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5

40 degrees is quite a bit lower than the bottom range for your yeast. I'd expect that they've gone pretty much inactive. But don't worry! All you need to do to reactivate them is to warm your brew back up to the optimal temperature and provide some gentle agitation. Be careful not to splash! As fermentation has already stated, you don't want to add any ...


4

Generally, most yeast created flavors will happen in the first 72 hours. After that (in general) you can start ramping up. You can also wait 4-5 days to be safe.


4

Nope. Beer will fight very hard to be beer. :) Your beer will not taste exactly like planned, but if it is bubbling then you are off to a good start. Kolsch uses a lager yeast and they are happy with the colder temps. As the beer warms up the yeast will also warm up and work faster, but keep the temps reasonable! A lower amount of water will mean that ...


4

No you haven't. But, you should probably let it warm up to the recommended temperature, let it finish fermenting and then switch to fermenting ales for a while. It ought to still ferment fully and be drinkable, but it won't taste anything like what you might expect a lager to taste like. Lagers are really much more difficult to produce well than ales due to ...


3

It also doesn't hurt to start low, leave for a couple of days, increase, leave for a couple of days, etc. I usually don't increase it once I see krausen until the krausen starts to fall, but mosts ale yeasts say 65-75, but will ferment nice and clean down at ~60. This varies by yeast, but never hurts to start a bit low. Also, raising the temp a couple of ...


2

Those temps are close enough together that it really doesn't make much difference which you choose. If I had to choose, though, I'd go with the recipe. The temps recommended by yeast manufacturers are very approximate and often too high.


2

Heat it to 160F / 71.1C and hold it there for 6 seconds to pasteurize it, then add the malt sorghum. That will kill most microorganisms that might be in it, including the yeast.


2

The "malty" taste can come from burning the sugars in the beer. When you slowly pour in the LME, vigorously stir the boil to avoid pooling on the bottom of the kettle.


2

A little worried, perhaps, but regardless you should attempt to keep the yeast/beer itself in the yeast's ideal temperature range. If you have a temp controller, then look into getting some sort of "thermowell" to put the temp controller's sensor in the middle of the fermentor itself, but taping (and insulting) the probe against the side of the fermentor ...


2

If fermentation has finished and you're certain of that, the beer will benefit from getting it as cold as possible rather than leaving it warm. Cold crashing, as it's called, will help drop the yeast and leave you with a clearer beer. In addition, it will provide you with a crisper, cleaner flavor.


1

Depending on the type of temperature probe, you could use 2 of them in parallel, one in the middle of the wort and one taped to the side of the vessel to get a rough "average" of the reading of the two probes. Use the same probe type, wire, and wire length to help eliminate any difference in resistance that would affect the reading. Mathematically it won't ...


1

The temperature will vary, but as fermentation proceeds we will be generating CO2 which aids convection within the fermenter. As such you should not see a large difference, but if you see any then measure 1/2 way.


1

I will state up front that I don't brew lagers, but I believe this information applies to both lagers and ales. Most ester (or ester precursor) production occurs during yeast reproduction. Since this happens early on in the fermentation process, you likely can't do much to stop it now. You also can't reverse it once it is done. According to this article, ...


1

I don't think that there will be a time where fermentation is still ongoing, but that there will be no off flavors generated. As I understand it, what's going on when a brewer raises the temperature for a time during fermentation, they are allowing for the generation of some off flavors. It will either fit the style of the beer, or if enough of the ...


1

As it is the stage which contains the majority of the activity (the first 3-4 days 90% of fermentable sugars are consumed), it is also the stage when the majority of waste products are produced by the yeast. The temperature control over this period plus the variety of yeast used will have the largest affect on the flavour profile of the beverage. Obviously ...


1

The open fermenter may ferment cooler due to the insulation of a lid, just as a pan with a lid on boils faster, but I can see the difference being huge. that is all things being equal. One difference that could potentially affect things regarding temperature would be the availability of dissolved oxygen, with more O2 available the yeast should be able to ...


1

The style guidelines for wheat beers mention ester notes as being common in German, and moderate in American wheat beers. I expect you might be ok. On the other hand, you might go with a saison or other farmhouse style that's more heat tolerant. You'll get more predictable results staying within the recommended temperature.


1

If not ruin it, it will make fairly bad beer. It is always better to wait til the wort reaches a good temp then to pitch the yeast at too high a temp. You can put the fermenter into a bathtub or other container and add cold water and ice to the water. Don't put ice directly into your wort. Ice is not sanitary and you risk contaminating your beer by doing ...


1

Yes, if that is the target temperature for fermentation is 21-27 C it is most certainly ale yeast. I would just let it ferment an extra week or so at somewhere around 20 C. If you are interesting in true lagers in the future, your shed sounds like a nice place for lagering if you can trust the weather. I think you will find you love the beer no matter ...


1

I'd try to keep the beer warm for at least two or three weeks to ensure good primary fermentation. If you can do that, I say just go for it. The wild/bacteria portions of the culture will express themselves eventually. Many are slow moving to begin with, and the initial lower temps will not stop them, just slow them down a bit. The beer won't taste right for ...


1

14C is 57F or so. That awfully cool for an ale yeast. Even 16C is only 60F. That's still below their recommended range. While it may be recommended to ferment at lower temperatures, 4C/8F lower than WL's recommended minimum will definitely slow, and possibly halt, fermentation. You said that initial fermentation was "extremely vigorous" so this drop in ...


1

I just kicked a keg of Helles fermented with WLP940, great yeast! I pitched at 46°F and let it ramp up to 48°F for primary. I used this quick lager method and the beer was fantastic just 3 weeks later.


1

I also use a water bath for controlling fermentation temps. I found a bluetooth weatherhawk temperature sensor that reports to a mobile app and it is waterproof. So I built an stc 1000 temp controller to selectively switch between an aquarium heater & small recirc pump on the hot side and a peltier liquid chiller on the cold side.



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