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27

All grain is cheaper (in the not-so-long run), you get way more flexibility on your grain bill and mash, I'd argue it's more fun, and it's really easy to do.


11

In short: 4.2 lbs DME DME = 0.84 * LME LME = 1.19 * DME The whyfor It depends on the manufacturer. Extracts and malts and adjuncts all have a "points per pound per gallon" rating that you can look up from the supplier. In general, dry malt extract gives you 44 pppg and liquid 37 pppg. 5 pounds of LME gives you 185 points. To get the equivalent points ...


10

After ten years of kits and extracts, I finally went all-grain 6 weeks ago. It is so much fun! If you enjoy what you're doing now, I'd say give it a try because there is so much more to enjoy. I've brewed on 5 of the last 6 Saturdays, and had a great time each time. I only spent about $150 on extra equipment, and that includes a grain mill. I can buy my ...


10

Reuse your yeast. If you're making multiple batches of the same beer, or even two different beers that require a similar yeast strain, you can pitch your (chilled) wort directly onto the yeast cake from the previous batch. If you're not planning to use the yeast again right away, you can wash the yeast and store it for later. This topic on HomebrewTalk ...


10

If you boil the entire volume of your extract batches, go ahead and measure it. But most extract brewers do a partial boil and add top up water afterward. In that case, it's REALLY REALLY REALLY hard to get the extract and water mixed thoroughly enough to get an accurate reading. The extract is heavier due to the sugar in it and sinks to the bottom of the ...


10

I have judged in comps where an extract beer has taken best of show. It's a challenge, but there are certain styles that can be made well with extract and if you choose one of those and exercise great technique, you can definitely make an award winning beer with extract.


9

Most of what makes a great beer great is fermentation, not necessarily where the wort came from. Todays extracts are very high quality. And many extracts are becoming available to make wort you could only get as an all grainer. For example 100% Munich or Pilsner or English extracts. Focus on a great fermentation and you will make great beer. Then if you ...


8

Making a (good) hard root beer sounds tricky. At least, the traditional method of brewing root beer doesn't seem like it would scale well to the weeks-of-fermentation beer brewing model. I imagine in the end, while you would have higher alcohol content, too much of the sugar will have been fermented, so you'd end up with a few gallons of not very sweet ...


8

There are no concerns over going to a smaller batch size. 3 gallon carboys and buckets are easily found. Check out USplastics.com they have all sorts of funky food grade buckets and things. The other great thing about doing say 2.5 gallon batch is that you can start passing up on starters. Just pitch an entire tube of White labs and you are definitely ...


7

Multiply your base malt weight by .75 do get the same (ish) amount in liquid extract. For example - 10lbs. Pilsner malt = 7.5lbs Pilsner Liquid Malt Extract For a Dry Malt Extract multiply by .6. For example - 10lbs malt = 6lbs. Dry Malt Extract Steep specialty grains as usual.


7

Personally I think our all-grain batches taste better. This might be due to the better grains we are using, or the fact that we are better brewers now.


7

I went through exactly this about 9 months ago. I couldn't find anything online about it, so I used a basic cider as the inspiration. Here are the exact notes I took while brewing it. Some sections were direct copies from the cider recipe, I added the rest. 1lb Munton’s Dry Malt 2Fl Oz Root Beer Concentrate ¾ cup priming sugar 5lbs granulated sugar ...


7

It's reasonable to assume that something happens in the process of evaporating down to syrup or DME, and that that something differs from a wort made fresh by mashing. From what I've read, it's a combination of sweetness from under-attenuation, and off flavors from the production/storage of syrup. I've not really identified a particular flavor that I ...


7

Most recipes are formulated for full wort, full gravity boils. Reserving extract would increase your hop utilization and the beer would be slightly, but probably not noticeably, lighter. Make your own decision about the benefits.


7

I don't think its common practice, but there are several extract breweries out there. The most important factor influencing beer quality at the homebrew and the professional level is fermentation control. That includes temperatures, ptiching rate and yeast health and management. These things would be the same for an extract brewery or an all grain ...


7

The shelf life of a recipe kit varies based on what type of ingredients come in the kit. Yeast- Liquid yeast should be used within 3 months of the production date for best results but can be viable for up to 6 months but a yeast starter is recommended for yeast that old. Dry yeast can be viable for up to 1 year if stored at room temp and even longer if ...


7

Yes, it is OK squeeze. In fact, you want as much extract as possible from the specialty malts. It is a common myth that squeezing the grain bag is a bad idea due to "tannins being extracted" or similar. There is no reason for this to be true --- tannins are extracted from the grain (husk) only if the temperature during steeping/mashing is too high. And then ...


6

Hop utilization - the amount of acid bitterness extracted from hops - is greatly affected by the gravity of the boil, or the concentration of sugars in the boiling wort. The more concentrated the sugars, the less the hops will be utilized. If you are trying to attain a certain level of HBUs in your recipe, you can do one of two things - go with a more ...


6

If we steal the numbers from this question, we can assume that liquid malt extract has a value of about 37 points per pound per gallon, and dry has about 44. This is not exact. total gravity points needed = Desired total gravity - current total gravity total gravity points needed = 47 * 5 (desired reading * desired volume) - 37 * 5 (current reading * ...


6

Typically, the long boil is intended to increase melanoidin formation ("kettle carmelization") and decrease DMS in wort with a lot of pilsener malt. The former appears to be the case, here: "While you could go with a shorter boil, the 90 minute boil enhances the blood-red color. It also adds a touch more melanoidin and caramel notes." It's ...


6

The sludge is mostly coagulated proteins, hop residue. A little bit is actually good for your wort, as it provides nutrients for the yeast. Too much might give the beer some slight off flavours. If you were to let the sludge into the fermenter, it wouldn't be the end of the world, but you'll make better beer if your exclude most of it. So, to answer your ...


5

I once had a delicious "American Cervesa" that was kegged into an uncleaned root beer keg. It was really freaking delicious. Definitely had a noticeable root beer flavor.


5

Dry Malt Extract Ups Stores well Easy to repackage in a ZiplocTM bag Gives you more points per pound per gallon than liquid (IE: more gravity per weight) Because it's easier to repackage it keeps longer Downs Makes a dusty mess Becomes a sticky mess if it gets wet (still usable if you can get it out of the package) Can cause your beer to be darker ...


5

No I just dump. [Edit, thanks to TinCoyote] When asking these sort of questions I always think about the proportions (or dilution rate). Pitching a few tens of ml into 19,000 ml won't even register on your tongue.


5

Boiling longer than 60 min. is generally not necessary for extract beers. Hot break occurred when the extract was produced, so break in the kettle will be little to none. Buit a 60 min. boil makes sure you get the maximum utilization from your bittering hops.


5

Northern Brewer has 3 gallon carboys in both glass and plastic. And you can get 3 gallon kegs, as well. If you can halve all of the ingredients in a kit, I can't think of any problems with brewing that way. My concern would be trying to split a jug of LME into halves. You'd probably need a scale to do it accurately.


5

This is a perfectly fine technique if you don't want to do a double mash session to get it all grain. The only limitation with trying to go "imperial" using a large portion of extract (or doing it all extract if you aren't set up for all-grain brewing) is the fermentability of the extract. Extract, by nature of how it is made, tends to have a limit to ...


5

In the Brew Strong episode about DMS they said that pilsner extract did not need a longer boil, since the DMS would be off gassed during the process of concentrating the extract.


5

Many LMEs provide about 1.036 PPG. If this is a five gallon batch, you're talking about a drop of 1.4 points (36*.2/5). Not much to make a big difference in taste IMO. If you want to replace that lost sugar using molasses or syrup, find the points of the sugar and work backwards. Brown Sugar is 46 ppg so you would need .156 pounds to make up the difference ...


5

Boiling serves a few purposes in beer. Mainly it is done for the dual purpose of extracting bitterness from hops while also killing any wild yeast or bacteria that were on the brewing ingredients. In the case of hopped malt extract, the bitterness has already been extracted for you, and the extract itself is totally sterile as its already been boiled down ...



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