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8

After 9 days, primary is pretty close to done if not already complete. Yeast activity is starting to slow anyways. The 10° drop to 59° May have caused the yeast to floculate and settle down (cold crash) prematurely. Warm it back up 2° an hour and give the fermentor a gentle swirl to get yeast back into suspension. All in all, you didn't hurt anything. ...


5

Firstly, stop opening it, you looking at it isn't going to make anything good happen and could potentially lead to an infection. Try to get it somewhere warmer, assuming it's an ale yeast (you didn't say what type of yeast you were using) try to get it to 65-70F. Swirl it very gently a few times when it's in the warmer area to try to get the yeast active ...


4

Generally, most yeast created flavors will happen in the first 72 hours. After that (in general) you can start ramping up. You can also wait 4-5 days to be safe.


4

Nope. Beer will fight very hard to be beer. :) Your beer will not taste exactly like planned, but if it is bubbling then you are off to a good start. Kolsch uses a lager yeast and they are happy with the colder temps. As the beer warms up the yeast will also warm up and work faster, but keep the temps reasonable! A lower amount of water will mean that ...


4

Most bad esters are made during growth phase and early fermentation, it's only at the end of primary fermentation that you do your diacetyl rest, after the risks of undesirable esters has past.


3

It also doesn't hurt to start low, leave for a couple of days, increase, leave for a couple of days, etc. I usually don't increase it once I see krausen until the krausen starts to fall, but mosts ale yeasts say 65-75, but will ferment nice and clean down at ~60. This varies by yeast, but never hurts to start a bit low. Also, raising the temp a couple of ...


3

It should start fermenting after warming up. The temperature it dropped to is well above refrigerator temperature and yeast will survive being in the fridge. If it doesn't start you can pitch new yeast.


3

Moving the beer from the fridge to the closet is preferred. Yeast are sensitive to temperature changes, they handle going from cold to warm much better. Starting your fermentation at 23 C, while not terribly hot, will risk fusel alcohol production as the yeast are in a more hospitable environment and will consume the sugars more rapidly (by using these ...


3

Yeas, moving what's in the fridge to the closet is a good plan. Temp control is most crucial for the first 3-4 days. After that, I always increase the temp to ensure complete fermentation.


2

Heat it to 160F / 71.1C and hold it there for 6 seconds to pasteurize it, then add the malt sorghum. That will kill most microorganisms that might be in it, including the yeast.


2

The "malty" taste can come from burning the sugars in the beer. When you slowly pour in the LME, vigorously stir the boil to avoid pooling on the bottom of the kettle.


2

A little worried, perhaps, but regardless you should attempt to keep the yeast/beer itself in the yeast's ideal temperature range. If you have a temp controller, then look into getting some sort of "thermowell" to put the temp controller's sensor in the middle of the fermentor itself, but taping (and insulting) the probe against the side of the fermentor ...


2

I use one of these seedling heat mats as my heat source inside a freezer. They're built to have stuff sitting on top of them, they're water resistant, and they heat gently. Seems pretty safe to me. That said, you can make any of these options much safer by plugging your temperature controller into a GFCI outlet.


2

If fermentation has finished and you're certain of that, the beer will benefit from getting it as cold as possible rather than leaving it warm. Cold crashing, as it's called, will help drop the yeast and leave you with a clearer beer. In addition, it will provide you with a crisper, cleaner flavor.


2

I use a wine fridge that I took the shelves out of. I can fit a 5 gallon fermenter into it. It has a digital temp display on the front and I set that to the temp I want, it works well for the German lagers I make. Most wne fridges I looked at when I was after one had a flat bottom big enough to take a 5 gallon fermenter.


2

There isn't an ideal temp for any of this. There is a recommended range offered by the manufacturer to help guide the end user towards a higher degree of success that something will ferment. As for US-05 yeast, I've heard of people using it at weird temps outside the "recommended" range and having success. But success for them may be different than ...


2

Most Ales do well at 68°F primary, to limit phenols and undesirable esters made by yeast during growth phase. Secondary can go up to the higher end of recommended temp of a strain since there isn't much left for yeast to feed on and it's at this time the yeast consume those byproducts made in primary. So the higher temp encourages yeast metabolism. There ...


1

If you're using a malt extract then there isn't really much you can do to make an unfermentable wort. Warm it up, it will start fermenting. It helps to have one of those stick on thermometers on the side of your fermentation vessle.


1

A keggarator is a good choice, if it's not in use for serving. I have an old BevAir it fits two 6g Itialian carboys nicely. If you have a good back, deep freezers work nice too. As far as a flat bottom fridge, all of them I've seen converted usually have a DIY second bottom to make it level. Whatever you choose you will need to add a digital temp ...


1

Lower temp will give a cleaner flavour with fewer yeast generated esters. If you are up at 27C then you may get banana/clove flavours, which can be awesome if that is what you want. For a clean crisp mead that doesn't hide the character of the honey used I would suggest ~17C. It will take a few days longer to fully ferment all of the sugars at a lower ...


1

Natural yeasts like natural temps :p I would recommend ale fermentation temps, somewhere between 16 C and 20 C. You can go higher, but that will give you higher alcohols. Going colder will probably make the yeast go to sleep.


1

Depending on the type of temperature probe, you could use 2 of them in parallel, one in the middle of the wort and one taped to the side of the vessel to get a rough "average" of the reading of the two probes. Use the same probe type, wire, and wire length to help eliminate any difference in resistance that would affect the reading. Mathematically it won't ...


1

The temperature will vary, but as fermentation proceeds we will be generating CO2 which aids convection within the fermenter. As such you should not see a large difference, but if you see any then measure 1/2 way.


1

Measuring the wort temperature directly gives the most accurate information. To do this, you'll need to hook up a thermowell to your fermenter. There are a variety of styles for different types of fermenters. The second best option is to tape the temperature probe to the side of your fermenter and cover with an insulator like styrofoam or bubble wrap. The ...


1

I will state up front that I don't brew lagers, but I believe this information applies to both lagers and ales. Most ester (or ester precursor) production occurs during yeast reproduction. Since this happens early on in the fermentation process, you likely can't do much to stop it now. You also can't reverse it once it is done. According to this article, ...


1

I don't think that there will be a time where fermentation is still ongoing, but that there will be no off flavors generated. As I understand it, what's going on when a brewer raises the temperature for a time during fermentation, they are allowing for the generation of some off flavors. It will either fit the style of the beer, or if enough of the ...


1

As it is the stage which contains the majority of the activity (the first 3-4 days 90% of fermentable sugars are consumed), it is also the stage when the majority of waste products are produced by the yeast. The temperature control over this period plus the variety of yeast used will have the largest affect on the flavour profile of the beverage. Obviously ...


1

The open fermenter may ferment cooler due to the insulation of a lid, just as a pan with a lid on boils faster, but I can see the difference being huge. that is all things being equal. One difference that could potentially affect things regarding temperature would be the availability of dissolved oxygen, with more O2 available the yeast should be able to ...


1

The style guidelines for wheat beers mention ester notes as being common in German, and moderate in American wheat beers. I expect you might be ok. On the other hand, you might go with a saison or other farmhouse style that's more heat tolerant. You'll get more predictable results staying within the recommended temperature.


1

If not ruin it, it will make fairly bad beer. It is always better to wait til the wort reaches a good temp then to pitch the yeast at too high a temp. You can put the fermenter into a bathtub or other container and add cold water and ice to the water. Don't put ice directly into your wort. Ice is not sanitary and you risk contaminating your beer by doing ...



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