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6

This will not work with a tea-bag or any other kind of cloth. Unless it's enclosed in a very fine membrane the yeast would easily be able to get through, then disperse and propogate in the main liquid. However, something like this can actually be done. Some homebrewers have taken a high-technology cue from industrial beer and do what's known as an ...


5

You're fine, no need to panic. Leave your beer alone for another 2-3 weeks. Seriously, don't touch it, look at it, think about it, etc. Just leave it be for as long as you can stand it, and bottle it after 2-3 have passed. Regarding the smell, fermenting beer throws off all kinds of crazy, nasty, wonderful, weird smells as part of the fermentation process. ...


5

You actually have observed the most important sign of active fermentation, which is the kraeusen. Guarantee you've got a leak somewhere in your fermenter causing the airlock not to push. It's rarely worth judging the state of fermentation based on airlock activity anyway, as it's often very likely to lead you wrong. In conclusion: you're fine, do not chuck ...


4

For a typical 5% ABV beer, brewed between 16 and 20°C, allow 10-14 days for fermentation to stop, and few more days for the yeast to clear. But using bread yeast might get you a different result. Starting with about 10% sugar you would expect to get a 4-5% beer, but your yeast might have other ideas and quit before it gets that far. After the bubbling ...


3

When serving beer from a keg, there is no need to add sugar after fermentation, as you mentioned, no secondary fermentation occurs so it is not needed. Instead, you set the pressure of the CO2 in order to obtain the carbonation required at the serving temperatures. I personally use BeerSmith to calculate this value for me.


3

The beer did not finish fermenting during the first two weeks. This can happen if the yeast was not viable when pitched, or if it was stressed during fermentation. You almost certainly bottled the beer with unfermented malt sugars in it, in addition to the priming sugar that you added. There are two possible scenarios: The yeast is dead. In this scenario ...


3

You see this mostly in wine, cider and mead making because those sources of fermentable sugars lack some of the nutrients needed by yeast for proper fermentation, which are usually present in malt-based worts. They are (aside from fermentable sugars): Amino acids/nitrogen - All-malt worts supply plenty of readily assimilable nitrogen. This is a big need ...


3

It's great that you're excited about showing off your brew, but my one word answer is: WORRY. What you have in the bottles today should be as sweet as a coke. It's either full of dead yeast, and might carbonate slowly over a year. And then explode. Or worse yet the yeast is alive and trying to carbonate and will explode soon. If it ever gets near that ...


2

can't quite read the picture, and opening it in a window and zooming in made it fuzzy. Your final FG of 1.040 is a legitimate starting gravity for some beer. Category 16 judged styles can start @ 1.044 and higher. Jai alai cedar aged IPA clone FG should be around here. I could kind of make out our yeast, they expect 70% attenuation or so. this ...


2

Hop bitterness is relatively stable, falling off over the course of many months. Hop flavor and aroma is more volatile, falling off dramatically over the course of weeks, then more so over the course of months. If you want bright, high hop flavor and aroma, look into "dry-hopping", where hops are added to the post-fermented beer. This is pretty much ...


2

There is no particular reason I am aware of that normal fermentations for extract vs. all-grain brews should be different. Perhaps some examples that you've noticed might help? Fermentation time is mostly a function of yeast health, wort oxygenation levels, yeast pitch rate, the gravity of the beer, and temperature. While extract might generally have less ...


1

Cider smell can be caused by Acetaldehyde which can cause apple smells and flavours. As the beer hasn't been in the fermenter long, you will notice this smell will decrease as fermentation continues, and afterwards, when the yeast will continue to "clean-up" these compounds. http://www.howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-2.html


1

In addition to Franklin's answer, I would also say that if you are seein an active kraeusen with no airlock activity this early in fermentation it is fairly likely you may have a leak in your fermenter. Not knowing what you are using, I can tell you this has happened to me with plastic buckets. You should check your seal and make sure you have a good tight ...


1

Depending on how sturdy your bottles are you probably won't need to worry about exploding bottles. I would, however, keep them in a contained container (ie plastic bin) just in case. Since some funky things went on during this ambitious brew, I would also "rename" the beer. That way people don't compare it to something they might be familiar with. Letting ...


1

Did you add any yeast nutrients or raisins to the must? Honey and water sound like a feast for your yeast, but it is really like trying to eat three square meals at an ice-cream parlor. There is no real nutrition available. The normal practice with meads is to fortify the must with some packaged yeast-nutrient. The ancient practice is to throw a few ...


1

My co author, Drew Beechum, is pretty much recognized as the master of saison. In our book "Experimental Homebrewing" he writes about 565 and how temprementl it can be. For one thing, you need to raise the temp into the 80s after the first couple weeks in order to get the yeast to finish. That will clean up a lot of the diacxetyl. Most surprisingly, it's ...


1

As long as your yeast is healthy and abundant and you're not cold-crashing the beer as soon as fermentation tails off, you'll be fine. I've fermented with a number of Saison and Belgian strains (though I can't remember which off the top of my head) and I've never had any problems with diacetyl. Also, basically any strain that's known to produce diacetyl in ...


1

Using this list as a base for grains, I will try to come up with list of grains that have been fermented into alcohol. Everything in this list should be possible to ferment. The question is, has it? brewed Warm-season (C4) cereals finger millet "The grain is made into a fermented drink (or beer) in Nepal and in many parts of Africa" white fonio The ...



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