New answers tagged

0

My first brew was a Pale Ale and I used Safale US-05. From what I read, fermenting outside the range recommended by the manufacturer should give you some off flavors, but since my temperature controller hadn't arrived in time for my first brew, I fermented at room temperature ~25-26°C and it was fine.


1

The utility of ramping up temperature can change wildly depending on yeast strain, pitch rate, wort composition, the fermentation temperature and much more. I wouldn't necessarily pin it to dark ales, but as you mention British Ale yeast, I'll speak to it from that stand point. Fermentation does create some of its own heat. As the fermentation winds down ...


1

There are many benefits in having accurate control over the temperature of your brew. It allows you to control many variables. You can: control the ester profile alter the speed of fermentation improve the health of your yeast speed up the clearing of your brew Lets look at 1, for the first 3 days you get the majority of your yeast reproduction, ...


0

I use Safale US-05 often and go with a temperature of 66-68 degrees. I keep a digital thermometer in my brew/fermentation bag and throw in a couple of small frozen water bottles. I check it about every 12 hours or so and once I get to 68 degrees I replace the bottles. But as most have already said, that works for me.


1

Agreement with the two answers so far from EvilZymurgist and brewchez, but to address the dry hopping portion of the question: you should dry hop basically at fermentation temps, or, at least, not at cold-crash/serving temps, to maximize hop extraction.


2

There isn't an ideal temp for any of this. There is a recommended range offered by the manufacturer to help guide the end user towards a higher degree of success that something will ferment. As for US-05 yeast, I've heard of people using it at weird temps outside the "recommended" range and having success. But success for them may be different than ...


2

Most Ales do well at 68°F primary, to limit phenols and undesirable esters made by yeast during growth phase. Secondary can go up to the higher end of recommended temp of a strain since there isn't much left for yeast to feed on and it's at this time the yeast consume those byproducts made in primary. So the higher temp encourages yeast metabolism. There ...



Top 50 recent answers are included