impact on flavor. You can try stirring up the yeast, but a re-pitch of active yeast is probably worth doing. If you can make a starter that would really help, since the partly ...


5

What you're looking to do is called high gravity brewing. This technique is oft employed by macro brewers to produce more beer with less fermenter space. They dilute after fermentation is complete. Some Useful Resources: Brew Your Own Article Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 1 Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 2 Some Considerations Yeast Health: ...


5

That's an insane amount of yeast for a one gallon batch. Your yeast ate through all the sugar quickly, and now it probably doesn't have anything left to eat. Do you have a hydrometer? If you don't, get one. That way you'll be able to measure the amount of sugar before & after fermentation instead of just guessing. Don't start over, and don't buy a new ...


5

This is a totally normal active fermentation. It won't be flocculated yeast at this point, so much as break protein and hop material.


5

Like above, I've found corney kegs to be a great sealed aging container. Couple notes. I wouldn't allow any pressure in any glass carboy. Below is box from 6gal Italian glass carboy. ! PSI is pounds per square inch. Conditioning and secondary can easily make 2 bars, about 27psi. Because of the surface area a carboy would fail at a fraction of that. Plastic ...


4

Generally, most yeast created flavors will happen in the first 72 hours. After that (in general) you can start ramping up. You can also wait 4-5 days to be safe.


4

You need to determine if you have a wort problem or a yeast problem. The way to do that is with a fast ferment test (sometimes called forced ferment test). Put some of the wort in a small sanitized container. You need enough to be able to take a gravity reading. Add a LOT of yeast to the sample...even bread yeast is fine for this since we want to know if ...


4

I usually do 4/5gl in a 6gl carboy, not as a particular matter of "best", but just of convenience and what I acquired over time. You definitely want some headspace, if only to keep krausen under control and minimize the amount of blowoff you have to redirect somewhere. For more "productive" yeasts, I'll still use a blow-off tube, but if I under-collect ...


4

Using sugar is easier. There is no risk that you have too much gyle or too little. You can just buy extra sugar and be on the safe side. Gyle needs to be saved in sterile containers (I usually fill a few bottles with gyle while it's still boiling hot, which does the trick) and then kept in the fridge. You can just keep the sugar on the shelf. You can end up ...


4

First thing's first Bubbles are not an absolute indicator of fermentation. The most reliable way to tell if your fermentation is "done" is to use a hydrometer, and once you find you are getting consistent gravity over several days, then it has finished digesting sugars (still technically fermenting). Fermenting Hot, and what it means Fermenting on the ...


4

'Is it possible that fermentation completed in the four days at 68F before I dropped the temp too low?' It's definitely possible, though it's really impossible to tell without gravity readings. Bubbles in the airlock are a fairly unreliable way to gauge fermentation progress, as they can be cause by other things besides active fermentation (sometimes ...


4

Short answer: sure, that is fine and jsled is absolutely right. Long answer: the other thing to consider is just don't bother with blowoff, which I assume is the reason for the bleach water setup, and just use an airlock. I think being really concerned with blowoff is probably a side-effect of following old Charlie Papazian instructions or people who ...


4

It's rather high for a Dunkelweizen. I'd try gently swirling the fermentation vessel to get the yeast off of the bottom. Maybe up the fermentation temp a few degrees too. Do that and try taking some SG readings a couple of weeks later and see if you have got things moving along again. I'd worry that if fermentation is just stuck (and not finished) that ...


4

1.028 is ok, but generally only if you started A LOT higher. First; try moving the fermenter to a warmer area and give it a bit of a swirl/shake to rouse the yeast. See if that helps. Second: make a new yeast starter and pitch that. leave it for a while and see if it solves your problem. Three: Taste the beer. If it tastes good, bottle and enjoy, else, ...


4

Ginger juice alone does not have enough sugar to be fermentable. However, ginger beer is a popular, slightly alcoholic beverage made from ginger root, sugar, water and citric acid. Take a look at this question and answer.


4

Don't worry so much. Put some sanitized foil over the top and wrap with a rubber band. If the beer is chilled to pitching temp before being transferred to the fermenter, air locks are absolutely unnecessary to keep beer from being contaminated.


4

The temp probe is most likely not waterproof, indeed. Many people place the temp probe on the side of the fermentor, with some insulation around it to try to isolate the fermentor-wall temperature from the ambient environment. You'll get close-enough to the wort temperature. You can also acquire a "thermowell": a hollow, capped stainless-steel tube which ...


4

Yeast with a high floculation rate will do this, they usually break off the bottom and float up from trapped c02. Beer looks really clear, good job. When you rack to secondary, go ahead and let the floaters suck into the secondary, usually this is enough to break them up and let them settle. If you don't mind the extra loss you can leave them behind. ...


4

I use frozen fruit often. While it thaws mash it lightly to break it up, put on the bottom of the secondary and rack on top of it. This is the best I have found to get the most flavor.


4

Depend on a lot of factors. If it was in fermenter only two weeks, one or two more should not hurt. For light beers, under 6% ABV, I never kept them over a month. But I do have few fermenters 3 or 4 weeks old now, waiting to be bottled somewhere next week. Oldest is strongest, of course. For big beers, it was few months between pitch and bottling, and dang, ...


4

In general, fermenting lager yeast at room temperatures would result in off flavors due to esters, diacetyl, and other components. The "California Common" is an exception to this, and the standard explanation is that the yeast strain (Wyeast 2112 or WLP810) used for this style of beer can handle higher temperatures than most lager strains. Who knows, ...


3

It also doesn't hurt to start low, leave for a couple of days, increase, leave for a couple of days, etc. I usually don't increase it once I see krausen until the krausen starts to fall, but mosts ale yeasts say 65-75, but will ferment nice and clean down at ~60. This varies by yeast, but never hurts to start a bit low. Also, raising the temp a couple of ...


3

Adding hops late in the process is pretty common, it's called dry hopping. It's a great way to enhance the aroma of hops, without increasing the bitterness too much. It creates a nice fresh characteristic in the beer. Adding more yeast is not exactly common, but not unheard of. It can be used if the fermentation is stuck, and needs a kick. Sometimes yeast ...


3

Most likely a wild yeast infection which could easily contain some of those strains and have the potential to be a positive in a Berliner, or not...(plastic, bandaid, and phenolic flavors possible). It does Look like a pellicle for sure! I would say if it smells rancid don't try it, if it taste terrible don't drink it, that's the best advice given to me on ...



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