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5

40 degrees is quite a bit lower than the bottom range for your yeast. I'd expect that they've gone pretty much inactive. But don't worry! All you need to do to reactivate them is to warm your brew back up to the optimal temperature and provide some gentle agitation. Be careful not to splash! As fermentation has already stated, you don't want to add any ...


3

It uses peltier devices - a thermoelectric cooling/heating device - when a current is applied they chill on one side and warm the other. They're quite common but relatively inefficient in terms of energy compared to a compressor that you'd find in a fridge. Their efficiency is based on how quickly you can dissipate the heat generated. Thermal design is a key ...


3

I believe with all homebrewing that there is never a wasted batch, even the worst of the worst is an opportunity to learn something, so don't throw it out yet. You were lucky it was so late in the fermentation. The yeast won't die at the high temperature, and at this stage you may find you increased attenuation slightly. If a gravity reading indicates ...


3

You have to base the choice on what temp you want to ferment at, not necessarily an analytical choice in the optimum range. Different points in that range will create certain flavor profiles, all temps will make beer. The profile you want comes from experience. You need to remember that the fermentation itself generates heat. I am sure that your temp ...


2

1) Do I raise after 3 days or some other amount? (Rule of thumb here as I'm not going to take gravity readings) Assuming you aren't taking gravity readings, therefor you aren't examining the apparent attenuation, your best bet is to wait until after high-krausen. This really depends on the gravity of the beer, what yeast your using (ale vs. lager, fast ...


2

Yes, pitching yeast well below its optimum temperature and allowing it to rise will increase the lag time as opposed to pitching it at the optimum temperature. One thing to avoid is pitching room temperature yeast into cold wort, or vice-versa. This will shock the yeast and potentially cause issues with fermentation depending on the extent of the ...


2

Those temps are close enough together that it really doesn't make much difference which you choose. If I had to choose, though, I'd go with the recipe. The temps recommended by yeast manufacturers are very approximate and often too high.


1

14C is 57F or so. That awfully cool for an ale yeast. Even 16C is only 60F. That's still below their recommended range. While it may be recommended to ferment at lower temperatures, 4C/8F lower than WL's recommended minimum will definitely slow, and possibly halt, fermentation. You said that initial fermentation was "extremely vigorous" so this drop in ...


1

I just kicked a keg of Helles fermented with WLP940, great yeast! I pitched at 46°F and let it ramp up to 48°F for primary. I used this quick lager method and the beer was fantastic just 3 weeks later.


1

No, it won't. Yeast companies generally overestimate the high end temps. They tell you where the yeast will work best, not necessarily the temps that make the best beers. And no matter what the high end is, you'll always get better results by pitching at the low end (or below) of the stated temp range. The first 72 hours are the most critical. If you ...


1

Premature staling? Ideally, once fermentation is finished, after bright storage, filtering, priming, packaging, &c., beer would stay in a cool, dark location until consumed, with no temperature changes or shocks. Why do you want to raise the temperature, and to what value? And why 3 weeks?


1

The main point of raising the temp is simple. As the sugars become limiting the yeast begin to enter a dormancy phase. As yeast slow down the temp of your fermentation begins to lower too. That lowering temp is also a signal to yeast to go dormant. This causes a cyclical effect of potential having the yeast drop out sooner than you want and you do not ...


1

You may misunderstand what that temp range means. It's where the yeast company has determined you'll get optimum performance. Being outside of that range doesn't mean the yeast won't work. The effects are likely to be minimal to none.


1

I would take a gravity reading - depending upon what you brewed fermentation may already be over. In which case cold crashing would have been the right thing to do. Or you can raise the temperature of the yeast again and rouse the beer to help get the yeast back into conditioning the beer for another week. With temperature control, I've found that ...


1

Yes, wrapping the carboy in a towel will act as insulation and retain some of the heat. Fermwrap's do require some amount of trial and error to find their sweet spots. Keep in mind that while the Fermwrap is powered on, it is actively generating heat. Immediately cut the power, and while it is no longer generating heat, the wrap itself is still warm, ...


1

In order: WLP004 and 1084 are actually the same yeast. Slightly different environments and /or methods of analysis probably account for the slightly different specs from each manufacturer. Yeast is a living thing after all. Your own brewing environment and methods will affect attenuation more than WhiteLabs vs WYeast will. If you're going for dry, read ...


1

You should try to raise the temperature of the beer back up to around 68F/20C, and give it a gentle shake to try to get the yeast resuspended. Note that you will see airlock activity - this doesn't necessarily mean fermentation has started, but that the higher temperature is causing the gas in the headspace to expand and exit the airlock. Leave it for ...


1

Partly it depends on the yeast. Westmalle (WLP 550, Wy 3787) is notorious for flocculating in the middle of a fermentation if it gets too cold, and thereafter being impossible to rouse. At that point, re-pitching is the only option. It can also very easily take off and get too hot--I've had 80F+ with it. Water bath is the best bet for that yeast. But it's ...



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