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7

Short answer - it's not that bad, per se. Long answer: The biggest 'problem' is consistency/isolation of variables. Particularly when all-grain brewing there are a lot of things to keep track of throughout the process. As you keep brewing, you'll want to aim to improve parts of your process, and you'll probably develop a few favorite recipes. In a ...


6

You may want to check out brewpi - it's a fermentation monitor, but isn't limited to just fermentation. The temperature devices used are DS18B20 temperature probes. You can get these pre-made in waterproof housing from sellers on ebay - the project also has a shop that sells them. The manufacturers claim they are accurate to +/- 0.5 C, although my tests ...


5

Don't worry have a homebrew. It is very unlikely that a temperature change from 80-72 would shock the yeast. People like to ferment at lower temperatures because it produces less byproducts that add off flavors to beer. Additionally, 6 hours for the temperature change is definitely not a quick temperature change in the time scale of yeast. Agreed only a ...


5

Cold water alone will not drop your temperatures eight degrees. You will need ice packs. A more readily available option is to go out and buy a case of water bottles from the store, freeze a couple of bottles, and just rotate them out every 6-8 hours by placing them in the water of the swamp cooler. Take an old cotton t-shirt and pull it over the top of ...


4

If you add near boiling water to fermenting wort, then yes, you can definitely kill some of the yeast, at least, any yeast that come in contact with that near boiling water. If there was enough yeast in the fermenter, distributed in other parts of the beer, then a lot of it may still be alive. If you see signs of fermentation (bubbling airlock, krausen) it ...


4

Yes, there is a potential risk of bottle bombs, as with any incomplete ferment. The residual fermentables can be fermented by the remaining yeast in the bottle along with the priming sugar and produce more CO2 than intended. Ideally you should cold crash only after you are sure primary is complete. Many brewers simply leave the beer in primary for at least 2 ...


3

Positive temperature swings have been discussed - fusels and esters are the main problems. If the temperature fluctuating then you'll also have negative swings. Negative temperature swings can cause the yeast to drop out. This is particularly true with the Belgian strains, such as WLP530 and WLP570 - even with constant ambient temperature, removing the heat ...


3

As you reduce the temperature you need to compensate with more yeast, just as you do when brewing a lager. E.g. for a 1.050 ale fermented at 60°F a 2 liter starter would be the minimum. Alternatively, if pitching from a smaller starter, increase the temperature slowly after primary fermentation is almost complete - e.g. 3 days or when you hit 75% of ...


3

It depends upon how hot the heat pad gets - you want to use a pad that doesn't go above 30°C/85°F. I use a waterproof pad that was originally intended as a pet warmer. It has an adjustable thermostat to set the highest temperature it will reach. I have mine set to 25°C/75°F. So, even though it is connected to a temperature controller, the ...


3

You have to base the choice on what temp you want to ferment at, not necessarily an analytical choice in the optimum range. Different points in that range will create certain flavor profiles, all temps will make beer. The profile you want comes from experience. You need to remember that the fermentation itself generates heat. I am sure that your temp ...


3

I believe with all homebrewing that there is never a wasted batch, even the worst of the worst is an opportunity to learn something, so don't throw it out yet. You were lucky it was so late in the fermentation. The yeast won't die at the high temperature, and at this stage you may find you increased attenuation slightly. If a gravity reading indicates ...


3

It uses peltier devices - a thermoelectric cooling/heating device - when a current is applied they chill on one side and warm the other. They're quite common but relatively inefficient in terms of energy compared to a compressor that you'd find in a fridge. Their efficiency is based on how quickly you can dissipate the heat generated. Thermal design is a key ...


2

The yeast will not necessarily drop out at 60F. I've used 1214 at that temp many times and I find it preferable to fermenting it at higher temps. In fact, I prefer fermenting pretty much any ale (and many lager) yeasts at or below the lower end of the temp range. You get cleaner beer with fewer esters and phenolics. I often ferment WY1007 and 1728 in the ...


2

You're measuring the temperature of the swamp cooler water and not the beer, and the beer will take a long time to reach the cooler water temperature, which will also rise in temp during the same period. This is because heat transfer between the beer and the cooling water is slow, since the surface area is small compared to the volume, plus both liquids are ...


2

While not the most elegant, you can go through the lid in a larger fermentor without a thermowell. I put this together without wanting to incur the cost of a thermowell - so I used some electrical tape, an extra hole opposite the airlock and a rubber grommet. I patiently and accurately wrapped the tape around the sensor wire, building it out so it fit nice ...


2

According to WineMaker Magazine, there's two different strains from Vintner's Harvest. Depending on which one you have, the following information should be everything you would need to ensure a proper fermentation: Company Yeast Name Dry/Liquid Strain # Suggested Wine Styles ...


2

I recently did a saison using only Brettanomyces Claussenii, and it turned out very interesting. Despite many misconceptions, brett will not sour beer. I didn't even see much in the way of a pellicle as many claim to get when they ferment with Brett. White labs doesn't condense down the yeast when they package it, so it isn't much to look at in comparison ...


2

I use ale yeasts at fairly low temps all the time and I haven't experienced any so far that have negative characteristics at 60F. Some, like WY1007, 1728, or 1056 even work fine down into the 50s. Yes, a lower temp will produce fewer esters, but in general that's what I'm looking for. Whether fewer esters are a positive or negative effect depends on what ...


2

I'm actually in the exact same boat. Well.. Similar. Wasn't going to bother with the smartphone, but will have some form of communication. Here's what I have in mind I just ordered a USB Thermometer off Amazon that people have managed to get working in linux (specifically Ubuntu, but it sounds like it is agnostic to distros). From here I could whip up ...


2

It depends on the yeast you're using with your brew. If you're using an ale yeast that is best in the low-to-mid 70's, something like a Brew Belt is a relatively cheap and easy way to keep the temperature slightly higher than the ambient temperature of your closet. If you're brewing with a yeast that's best in the upper 60's, you may be fine with that ...


2

The yeast will be fine; I don't think you could have raised the temperature by more than 4 or 5 degrees F. That's not enough to harm the yeast, but it may result in increased ester production, giving the finished beer a fruity aroma. The beer will also be diluted a small amount, which is not a good thing. When raising the temperature of the fermenting ...


2

You're making a real lager, so try to keep the temps as low as possible - around 50F/10C would be about ideal. (The fermentation will raise temperature this by about 6F/3C.) But if you don't and let it warm up, it will still be a lager - it's because of the yeast - S-23 is a true lager strain (Saccaromyces pastorianus). Lager yeast tend to produce sulphur ...


2

Yes, pitching yeast well below its optimum temperature and allowing it to rise will increase the lag time as opposed to pitching it at the optimum temperature. One thing to avoid is pitching room temperature yeast into cold wort, or vice-versa. This will shock the yeast and potentially cause issues with fermentation depending on the extent of the ...


2

1) Do I raise after 3 days or some other amount? (Rule of thumb here as I'm not going to take gravity readings) Assuming you aren't taking gravity readings, therefor you aren't examining the apparent attenuation, your best bet is to wait until after high-krausen. This really depends on the gravity of the beer, what yeast your using (ale vs. lager, fast ...


1

My understanding is that swings within a range are not a problem, as dax said. It may stress the yeast somewhat, but unless you are attempting to get perfect replication from brew to brew, or are trying to really nail down a flavor profile, it should be fine. I suspect that attempts to keep fermentation temperature at a rock steady level are as much an ...


1

Each yeast you use will have a recommended temperature range, however, that doesn't mean it's ideal to swing wildly, even within that range. You can typically get away with temps below the recommended range, but above the range will definitely produce off flavors, as will stressing the yeast out with wide temperature swings over the fermentation period. Even ...


1

Im from Venezuela (80 ºF) so I´m familiar to those off flavor you mention. In my (really short humble) experience, when brewing regular beers, using S-03 and fermenting in a cool room (no a refrigerated one, just a dark corner) does the trick. Although when trying higher-gravity beers (OG 1.060) with S-03 sometimes we get some "Hot alcohol" flavors, like ...


1

Sasion yeast can handle the high temperatures. But it's a style unto itself. I wouldn't recommend trying to brew an IPA or a Stout with Sasion yeast. I know many home brewers have success using a swamp cooler to control temperature.


1

You can find information like fermentation temp and attentuation on different kinds of wine yeasts from the white labs homepage: These are also the yeasts strains easily available for the homebrewer. http://www.whitelabs.com/beer/homebrew/listings?style=3


1

I think that it depends a lot on the yeast you're using, the beer you're using it in and where that beer is in its life-cycle (:D). If you made a particularly large starter of especially hearty yeast and it's at day 2.5 peak-Krausen, it will take a lot more abuse than a beer on it's third week in primary made with 5th generation yeast you underpitched. ...



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