Hot answers tagged

4

In general, fermenting lager yeast at room temperatures would result in off flavors due to esters, diacetyl, and other components. The "California Common" is an exception to this, and the standard explanation is that the yeast strain (Wyeast 2112 or WLP810) used for this style of beer can handle higher temperatures than most lager strains. Who knows, ...


2

Most lagers need to ferment below 55°F during growth phase to reduce esters and fusel alcohols. Diacetyl Rest Towards the end of the feeding phase (last couple days of primary) the temperature is raised to low ale temps 65-72° for a couple days, this gives the yeast a boost in metabolism to clean up Diacetyl. So heat is a good thing at one point in the ...


1

Wort It will be good, if you will have a good way to stir. In 30 liters I found temperature differences of more than 20°C to be possible, and ones around 5-10°C to be pretty common. So make sure some kind of automatic stir is there, or heat really, really slowly. Safety Be sure to use system that, if probe is short circuited or missing, switches off ...


1

Osmotic pressure does retard cell devision in most micro organisms making it hard to grow "in" a dense solution but they will have no problem growing "on" such a solution. High sugar content does little to inhibit growth of bacteria and yeast as long as it's still a solution and not a "gel". That being said, you can sour your juices you mentioned with lacto ...


1

"Is this required for the beer to be fermented properly?" No, it should be fermented fully within a couple weeks at most, though Belgian yeast can be a bit finicky. However the bigger issue is conditioning time. Belgian quads are usually ~11+%ABV. If you drink that two weeks after fermentation is done, it'll probably taste a bit like gasoline (a lot of ...


1

Matter cannot be created nor destroyed So really the only calorie loss during fermentation is that in which the yeast burn and what is concentrated from the loss of c02 escaping. Ethanol has 6.9 calories per gram Sugar has 4 calories per gram Here is a calculator http://realbeer.com/spencer/attenuation.html#calories If you play with the numbers for ...


1

Well in your specific kombucha I won’t be able to tell you but I can give you some math that should help you figure it out and should be able to be used by any brewer to figure out the caloric effect of fermentation on your brews. So just to hit you with the math right now and ill break it down later the equation to figure out the change in calories caused ...


1

It would need some Amino Acids, or at least some nitrogenous compounds to make AAs from. It would ferment some what with out, but it will need some nitrogenous compounds to grow and thrive.


1

Airlock activity is not the be-all end-all. You could have a bad seal on a bucket or on the airlock grommet itself. Give it a little time (3-4 days) then check the gravity. Gravity movement is really the only 100% reliable way to test if the yeast is working.


1

Sounds like everything is doing fine. 8 hours of lag time isn't bad at all. Extra headspace has no effect on actual fermentation and little effect on air lock activity, though c02 does slightly fit in between molecules in air as it mixes, it's so small it's only a matter of note for novelty.


1

Fermentation needs lots of oxygen. What I usually do in my 10 l batch is to shake my fermentation vat to add more oxygen to the wort before pitching the yeat and put the air lock on the vat. I assume you started your yeast before pitching it. I once did not do that and sprinkled the dry yeats over the wort as per instructions on the package, however, it ...


1

If I remeber correctly you have the 1 gal. glass carboy and ran a tube from the lid into a pot of sanitized solution. After the bubbling slowed the airlock was supposed to go on. What youre seeing is Krauzen - totally normal amd will sink to the bottom. You should be storing your fermentables in a dark place that stays around 60-70 F ...think cupboard or ...


1

I always leave the lid of the fermentor on loose, covering the bin so that no bacteria, mold etc will fall in but allowing the air to circulate for the first 24 hours until a nice kraussen has formed then seal it up. I used to seal it up tight on day 0 for the fear of the air getting in, but after reading Yeast by Chris White I changed my tune entirely and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible