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5

40 degrees is quite a bit lower than the bottom range for your yeast. I'd expect that they've gone pretty much inactive. But don't worry! All you need to do to reactivate them is to warm your brew back up to the optimal temperature and provide some gentle agitation. Be careful not to splash! As fermentation has already stated, you don't want to add any ...


4

In the first stage of fermentation it could be some good. Yeast needs oxygen to the growth phase, when building membrane and other things needed to increase the cell count. When this oxygen is over, then the yeast can take its anaerobian way, and produce alcohol and carbon dioxide, which is needed for beer making. But if you shake your wort vigorously some ...


4

Temperature would be my first bet. You didn't mention what temperature you experienced during your primary fermentation. If your temperature was appropriate for the champagne yeast, then my next bet would be that your OG was not very high; therefore your yeast ate up what little sugar was present in a comparatively short time. Did you augment the bananas ...


2

At this point in the process, you're pretty much committed to letting the ferment continue to completion. With fruit wine, the usual course of action is to add meta-bisulphite to the juice or pulp, and leave it for 24 hours before adding the yeast. The sulphite reduces the activity of wild yeasts and bacteria, giving the brewer's yeast a head start. If the ...


1

Many factors: Was the 2nd yeast of the same lot code?! Yeast is finicky and may simply not react the same way twice if anything is even slightly different in your mix. Was the malt extract exactly the same as the 1st batch? Dry vs. liquid, fresh vs. 2 years old? Anything different in how you prepared additions like Chrystal malt, etc.? Any differences in ...


1

Use a sterile wine thief to get a sample and take a specific gravity of your current product. How does it compare to the final gravity of your previous batch. Since fermentation is still proceeding, we can guess that you haven't reached your target gravity yet. Which means the krausen is heavier that it was last time... Possible causes... Did you use ...


1

Your must is basically simple sugar and entirely fermentable. Your temps may be a little high so the yeast worked quickly. I'd be sure to leave the whole thing for a couple weeks to allow the yeast time to clean up some of the bi-products of fermentation. Then I'd rack to a new container for a longer aging period. Taste it then to see how it tastes. If ...


1

I don't know the answer, but vibration and agitation are not the same thing. I don't think the vibration from the washer will do much to keep yeast in suspension. I do think I read once that vibration can stress yeast out. But at what frequency I don't think that is clear.


1

I would also be concerned with the washing machine's effect on your wort temperature. If you use hot water "for your whites", that heat will rise, right into your fermenter. Where I live, (Florida) keeping the wort cool is a real challenge, especially during the first few days of fermenting when the alcholol level is not yet high enough to limit yeast ...


1

Idiot-proofing the fermentation temperatures has been a bit of a peeve of mine right now, as I use a family member's basement as a brewery and I have little control of the ambient room temperature. The DIY solution I am working on uses a $15 digital thermostat/controller with a sinkable probe from Ebay to switch on/off a typical brewing heat belt (a ...



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