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6

Putting 10.5kg of grain in 11.5 litres of water will kill your efficiency, unfortunately: From Braukaiser: Traditional British style infusion mashes are with about 2-2.5 l/kg (1 - 1.15 qt/lb) very thick and German style mashes are generally much thinner (3.5-5 l/kg / 1.75-2.5 qt/lb). Historically this is rooted in the fact that the latter needed to ...


4

65% is not bad. Most recipes only expect 70%, so you're not going to be that far off to begin with if you are getting 65%. I wouldn't do partial mash unless you want to. Use Beer Smith or BrewTarget and just adjust your recipe for your efficiency. Read up on how to calculate efficiency first. Understanding your volumes and gravities at each step will help ...


3

Don't worry too much about increasing your efficiency. The important thing is is have an accurate measure of it. Your first mash showed an efficiency of 65%, so go with that until you've done more brews and narrowed it down. I don't know much about all grain kits, but they must make some assumption about efficiency and include the corresponding amount of ...


3

Sure, it would change the color, but isn't the color already altered due to the increased density of the wort? By adding water, you'd be diluting the SRM back to what you originally expected. By having a higher extraction yield, you will suffer a slight loss in alpha acid isomerization (likely not all that noticeable with an 8%+/- efficiency difference). ...


1

I don't think there is a typical conversion efficiency for homebrewers since it very much depends upon the nature of the equipment. Mash tun shape/depth and use of recirculation will have a big impact. If you pushed me for a figure, I'd say anywhere from 80-98% is typical for mash conversion efficiency. I measure the SG of the wort continually throughout ...


1

Palmer is referring to U.S. customary measurements. One U.S. gallon is 3.79 liters. One liter is 0.26 U.S. gallons, or 1.05 U.S. quarts. For the U.S. customary measurement system-impaired (i.e., the whole world except the U.S and maybe parts of the U.K.), a U.S. quart is slightly smaller than a liter, and there are two 8-ounce cups in a pint, two 16-ounce ...



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