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The extra head space is fine. You need some space for the krausen which will build up on top of your beer. If it didn't have space to build up, it would eventually stop up your airlock and could either blow out the airlock or pop the lid off your fermenter. Here is more info on the krausen. A head of foamy krausen will form on top of the beer. The ...


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The fermenter should not be full to the brim, there will be at least a couple cm of foam (kreusen) on top of the beer when the yeast get going. Without space, it will try, and succeed, to get out. There should be no gaps in the fermenter. In theory, small gap wouldn't be so bad during the primary fermentation because the kreusen and the flow of CO2 will ...


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Are the bottles that you are using screw tops? That might be the problem. Although some people have had success, others complained about leaks How are you capping? Maybe you are causing damage by using too much force. Test: place a balloon or condom over a bottle. If the item inflates, you have a leak. if it does not, open the bottle (after 2 weeks to ...


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It hard to diagnose this without pictures, numbers, etc... Maybe you overprimed, maybe you didn't. Over priming with good caps = beer volcanos. And explosions. And a big mess. So maybe there is something wrong with your caps, bottles, or capper. Leaky caps should have held some gas, giving you random levels of carbonation. The only time I ever had a ...


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200L? Wow. You might consider using a length of copper tubing with slits cut in it, instead of a false bottom. My mash tun came with a false bottom which was always a bit of a pain to get nicely into place. One day I replaced it with the copper tube thing and I love it! I have since replaced my mash tun with a larger one, but I'm still using the same ...


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I think you have the right idea about sealing the rim of your false bottom. The common method is to use a length of vinyl tubing slit lengthwise. The false bottom fits into the slit as you wrap the tubing around it.


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You’re basically all set. However, Sake is very temperature sensitive throughout the process and the rice needs to be steamed. Fred Eckhardt http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Eckhardt Fred Eckhardt’s book http://www.amazon.com/Sake-USA-complete-breweries-homebrewed/dp/0960630287



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