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4

Generally, most yeast created flavors will happen in the first 72 hours. After that (in general) you can start ramping up. You can also wait 4-5 days to be safe.


3

It also doesn't hurt to start low, leave for a couple of days, increase, leave for a couple of days, etc. I usually don't increase it once I see krausen until the krausen starts to fall, but mosts ale yeasts say 65-75, but will ferment nice and clean down at ~60. This varies by yeast, but never hurts to start a bit low. Also, raising the temp a couple of ...


2

In addition to BBS's answer (this will lower your OG), filling past the 5 gallon mark will further reduce the amount of headspace in your carboy/bucket. Some yeast require more room than others, and you could end up clogging up your airlock or losing more beer out a blowoff tube. My advice would be to target a specific gravity rather than a specific volume. ...


2

There's certainly nothing that's going to stop you, and everything will probably turn out fine if you make no changes to your recipe and just throw in an extra 1/4 gallon at the end. But you are diluting your wort a bit, so you're decreasing your OG. You could attempt to increase your OG by a minor amount, but that will be a little more difficult since ...


2

A little worried, perhaps, but regardless you should attempt to keep the yeast/beer itself in the yeast's ideal temperature range. If you have a temp controller, then look into getting some sort of "thermowell" to put the temp controller's sensor in the middle of the fermentor itself, but taping (and insulting) the probe against the side of the fermentor ...


2

Adding hops late in the process is pretty common, it's called dry hopping. It's a great way to enhance the aroma of hops, without increasing the bitterness too much. It creates a nice fresh characteristic in the beer. Adding more yeast is not exactly common, but not unheard of. It can be used if the fermentation is stuck, and needs a kick. Sometimes yeast ...


1

I don't think that there will be a time where fermentation is still ongoing, but that there will be no off flavors generated. As I understand it, what's going on when a brewer raises the temperature for a time during fermentation, they are allowing for the generation of some off flavors. It will either fit the style of the beer, or if enough of the ...


1

The open fermenter may ferment cooler due to the insulation of a lid, just as a pan with a lid on boils faster, but I can see the difference being huge. that is all things being equal. One difference that could potentially affect things regarding temperature would be the availability of dissolved oxygen, with more O2 available the yeast should be able to ...


1

Grape skins have wild yeast on them that will, in time, ferment the grape juice. Depending on the particular blend of yeast on your grapes, you may get complete fermentation, or the yeast may have low alcohol tolerance and the fermentation will halt before all the sugars have been consumed. Yeast contribute to the flavour profile of the wine, and ...


1

I have a Picobrew Zymatic and tried following their instructions for the first few brews. The results were rather disappointing. Since I know the people at Picobrew, I talked to them about it. It seems that the method is a kinda beginner's least possible effort method, rather than something they specifically recommend or that anyone there does. I went ...


1

For fermenting, I just remove the gas-in keg post, fit a 1/2" hose onto the screw fitting, clamp it, and stick the other end of the hose in a glass filled with starsan. When fermentation's done, I replace the gas-in post and push to another (purged) keg. My fermentation keg's dip tube is a couple inches shorter than a regular one - that's how I avoid ...


1

Here is my simple recipe for home-made wine using readily available ingredients. - 2 cans frozen grape juice concentrate - 2 cups sugar - 1 pkg Lalvin EC-1118 wine yeast (beer/wine shop or internet) Follow instructions for rehydrating yeast on package. While waiting on yeast, pour both cans of juice concentrate into a 1 gallon container and add sugar. add ...



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