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10

If you boil the entire volume of your extract batches, go ahead and measure it. But most extract brewers do a partial boil and add top up water afterward. In that case, it's REALLY REALLY REALLY hard to get the extract and water mixed thoroughly enough to get an accurate reading. The extract is heavier due to the sugar in it and sinks to the bottom of the ...


6

Typically, the long boil is intended to increase melanoidin formation ("kettle carmelization") and decrease DMS in wort with a lot of pilsener malt. The former appears to be the case, here: "While you could go with a shorter boil, the 90 minute boil enhances the blood-red color. It also adds a touch more melanoidin and caramel notes." It's ...


5

I've done all of the following in extract + grains brewing with 1 - 4 lbs of grain and I can honestly say I've never noticed a difference in the final product: Remove grain bag from brew kettle, place in bowl, pour hot water over it, press it with spoon, add liquid back to kettle. Remove grain bag from kettle, hold above kettle while spraying with hose. ...


4

You may get some oxidation of the "specialty" wort letting it sit like that. You aren't really saving any time though. Start your steep in cold water while you heat it up. By the time its at 160F you are generally good to pull the grains out and keep on heating to boiling. I know most instructions when I started extract and grain brewing says to steep in ...


3

I disagree with Denny's assessment. Compare the theoretical results of not crushing them to grinding them into a powder. The the first case you'll get little flavor/color; in the second you get maximum flavor/color. So the crush does indeed have an important impact. The key is to do it the same way every time for consistency brew to brew. That way an ...


3

I would be cautious. I'm not a chemist, but here is what I could find on the subject: The biggest risk appears to come from plasticizers used to make your PVC probe flexible. PVC is very brittle; the plasticizers are used combat that. A study published in the Journal of Applied Polymer Science shows high rates of leaching of plasticizers in PVC at high ...


3

If the reason for doing so is enzymatic conversion, then no. Malt extract, wheat or otherwise, has already been mashed, and thus already had it's starches converted to sugars, and will ferment just fine. The reason for doing this in an all-grain batch is because wheat doesn't have enough enzymes in it to self-convert its starches into sugars during the ...


3

I always did at least a 1hr boil when doing an extract brew (with various hop additions). It can take ~20min. for the hot break to occur, depending on the amount of protein in your extract. It is recommended that you wait until the hot break occurs before doing your first hop addition and timing an hour. In your case you should be safe adding your hops ...


2

When I did partial-mash batches, I usually placed the bag of grain in a mesh strainer above my brew pot and poured my sparge water over the bag. It helps to find a strainer wide enough so that it's handles rest on the rim of your pot, otherwise you'll need a brave friend to hold it while you pour your sparge water.


2

I'd say yes, taste wise it will be spot on compared to the original recipe. I'd also venture a guess that the recipe was based on an OLDER recipe which used those specific grains, but was converted to extract for the convenience of extract brewers. Seriously, who measures out liquid extract in units less than a pound? My only question is how you got the ...


2

I've not brewed with it, but from the Weyermann specs, it's 13L (11.8-13.7L) mild, restrained notes of caramel honey-colored hue use up to 30% in Belgian Blonde, Amber, Tripel, Dubbel Given that it's 500g and it's playing against Vienna, the color is probably less significant than the flavor. To get the restrained caramel, you could probably get away ...


2

There's no upper limit in terms of how much speciality malt you can actually use and still extract sugar - the limit is more to do with taste. To my mind, in an extract brew, 20% is the maximum amount of caramel/crystal malt that I would use in a recipe, simply because of the amount of residual sweetness left, which is on top of the sweetness left by the ...


2

With the 'tea' being added to your 60 minute boil, and as long as you follow good sanitation procedures, I don't see any major problems that you would run into. But, you can much more easily just steep your grains in your brew pot while bringing your water up to a boil. This won't add time to your brew day, and will save you time having to deal with ...


2

as a side note, digital meat thermometers with a thin flat cord attaching a probe to a base station work REALLY WELL! I splurged and bought a high quality one ($30) and it's amazing. You insert the metal probe into the mash and the thin cord allows you to close the lid and monitor temp on the base station. You can even set it to alarm at certain ...


2

With two pounds of base malt, and one pound of maize, you can certainly get away with 30 minutes and expect full conversion. Thats been the case in my experience, especially at 154F temps. The warmer the mash the faster things progress. And most flaked maize is pre-gelatinized, BTW.


2

You should boil the extract to kill off any nasties. (In reality it's probably not that big of a deal, since it should theoretically already be sanitary coming from the manufacturer, especially if it's canned liquid extract) The point of adding extract late is to prevent your wort from darkening. Boiling the extract for the full 60 minutes will cause the ...


1

That depends on how you define "body." This BYO article offers a pretty solid definition on body: "Body is the sensation of palate fullness, the viscosity and feel of beer in the mouth. It is a characteristic of beer that reflects its ending density and refers to the mouth-filling and thickness properties that a given sample contains." The BYO article ...


1

To answer your first question: "In the base malt or steeped". Saison Dupont uses a mashing method, they do not used steeped grains because all the specialty grains can be added to the mash to achieve the desired flavor as well as fermentable sugars. I will go out on a limb and say that 99.9% of commercial beers do not use the steeping grain method used in ...


1

You're right - maize doesn't contain any enzymes and needs to be mashed alongside a high Lintner grain, like the 6-row you've chosen. If the maize is pre-gelatinized, then you can just hit your target mash temp for the fermentability profile you want. For ungelatinized maize, you'll need to hold it at 170F for 15 mins to make the starch soluble and then ...


1

The issue will be if oat malt has enough diastatic power to convert itself. If so, you can do a minimash (really just a steep with controlled water amount, temp, and time). If not, you'll need to add some pale malt and do the same process. But oat malt will not give you the same flavor results as flaked oats. For the 4 oz. that's called for in the ...


1

According to How to Brew, the 1 hour boil is really just for the purpose of the hop editions, and you wouldn't need to boil at all if you're using pasteurized hopped extract, because the boiling is just for pasteurization in that case. My guess is that the 90 minute boil is for the hops, just as Dogfish Head makes 60, 90 and 120 minute versions of their IPA. ...


1

Wheat malt is easily able to convert itself without further diastatic power form other malts. Unmalted wheat does need help, though. And these days, 2 row malt has nearly the same diastatic power as 6 row. The notion that 6 row is necessary to help other malts convert is outdated. The reason you see barley malt in most wheat beer recipes is for flavor, ...



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