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8

After 9 days, primary is pretty close to done if not already complete. Yeast activity is starting to slow anyways. The 10° drop to 59° May have caused the yeast to floculate and settle down (cold crash) prematurely. Warm it back up 2° an hour and give the fermentor a gentle swirl to get yeast back into suspension. All in all, you didn't hurt anything. ...


7

Most Ales do well at 68°F primary, to limit phenols and undesirable esters made by yeast during growth phase. Secondary can go up to the higher end of recommended temp of a strain since there isn't much left for yeast to feed on and it's at this time the yeast consume those byproducts made in primary. So the higher temp encourages yeast metabolism. There ...


5

Firstly, stop opening it, you looking at it isn't going to make anything good happen and could potentially lead to an infection. Try to get it somewhere warmer, assuming it's an ale yeast (you didn't say what type of yeast you were using) try to get it to 65-70F. Swirl it very gently a few times when it's in the warmer area to try to get the yeast active ...


4

Nope. Beer will fight very hard to be beer. :) Your beer will not taste exactly like planned, but if it is bubbling then you are off to a good start. Kolsch uses a lager yeast and they are happy with the colder temps. As the beer warms up the yeast will also warm up and work faster, but keep the temps reasonable! A lower amount of water will mean that ...


4

There isn't an ideal temp for any of this. There is a recommended range offered by the manufacturer to help guide the end user towards a higher degree of success that something will ferment. As for US-05 yeast, I've heard of people using it at weird temps outside the "recommended" range and having success. But success for them may be different than ...


4

Most bad esters are made during growth phase and early fermentation, it's only at the end of primary fermentation that you do your diacetyl rest, after the risks of undesirable esters has past.


4

In general, fermenting lager yeast at room temperatures would result in off flavors due to esters, diacetyl, and other components. The "California Common" is an exception to this, and the standard explanation is that the yeast strain (Wyeast 2112 or WLP810) used for this style of beer can handle higher temperatures than most lager strains. Who knows, however,...


3

Agreement with the two answers so far from EvilZymurgist and brewchez, but to address the dry hopping portion of the question: you should dry hop basically at fermentation temps, or, at least, not at cold-crash/serving temps, to maximize hop extraction.


3

There are many benefits in having accurate control over the temperature of your brew. It allows you to control many variables. You can: control the ester profile alter the speed of fermentation improve the health of your yeast speed up the clearing of your brew Lets look at 1, for the first 3 days you get the majority of your yeast reproduction, ...


3

It should start fermenting after warming up. The temperature it dropped to is well above refrigerator temperature and yeast will survive being in the fridge. If it doesn't start you can pitch new yeast.


3

Moving the beer from the fridge to the closet is preferred. Yeast are sensitive to temperature changes, they handle going from cold to warm much better. Starting your fermentation at 23 C, while not terribly hot, will risk fusel alcohol production as the yeast are in a more hospitable environment and will consume the sugars more rapidly (by using these ...


3

Yeas, moving what's in the fridge to the closet is a good plan. Temp control is most crucial for the first 3-4 days. After that, I always increase the temp to ensure complete fermentation.


2

I use one of these seedling heat mats as my heat source inside a freezer. They're built to have stuff sitting on top of them, they're water resistant, and they heat gently. Seems pretty safe to me. That said, you can make any of these options much safer by plugging your temperature controller into a GFCI outlet.


2

I use a wine fridge that I took the shelves out of. I can fit a 5 gallon fermenter into it. It has a digital temp display on the front and I set that to the temp I want, it works well for the German lagers I make. Most wne fridges I looked at when I was after one had a flat bottom big enough to take a 5 gallon fermenter.


2

Each yeast strain has an ideal temperature range to limit bad esters and phenols. Too hot can give the yeast too much room to play, while this is great for yeast health and reproduction they will produce esters that may not be desired, also larger molecule alcohols (fusels). So the temp is limited to isolate them to a specific metabolism that produces more ...


2

The utility of ramping up temperature can change wildly depending on yeast strain, pitch rate, wort composition, the fermentation temperature and much more. I wouldn't necessarily pin it to dark ales, but as you mention British Ale yeast, I'll speak to it from that stand point. Fermentation does create some of its own heat. As the fermentation winds down ...


2

Most lagers need to ferment below 55°F during growth phase to reduce esters and fusel alcohols. Diacetyl Rest Towards the end of the feeding phase (last couple days of primary) the temperature is raised to low ale temps 65-72° for a couple days, this gives the yeast a boost in metabolism to clean up Diacetyl. So heat is a good thing at one point in the ...


2

I would just put a self-advesive style thermometer on the jug ($4.00). Then keep it in a cool dark place where it will hold 65-72°. With just a 1 gallon volume and a lot of glass surface area heatsinking the wort it will be pretty accurate without having to be in the wort. A brew Pi, or T1000 temp controller works if you have refridgeration for it to ...


1

The kind of thing you seem to be in need of is a BrewPi. Basically the Pi, temp sensors, relays for heater/fridge and software to hook it all together in a nice little package. You would likely have to make an extra hole for a temp probe, but rather than using epoxy for the probe try to find a small rubber grommet, you can often find these in home brew ...


1

Wort It will be good, if you will have a good way to stir. In 30 liters I found temperature differences of more than 20°C to be possible, and ones around 5-10°C to be pretty common. So make sure some kind of automatic stir is there, or heat really, really slowly. Safety Be sure to use system that, if probe is short circuited or missing, switches off ...


1

My first brew was a Pale Ale and I used Safale US-05. From what I read, fermenting outside the range recommended by the manufacturer should give you some off flavors, but since my temperature controller hadn't arrived in time for my first brew, I fermented at room temperature ~25-26°C and it was fine.


1

I use Safale US-05 often and go with a temperature of 66-68 degrees. I keep a digital thermometer in my brew/fermentation bag and throw in a couple of small frozen water bottles. I check it about every 12 hours or so and once I get to 68 degrees I replace the bottles. But as most have already said, that works for me.


1

If you're using a malt extract then there isn't really much you can do to make an unfermentable wort. Warm it up, it will start fermenting. It helps to have one of those stick on thermometers on the side of your fermentation vessle.


1

A keggarator is a good choice, if it's not in use for serving. I have an old BevAir it fits two 6g Itialian carboys nicely. If you have a good back, deep freezers work nice too. As far as a flat bottom fridge, all of them I've seen converted usually have a DIY second bottom to make it level. Whatever you choose you will need to add a digital temp ...


1

Lower temp will give a cleaner flavour with fewer yeast generated esters. If you are up at 27C then you may get banana/clove flavours, which can be awesome if that is what you want. For a clean crisp mead that doesn't hide the character of the honey used I would suggest ~17C. It will take a few days longer to fully ferment all of the sugars at a lower ...


1

Natural yeasts like natural temps :p I would recommend ale fermentation temps, somewhere between 16 C and 20 C. You can go higher, but that will give you higher alcohols. Going colder will probably make the yeast go to sleep.


1

As it is the stage which contains the majority of the activity (the first 3-4 days 90% of fermentable sugars are consumed), it is also the stage when the majority of waste products are produced by the yeast. The temperature control over this period plus the variety of yeast used will have the largest affect on the flavour profile of the beverage. Obviously ...


1

I also use a water bath for controlling fermentation temps. I found a bluetooth weatherhawk temperature sensor that reports to a mobile app and it is waterproof. So I built an stc 1000 temp controller to selectively switch between an aquarium heater & small recirc pump on the hot side and a peltier liquid chiller on the cold side.


1

Depending on the type of temperature probe, you could use 2 of them in parallel, one in the middle of the wort and one taped to the side of the vessel to get a rough "average" of the reading of the two probes. Use the same probe type, wire, and wire length to help eliminate any difference in resistance that would affect the reading. Mathematically it won't ...


1

The temperature will vary, but as fermentation proceeds we will be generating CO2 which aids convection within the fermenter. As such you should not see a large difference, but if you see any then measure 1/2 way.



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