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2

I'm with everyone else. 5-7 days. To get that super hoppy aroma though, I've only been able to get that by using a hop back with first-wort and dry-hopping (clone W. Coast ipa, greenflash). For less than $30 I built a hop back and filtered the wort through loose leaf hops of the same or similar variety I was already pellet-hopping, just prior to chilling, ...


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You should be get a pretty good hop aroma with just dry hopping for the last couple of days in primary. That's always been my plan of attack and it's worked well compared to dry hopping at other periods of primary.


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YMMV, but when we do it, we'll actually wait until primary is nearly finished before dry hopping. If you move to secondary, you could actually pull it off the yeast cake for re-use without getting a ton of hops stuck in your yeast. 4-7 days is good at the end of primary/beginning of secondary should get you want you're after. If you're looking for a HUGE ...


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Trial and error. There is no definite answer. I haven't achieved yet great aroma, so far dry hopped in primary in last couple days. I would add 5 oz per 10gl. Read an article saying its better to dry hop it in keg or closed vessel. Aromas can escape with CO2.


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You want your beer to be hoppy-fresh... Unfortunately, hoppy profile fades away with time. I'm not sure at what rate, but trust me, there is a difference in freshly brewed IPA (brewery fresh) vs the 1 or 2 month old. If you save couple of bottles for the future, you can compare. So, usually when you look at the recipes, it says to dry-hop it in last 5-7. ...


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Loss of gravity is not linear. It is fastest at first. For really big beers it may take month or two. Also, it depends on temperature, initial availability of nutrients and oxygen, pitch size and so on. For 1.065 OG ≈ 16°Blg, I would left it alone for two weeks and don't even bother measuring anything during that time. 1.030 OG ≈ 7.5°Blg is too far from ...


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my experience has been that 3-5 days total is plenty for dry hopping, post fermentation and as close to kegging/bottling as possible.


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I just stopped by my favorite home brewing store this morning and I also had a question about dry hoping. I read somewhere that when dry hoping if you use hop bags, they should be sanitized first by boiling them but the gentleman at the brewing store said just dump the hops into the secondary fermenter. I asked him if that would cause a problem when it came ...


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In my experience grassy notes come through when hopping at cold temps. I've tried to salvage some old IPAs with a cold dry hop and filtering with little success when they are at or below 55° while it kinda works, they have always gotten a grassy note flagged by at least one judge. For a lager the last real effective time for a dry hop is during your ...


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I would simply dry hop before I started the lagering process. Do it in the bucket you are in with a sanitized sack. Then you can pull the sack and proceed with your lager phase. There might be some hop debris that makes it through the sack but it shouldn't be noticeable or a problem.


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Dry hopping has a chance of introducing the bacteria that have formed this film, but does not itself cause it. If the brew is still tasting good, keg it and drink it, so long as you have alcohol in there then no pathogens will be able to replicate. I would not bottle as there is a chance of them going Bang! Sometimes these accidents can create great sours. ...



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