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7

Short answer - it's not that bad, per se. Long answer: The biggest 'problem' is consistency/isolation of variables. Particularly when all-grain brewing there are a lot of things to keep track of throughout the process. As you keep brewing, you'll want to aim to improve parts of your process, and you'll probably develop a few favorite recipes. In a ...


4

If you add near boiling water to fermenting wort, then yes, you can definitely kill some of the yeast, at least, any yeast that come in contact with that near boiling water. If there was enough yeast in the fermenter, distributed in other parts of the beer, then a lot of it may still be alive. If you see signs of fermentation (bubbling airlock, krausen) it ...


4

Yes, there is a potential risk of bottle bombs, as with any incomplete ferment. The residual fermentables can be fermented by the remaining yeast in the bottle along with the priming sugar and produce more CO2 than intended. Ideally you should cold crash only after you are sure primary is complete. Many brewers simply leave the beer in primary for at least 2 ...


3

You have to base the choice on what temp you want to ferment at, not necessarily an analytical choice in the optimum range. Different points in that range will create certain flavor profiles, all temps will make beer. The profile you want comes from experience. You need to remember that the fermentation itself generates heat. I am sure that your temp ...


3

I believe with all homebrewing that there is never a wasted batch, even the worst of the worst is an opportunity to learn something, so don't throw it out yet. You were lucky it was so late in the fermentation. The yeast won't die at the high temperature, and at this stage you may find you increased attenuation slightly. If a gravity reading indicates ...


3

As you reduce the temperature you need to compensate with more yeast, just as you do when brewing a lager. E.g. for a 1.050 ale fermented at 60°F a 2 liter starter would be the minimum. Alternatively, if pitching from a smaller starter, increase the temperature slowly after primary fermentation is almost complete - e.g. 3 days or when you hit 75% of ...


3

Positive temperature swings have been discussed - fusels and esters are the main problems. If the temperature fluctuating then you'll also have negative swings. Negative temperature swings can cause the yeast to drop out. This is particularly true with the Belgian strains, such as WLP530 and WLP570 - even with constant ambient temperature, removing the heat ...


3

It depends upon how hot the heat pad gets - you want to use a pad that doesn't go above 30°C/85°F. I use a waterproof pad that was originally intended as a pet warmer. It has an adjustable thermostat to set the highest temperature it will reach. I have mine set to 25°C/75°F. So, even though it is connected to a temperature controller, the ...


3

I don't think the near boiling water on its own will cause any harm. But unless you boiled it for a few minutes to remove oxygen before you added it, oxidation could be a problem.


3

It uses peltier devices - a thermoelectric cooling/heating device - when a current is applied they chill on one side and warm the other. They're quite common but relatively inefficient in terms of energy compared to a compressor that you'd find in a fridge. Their efficiency is based on how quickly you can dissipate the heat generated. Thermal design is a key ...


2

I use ale yeasts at fairly low temps all the time and I haven't experienced any so far that have negative characteristics at 60F. Some, like WY1007, 1728, or 1056 even work fine down into the 50s. Yes, a lower temp will produce fewer esters, but in general that's what I'm looking for. Whether fewer esters are a positive or negative effect depends on what ...


2

The yeast will be fine; I don't think you could have raised the temperature by more than 4 or 5 degrees F. That's not enough to harm the yeast, but it may result in increased ester production, giving the finished beer a fruity aroma. The beer will also be diluted a small amount, which is not a good thing. When raising the temperature of the fermenting ...


2

You're making a real lager, so try to keep the temps as low as possible - around 50F/10C would be about ideal. (The fermentation will raise temperature this by about 6F/3C.) But if you don't and let it warm up, it will still be a lager - it's because of the yeast - S-23 is a true lager strain (Saccaromyces pastorianus). Lager yeast tend to produce sulphur ...


2

It depends on the yeast you're using with your brew. If you're using an ale yeast that is best in the low-to-mid 70's, something like a Brew Belt is a relatively cheap and easy way to keep the temperature slightly higher than the ambient temperature of your closet. If you're brewing with a yeast that's best in the upper 60's, you may be fine with that ...


2

Yes, pitching yeast well below its optimum temperature and allowing it to rise will increase the lag time as opposed to pitching it at the optimum temperature. One thing to avoid is pitching room temperature yeast into cold wort, or vice-versa. This will shock the yeast and potentially cause issues with fermentation depending on the extent of the ...


2

1) Do I raise after 3 days or some other amount? (Rule of thumb here as I'm not going to take gravity readings) Assuming you aren't taking gravity readings, therefor you aren't examining the apparent attenuation, your best bet is to wait until after high-krausen. This really depends on the gravity of the beer, what yeast your using (ale vs. lager, fast ...


1

The main point of raising the temp is simple. As the sugars become limiting the yeast begin to enter a dormancy phase. As yeast slow down the temp of your fermentation begins to lower too. That lowering temp is also a signal to yeast to go dormant. This causes a cyclical effect of potential having the yeast drop out sooner than you want and you do not ...


1

You may misunderstand what that temp range means. It's where the yeast company has determined you'll get optimum performance. Being outside of that range doesn't mean the yeast won't work. The effects are likely to be minimal to none.


1

I would take a gravity reading - depending upon what you brewed fermentation may already be over. In which case cold crashing would have been the right thing to do. Or you can raise the temperature of the yeast again and rouse the beer to help get the yeast back into conditioning the beer for another week. With temperature control, I've found that ...


1

Yes, wrapping the carboy in a towel will act as insulation and retain some of the heat. Fermwrap's do require some amount of trial and error to find their sweet spots. Keep in mind that while the Fermwrap is powered on, it is actively generating heat. Immediately cut the power, and while it is no longer generating heat, the wrap itself is still warm, ...


1

In order: WLP004 and 1084 are actually the same yeast. Slightly different environments and /or methods of analysis probably account for the slightly different specs from each manufacturer. Yeast is a living thing after all. Your own brewing environment and methods will affect attenuation more than WhiteLabs vs WYeast will. If you're going for dry, read ...


1

You should try to raise the temperature of the beer back up to around 68F/20C, and give it a gentle shake to try to get the yeast resuspended. Note that you will see airlock activity - this doesn't necessarily mean fermentation has started, but that the higher temperature is causing the gas in the headspace to expand and exit the airlock. Leave it for ...


1

Saflager S-23 is a lager yeast. http://www.fermentis.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/SFG_S23.pdf 9-22°C as it ferments 12-15°C when you lager the beer. http://billybrew.com/swamp-cooler-homebrew try doing swamp cooler to get that temp down and under control. Lager not recommended for someone starting out. If you can't control fermantion temperature then ...


1

You'll want to ensure consistent temperatures. If your heating pad goes above seventy degrees Fahrenheit, you'll need a temperature controller to prevent it from going above. The ideal way to do this would be to have a heating pad that turns on the moment it is supplied power. I know a few you have to plug them in, turn them on, and then they'll run. ...


1

My understanding is that swings within a range are not a problem, as dax said. It may stress the yeast somewhat, but unless you are attempting to get perfect replication from brew to brew, or are trying to really nail down a flavor profile, it should be fine. I suspect that attempts to keep fermentation temperature at a rock steady level are as much an ...


1

Each yeast you use will have a recommended temperature range, however, that doesn't mean it's ideal to swing wildly, even within that range. You can typically get away with temps below the recommended range, but above the range will definitely produce off flavors, as will stressing the yeast out with wide temperature swings over the fermentation period. Even ...


1

There's a list of yeasts with temperature ranges here - http://beerandwinejournal.com/high-temp-yeast/ It's mainly Belgian abbey/trappist/saison yeast straings, with Saison being the high-temp winner.


1

The Ranco and Johnson controllers are both solid controllers, and they will work just fine. I know guys that have used both of them, and the only thing I would recommend is that you buy a controller that will work for you as you make changes to your system. To that end, here are a couple recommendations: Buy dual stage - You may not be concerned about ...


1

Partly it depends on the yeast. Westmalle (WLP 550, Wy 3787) is notorious for flocculating in the middle of a fermentation if it gets too cold, and thereafter being impossible to rouse. At that point, re-pitching is the only option. It can also very easily take off and get too hot--I've had 80F+ with it. Water bath is the best bet for that yeast. But it's ...


1

Started home brewing earlier this year and so far have only been concerned with heating rather than cooling as I didn't do any during this year's long hot summer. I put the fermentation vessel into a metal bath and filled that with enough water to cover a 300W Aquarium Fish Tank Submersible Heater. This has a temperature dial at the end which can be read ...



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