Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

The basement is a good place to brew as long as the temp is constant and it is dry. However, if you have the means, I recommend finding an older refrigerator or chest freezer to use as a fermentation chamber. Connect an external thermostat and you can have a humidity controlled, temperature controlled, light-free, clean Fermentation chamber anywhere.


5

Well the easy answers are this: Light exposure - One assumes that since it's in the basement that won't be a problem. Temperature - Not only ambient temperature, but whether or not the fermentation vessel will be on the concrete, which will leech heat. Type of beer you brew. Lagers and saisons aren't going to get made in the basement closet. :-) Out of ...


5

Don't worry about the CO2 from the fermentation. That was recently CO2 in the atmosphere anyways. See, the barley plant used it to make the barley seed. Then you made the barley seed into wort. And the yeast made the wort into CO2 (and beer!). As Disney taught us, its the circle of life! Now your heating method for your kettle? That's a different ...


2

Yep, it seems it does affect it. You will get lower carbonation at higher elevation and also the boil temperature is lower in higher elevation. See a forum post and communication on HomeBrewTalk: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/effects-altitude-carbonation-1523/ "The other issue is when you drink the beer. Since you are at altitude when you open and drink ...


2

I'm thinking of covering a wall in my brewery (aka the garage) with various six-pack boxes -- probably just the side, cut out. I have a lot of six-packs as well, but my recycling company takes them, so they'll take the cuttings or any that I don't want.


2

Those are not wax coated. And you can recycle them. Does your recycling center accept cardboard boxes from children's toys? Do they accept magazines? Do they accept old posters? All pretty much the same thing. You'll know wax cardboard when you see it. It does not get as easily damaged by moisture as regular cardboard. And you usually have to seek it out.


2

If you know anyone that likes to wash and/or detail their car(s), they could use the six-pack boxes to store their car-care products. It would be worth asking them if they would like to use your six-pack boxes for storing the bottles of products. One example of how i use them: I store the products that deal with interior in one six-pack box labeled ...


2

Next time you're at your local brew shop see if they'll take em off your hands. They might leave them as a freebie for anyone who wants to take em. The brew shop I go to sometimes has used equipment left by brewers for cheap or free. MoreBeer sells blank 6 pack carriers for $0.95, so there's probably a homebrewer who'd pick em up. ...


2

Since recycling won't take them, you might try talking to the store you bought the 6-packs from originally. Every liquor store I have been in has a "build your own 6-pack" option from their singles, and they have a basket of those boxes sitting out for people to use for their selection. They might be willing to take them back to reuse for that. I will note ...


2

If you happen to have a room with a lot of plants, put your fermenter in there, they'll love it, and convert the CO2 back to O2.


2

Since the closet is in the basement I would check the following: Temperature. If your fermentor is too cold then your fermentation may never take off, or it may be sluggish and give out before the beer is fully fermented. If your fermentation is too hot, then the yeast will produce off-tasting chemicals that might make your beer taste a little bit like ...


1

if you are comfortable with the temperature variances, then making cider outside should be ok. Although you should cover in a tarpaulin or other thick plastic sheet - the UV radiation may kill the yeast, or at least reduce it's capacity.


1

Airlines routinely select their wines and foods to account for taste differences during flight, nothing that they taste typically less sweet in the air, although this is more to do with the in-flight conditions - pressurized climate, dry air dehydrating passengers, harsh light, engine noise etc, all go to affect the perceived taste of the wine and food. In ...


1

Temperature is the most important thing to consider. You want the ambient temperature to be about 5 to 10 degrees cooler than your target fermentation temperature (varies by style)--active fermentation increases the temperature of the fermenting wort by that much so you want to keep it cool. In addition to the specific temperature, you want to make sure ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible