Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

The yeast need the oxygen to grow and reproduce, which is important for the first stage of primary fermentation when the yeast is multiplying and inhabiting your wort, which you want to happen as quickly as possible to avoid risk of infection when the wort is cool, exposed to air and does not yet have a protective yeast head. Unless you're brewing a high ...


2

Once fermentation has started it is usually not recommended to add oxygen. Exceptions: When brewing a high alcohol beer you may add oxygen up to 12 hours after pitching, but not afterwords. Yeast will consume oxygen during the initial fermentation phase. After that the oxygen stays around to stale your beer.


2

The best solution would be to try and direct the wild fermentation into a controlled one. The strange smell ("smells like goat" or garlic or bad eggs or rotten meat, depending on whom you ask) that you have may very well be what's called "Böckser" in German and "goût de bock" in French. I'm not aware of an English translation other than off-flavour. It ...


1

You can use Campden tablets (Potassium or Sodium Metabisulfite) or equivalent product available from your local home brew store, dissolved in a little water (and a bit added to each bottle), to inhibit wild yeast if you don't want any alcohol produced. I can't tell you the exact quantity you would need however.


1

Wild yeast must have gotten into the bottles, and yeast will ferment any simple sugar solution. Depending how long fermentation has been going you might already have some weird wild yeast-derived off-flavors, but hopefully you're catching this early enough to save the batch I would pasteurize them in the bottles to kill off the yeast: Place all of the ...


1

The wine will not start being poisonous after years of being in the bottle. If it is wood alcohol, it could, but if you know where it comes from, there is no harm in tasting it. If it does taste bad, pour it away and call it a day, if it tastes good, enjoy your fruit wine! TL;DR; It should be safe to drink.


1

My experience as as professional brewer and home brewer leads me to suggest that oxygen is not detrimental to beer flavor unless yeast activity is in decline (i.e., after vigorous fermentation has subsided). So if you have forgotten to oxygenate, go ahead and do so as long as your beer has yet to achieve high krausen.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible