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5

I think what you made is safe, but there's no way to not produce alcohol with that method.


4

You need to determine if you have a wort problem or a yeast problem. The way to do that is with a fast ferment test (sometimes called forced ferment test). Put some of the wort in a small sanitized container. You need enough to be able to take a gravity reading. Add a LOT of yeast to the sample...even bread yeast is fine for this since we want to know if ...


3

This previous question may help you a bit: Is brewers' Lactobacillus heterofermentative or homofermentative? This is taken for Wikipedia According to metabolism, Lactobacillus species can be divided into three groups: Obligately homofermentative (Group I) including: L. acidophilus, L. delbrueckii, L. helveticus, L. salivarius Facultatively ...


3

There's no reason to dump a beer that isn't contaminated. After 1.5 weeks and a trip to 80F, the beer should be done fermenting. And warm temps late in fermentation have little impact on flavor. You can try stirring up the yeast, but a re-pitch of active yeast is probably worth doing. If you can make a starter that would really help, since the partly ...


3

Basically, you don't need to worry about it. I add coffee beans without any sanitation at all. I've even added unsanitized mushrooms right out of the woods without problem. By the time you add that stuff, there's not only alcohol n the beer, but it has a low pH. Those two things combine to make it very resistant to infection.


2

These yeast started out with a similar roots s.cerevisiae and diverged some time around the 15th Century, when it is thought to have hybridized with a new world yeast(Saccharomyces eubayanus). It is then likely that the yeast harvesting methods of different brewing techniques progressively selected for more specific varieties. In British and similar ...


2

Yes. You'll likely be fully fermented within 1 week, if you have a healthy pitch of yeast. Two weeks should be more than enough. Gravity readings are your best option to understanding fermentation/attenuation, here.


2

The Wyeast smack packs have a small nutrient pouch inside the main pouch (which contains the yeast slurry). The nutrients will cause the yeast to "wake up" and consume the sugars in the nutrient liquid, causing the swelling. However, this is a function not only of the yeast, but also of the date of manufacture, the viability/vitality of the yeast and the ...


1

Depending on the type of temperature probe, you could use 2 of them in parallel, one in the middle of the wort and one taped to the side of the vessel to get a rough "average" of the reading of the two probes. Use the same probe type, wire, and wire length to help eliminate any difference in resistance that would affect the reading. Mathematically it won't ...


1

The temperature will vary, but as fermentation proceeds we will be generating CO2 which aids convection within the fermenter. As such you should not see a large difference, but if you see any then measure 1/2 way.


1

I will state up front that I don't brew lagers, but I believe this information applies to both lagers and ales. Most ester (or ester precursor) production occurs during yeast reproduction. Since this happens early on in the fermentation process, you likely can't do much to stop it now. You also can't reverse it once it is done. According to this article, ...


1

I would worry about that smell. Several of my local home brewers have made plastic flavored beer, it doesn't go away, just gets stronger. When it happened to me, the beer went away, and the fermenter too.


1

What kind of water do you brew with? Chlorinated tap water can cause a rubber-like (Chlorophenol) taste or smell. If you pass tap water through a chlorine-removing filter, it might be time for a filter change.


1

Try getting the must pH to greater than 5,aim for around 5.4. Then add some extra yeast. Only do this if your addition of CaCO3 was not successfully fixed the pH.


1

Most likely a wild yeast infection which could easily contain some of those strains and have the potential to be a positive in a Berliner, or not...(plastic, bandaid, and phenolic flavors possible). It does Look like a pellicle for sure! I would say if it smells rancid don't try it, if it taste terrible don't drink it, that's the best advice given to me on ...



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