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7

Yes, it is OK squeeze. In fact, you want as much extract as possible from the specialty malts. It is a common myth that squeezing the grain bag is a bad idea due to "tannins being extracted" or similar. There is no reason for this to be true --- tannins are extracted from the grain (husk) only if the temperature during steeping/mashing is too high. And then ...


6

The sludge is mostly coagulated proteins, hop residue. A little bit is actually good for your wort, as it provides nutrients for the yeast. Too much might give the beer some slight off flavours. If you were to let the sludge into the fermenter, it wouldn't be the end of the world, but you'll make better beer if your exclude most of it. So, to answer your ...


3

It does not need to be 5.00000 gallons, don't worry about the small differences. You can aerate after pitching the yeast, so long as it's immediately after; the yeast need oxygen during the lag phase, but once alcohol starts being produced, you don't want to introduce oxygen at that point.


3

Nope, at this level everything scales pretty linearly; double up!


2

Those old Brew Your Own recipes are a little vague on ingredients, and hard to figure out. You have an added handicap of being in the Eurozone, it seems. Likely the 3.3 bs. of amber light extract is LME (because in the U.S. they sell it in 3.3 lb. cans and plastic milk jugs), and you can substitute a 1.5 kg can of Coopers Light Malt Extract or the Premium ...


2

If you're using a Northern Brewer extract kit like this one, you should get pretty close to the OG if you fill your fermenter to 5 gallons. A good kit should account for some of the water evaporating away during the boil. It should also assume that some hop residue (trub) will be left behind in the boil kettle. The wort that you pour from the kettle into ...


2

You want to preserve the ratio of 2-row to Crystal 60L. Here is one simplified way to do the math. 2-Row has an average, theoretical extract yield of 1.036 specific gravity -- if you take the last two digits (36), you can express this as 36 gravity points per pound of grain per gallon of wort (PPG) at 100% efficiency. The recipe assumes a mash ...


2

You should boil the extract to kill off any nasties. (In reality it's probably not that big of a deal, since it should theoretically already be sanitary coming from the manufacturer, especially if it's canned liquid extract) The point of adding extract late is to prevent your wort from darkening. Boiling the extract for the full 60 minutes will cause the ...


2

Yes: you can add your own hops while boiling malt extract. It's not really a "step up" or a "step down". (Also, FTR, you almost never "boil" grain … you can either steep it or mash it, but it should not be boiled (unless you're talking about decoction mashing, but that's not what you're talking about).)


2

I always put the grain bag in a strainer and pour 2-4 quarts of 155-160f water slowly through the bag to remove anything additional from grains. This is the extract brewer's sparge equivalent. I've never read anywhere that squeezing was a good thing, but I have read from several reliable sources that it's a bad thing.


1

I wouldn't recommend cold steeping, at the heat of the water is an important part of extracting all the sugary goodness that is inside the grain. Typically, you'll want to steep the grains in 152F water for at least an hour before you bring the wort to a boil. I have read some forum posts in the past, though, where the wort was left to cool overnight before ...


1

Sake both ferments and converts rice starches to sugars at the same time (think fermenting in the mash) so an extract version of sake isn't really going to turn out tasting like sake. I made Sake long before I switched to all grain brewing you don't need a mash tun since you're basically mashing in your fermentor, so don't let your lack of being an all ...


1

I have never seen nor heard of an extract for sake.


1

(1) As far as hops and other sediment (trub) in the kettle, it is fine to pour it all into the fermenter if you want to. Some will say that some of the coagulated protein can provide nutrients for yeast. It will all settle out during fermentation, and there is no evidence that it contributes to off-flavors. That being said, it is hard to allow oneself to do ...


1

You can add as much water as you would like. The only difference is what your Original Gravity (OG) starts fermentation at. If the recipe calls to top of the fermentor so you hit the 5 gallon mark, then the recipe is going to take that into account with the grain bill. If you want to make sure you're not diluting your mash, then take specific gravity ...


1

In general the kettle sludge from an extract batch isn't going to hurt things any. As long as you perform a strong healthy fermentation the beer will be ready for transfer faster than that sludge will significantly effect the beer. The hop part of sludge may contribute some more hop resin depending on when it was added to the boil originally. The larger ...


1

Alcohol comes from the fermentation of sugars. Fermentation is the process by which microbes (often yeast) transform sugar sources into ethanol (alcohol) The source can be anything as long as the sugars are indeed fermentable by the yeast being used. Distillation is the mechanical means by which alcohol is separated or purified from the solution that was ...


1

You're right - normally you'd store it cold so it can drop clear before packaging. With a wheat beer you don't want or need to do that, or at least not to the same extent. Note that in a wheat beer the haziness comes from both the suspended yeast and the protein in the wheat malt. It takes a long time for the protein to drop out - several weeks, and at ...


1

I don't think its really necessary to store beer before bottling. When the beer is done (another topic all together) its usually ready to go into the packaging phase. If you are observing best practices already with fermentation and the like store it to wait for something mysterious to happen isn't necessary. That said, a week in storage isn't going to ...


1

There's no need to split each grain into its own bag, unless you want to remove them at different time intervals for whatever reason (hint: you don't. ;) If they'll all comfortably fit in one bag, great. If not split them up. Maximizing water contact is … probably negligible, here.



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