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11

The wet t-shirt and swamp cooler method is probably insufficient for temperatures in the mid 90's. Controlling fermentation temperature is one of the best things you can do to make good beer! Like Florida, the temperatures in East Texas get stupid-hot eight months out of the year. Last year I built myself a duck-in cooler powered by a small window air ...


10

Fermentation temperature does play a pretty big role in how the beer is going to taste. If the temperature is too high you can get excessive amounts of ester production and also can produce higher alcohols and phenolics that are undesired. If the temperature is too low, ale yeast can be sluggish or go dormant too soon causing under attenuation. It can also ...


10

In order to be able to calculate fermentation temperature, an exothermic process, we need to know how much heat (H) is "evolved" as yeasts convert sugars to alcohol. Digging around in the literature I found this article (1). Although its focus is bioethanol production, it does give some figures in terms of joules per mole which we can use to do the ...


8

This is what I am doing... Ferment at 50F. When the beer is 60% attenuated allow the temperature to rise to 59F. Leave at this temp for 48 hours for a diacetyl rest. Rack to a secondary Slowly bring the temperature of the beer down. 4F per day Once at lagering temperature (mine is 35F), leave it alone for 20 days. After 20 days, taste it, if it doesn't ...


8

It's best to keep it as constant as possible until the primary fermentation is complete. It can be critical when you are reaching the end of fermentation to adjust the temperature slightly as there is not as much heat being produced from yeast reactions. If the temperture drops a couple of degrees certain strains of yeast can flocculate too soon leaving ...


7

If all you're doing with the secondary is conditioning the beer, i.e. letting the flavors develop and whatnot, it can be cooler. If you're trying to let the yeast continue to ferment out the last few gravity points, it's best to leave it around the same temperature. If the yeast are fermenting and you drop the temperature, they could fall out of suspension ...


7

Temp swings can cause problems, but temps as high as what you've got can cause even worse problems. Keep in mind that fermentation is an exothermic process. Therefore, you should chill your wort to below the temp you want to ferment at and then let it rise to the proper range. Don't sacrifice beer quality and flavor for a short lag time or fast ...


7

Relax. It sounds like fermentation is proceeding normally. The 3-inch scum ring is the krausen and is a sign of a healthy fermentation - a foam head wouldn't last 3 days. Your airlock is probably not air-tight so you don't see any activity. It's quite common - I've had this on a couple of brews. Take a hydrometer reading in a couple of days, and you should ...


7

In terms of controlling esters/fusels/flavors, my understanding is that temperature control is most important in the first 48-72 hours of fermentation. But in terms of yeast happiness, temp control can be more important for a longer stretch. If the temperature of the beer will rise after you turn off temp control, then you don't have a big problem. But if ...


7

I would get hold of another sachet of yeast as a backup. If you have a local homebrew store, almost any type of yeast will work for this kit, but I'd recommend Safale US-05 if you can get that, since that will give you a cleaner profile. If they have liquid yeasts, then Wyeast 1056 or White Labs WLP001 will produce equivalent results. Once you've got hold of ...


7

Short answer - it's not that bad, per se. Long answer: The biggest 'problem' is consistency/isolation of variables. Particularly when all-grain brewing there are a lot of things to keep track of throughout the process. As you keep brewing, you'll want to aim to improve parts of your process, and you'll probably develop a few favorite recipes. In a ...


6

It was definitely a good idea to move it. Leave it where it is. Personally, I would have moved it to someplace even cooler. I prefer to ferment generally ion the 62-65F range. The best thing to do is chill your wort to just below the temp you want to ferment. The heat of fermentation will bring it up into range. The temp you started at might have ...


6

One of the cheapest solutions I have heard of is to immerse the carboy in a Rubbermaid water cooler filled with water. The water will act as a great insulator. To heat or cool to keep the temperature within the range you are looking for you can use a fish tank heater and ice packs. This method obviously means you will be needing to check on your beer quite ...


6

Pitching the slurry is key to your process here. The higher temp will put some less desirable flavors into the starter wort. So crash chilling and pitching the slurry is the best bet. I think I remember hearing a podcast with Chris White from White Labs say they propagate most yeast (even lager yeasts) at 80F. Most yeast grows best at temps above normal ...


6

Yes, yeast have an optimal temperature range. Too cold They become dormant and won't ferment all of the sugars impacting the flavor, mouth feel and alcohol content Too hot They flip out and produce fusel alcohols that can taste like cleaners or solvents. You can shake some of these flavors off during secondary but if there's too many they'll stick ...


6

I would suggest that for each recipe you put together, to do some googling to find out what temp ranges for a given yeast are going to work best for the flavor you are trying to get. Starting off in the middle of the yeast manufacturer's range is good, I know of several strains where the recommended range doesn't match what real home-brewers are reporting. ...


6

You may want to check out brewpi - it's a fermentation monitor, but isn't limited to just fermentation. The temperature devices used are DS18B20 temperature probes. You can get these pre-made in waterproof housing from sellers on ebay - the project also has a shop that sells them. The manufacturers claim they are accurate to +/- 0.5 C, although my tests ...


5

For most people brewing a Saison is a great summer compatible beer to brew. The saison yeast works best at 80F. And the flavor of saison is often citrusy and light. You can brew a saison to a variety of OGs for different levels of enjoyment. You can make a session style saison or a bigger version to pair well with food. Check out this BJCP link to Saison. ...


5

A lot of good info here, so I'll just throw in my $0.02 Your techniques when starting out will usually not be optimal. Part of this is because the instructions supplied by kits and shop owners are usually oversimplified to make the process less intimidating. That being said, you usually still wind up making beer, it may just not be the best beer :) The ...


5

You probably just haven't waited long enough yet. Make sure the lid is on tight and wait another 24 hours. Dry yeast and the first time experience tends to take a while for things to start perking. Just be patient. Hot water can be too hot, but as long as it is under 100F you should be OK. Some of the yeast probably didn't survive the shock, but you ...


5

My guess is that it's functioning as it should - most home thermometers that aren't calibrated are usually off by anywhere from 2-5 degrees F or more. Assuming your Johnson controller is the most accurate of the 3, then getting 45F and 52F can be considered within tolerance if the actual temperature is 50F. One other thing that may be a surprise is that ...


5

It depends somewhat on what flavors you are looking for and how long you want to wait, post-fermentation, to drink it. Warmer fermentation is going to produce more fruity esters from the yeast, but they also produce more complex (hot) alcohols. Primary fermentation will finish relatively quickly, but the mead is going to have to sit in secondary for ...


5

I had something similar with an Oatmeal Stout I used S-04 with. I fermented it a bit warm (room and pitch temp), but the yeast went totally nuts during the first three days. Overall, it didn't seem to have much bad effect. There was a minor note of fruity/floral-ness that was introduced, which wasn't present in subsequent iterations of the beer, but it was ...


5

NEVER use bubbling as a measure of anything important. You MUST take actual gravity readings to know where your fermentation is. As a general rule, you should do a diacytl rest when you are about 70-80% done with fermentation. So for a "normal" strength lager (1.050-1.060 OG) I'll start the diacytl rest when the beer hits about the 1.020-1.022 range ...


5

Well first of all, you can't really turn around a 1.090 Lager in two months time (7/19 - 9/29). Its going to need 3 months of lagering minimum AFTER fermentation is totally done. So if you really want beer that's "more than good" for your wedding, then you need to brew a backup Ale right now that has a short maturation period. (I suggest a wheat beer, like a ...


5

During the start of the fermentation the Yeast reproduces quickly using the oxygen present in the beer and produces diacetyl which imparts a buttery flavor. Which is why it is usually recommended to start the fermentation at a lower temperature to slow down the diacetyl production (and the reproduction rate, I suppose). The beer fermentation is then ...


5

Don't worry have a homebrew. It is very unlikely that a temperature change from 80-72 would shock the yeast. People like to ferment at lower temperatures because it produces less byproducts that add off flavors to beer. Additionally, 6 hours for the temperature change is definitely not a quick temperature change in the time scale of yeast. Agreed only a ...


5

Cold water alone will not drop your temperatures eight degrees. You will need ice packs. A more readily available option is to go out and buy a case of water bottles from the store, freeze a couple of bottles, and just rotate them out every 6-8 hours by placing them in the water of the swamp cooler. Take an old cotton t-shirt and pull it over the top of ...


4

I have used a brew belt off and on for several years. There is no real way to control it. I suppose if you had a thermowell and a temp controller you could dial it in. However, it only really heats to so much over ambient temp. It doesn't have a built in theermostat to stop at say 70F. I used to get a good 70F ferment with it when the ambient temp was ...


4

Check the yeast maker's web site for preferred temperatures. Yeast can work in a range, many down to 60°F. Pick a yeast that can handle the temps, hybrids like California ale. If fermentation is truly stopped, not just slow, you need to wake the yeast up again. When temperatures return to the preferred range shake the carboy up to rouse the yeast and ...



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