Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

There is an infection risk any time you open up your fermenter and especially when you throw stuff into it. If you dry hop at the right time you reduce that risk. The alcohol built up protects against infection The hops already in the beer act as a preservative The pH is unfriendly to new growth Most of the easy to eat sugars are already consumed For ...


13

That quote you posted is a mess. I don't even know what they're trying to say there. Yes, dry hopping will add bitterness, but not in the usual sense (which is iso-alpha acids). Dry hopping is done cold, so there is essentially no isomerization of alpha acids going on, which is what normally happens in the kettle boil. The bitterness that comes from dry ...


9

I've tried weighting and not weighting and found that it makes absolutely no difference. I hate doing unnecessary work, so I no longer weight the bags.


8

It helps, but is not necessary The more the hops are exposed to wort the better the aromas and flavors will transfer to the beer. Use something you can sanitize - smooth like marbles, coins, washers or silverware. It shouldn't lay on the bottom of the vessel; instead, suspend it in the middle of the brew. Brew Strong recorded an episode all about dry ...


8

You can unclog the diptube in place, but it'll just clog right up again. I'd say your best bet is to siphon the beer to another keg, trying to leave as much sediment behind as possible. I would also stick the keg in your fridge for a few days to help coax the hops and proteins to the bottom of the keg. If that's your only keg, siphon to a sanitized ...


8

Yes, you should wait. The escaping CO2 will carry off the hop aroma you're trying to get through dry hopping. It's best to remove the beer from the yeast completely before dry hopping. There is an interaction between yeast and hops that can cause the hops to produce a very floral, rose-like ester which can be disagreeable.


7

I know you specified carboy, but for those looking to dry-hop in the keg, it's also important not to have the bag sink to the bottom and sit over the outlet. You pull out all sorts of nasty sediment and flavors that way, particularly when using pellet hops. I've managed to solve this by throwing both a sanitized ping pong ball and a sanitized washer in the ...


7

I will sanitize a mesh bag, put the whole hops in the bag, roll it up and shove it up near the top of the keg, between the dip tube and the keg wall. When you drink about a gallon of your beer, the hops will be suspended above the beer preventing over-exposure. I've done this at least a dozen times with great results.


7

You don't need to do anything to sanitize the hops. By the time your beer is going into a secondary, the alcohol and pH make it very resistant to infections. Just make sure to use a fine mesh bag. I didn't do that during my first attempt at dry hopping and it was almost impossible to get all of the hop particles out of the finished beer :)


7

1. Should beer be transferred to secondary for the purpose of dry hopping? If so, why? A lot of it is down to personal preference. If you're not doing a secondary for other reasons, then racking to secondary can be considered unnecessary. The main reason for doing a secondary solely for dry hopping is that racking from primary and avoiding trub is tricky ...


7

In my experience, dry-hopping is more important for aroma than flameout additions, unless you either go overboard with your flameout quantities or you do a hopstand. You may get a very slight bit more flavor out of a flameout addition, but my palette can't detect the difference. During fermentation, the CO2 will carry a lot of the aroma with it as it ...


6

There is a thing called a SureScreen that can slip over the dip tube of the keg so you can dry hop in the keg. Here's the description from Northern Brewer: "The SureScreen is a welded stainless steel screen that slips onto your racking cane or keg dip tube and filters out fruit or dry hops from the fermenter or whole hops and trub from the kettle. Also ...


6

Joe's answer is great and I would rack to a new keg if all else fails. There's something simple to try first: bleed off almost all the CO2 in the keg then blow out any hop material in the beer dip tube by connecting the CO2 tank to the beer out line. (You can put the CO2 connector to the beer out post on corny/firestone kegs, don't know about pin lock ...


6

I usually just boil the hop bag and string for a couple of minutes. I've not used dental floss - I'm not sure that fresh minty taste is needed in the beer. I use starsan for pretty much all my sanitation duties, but my reservations about using starsan here are that it may not penetrate deep into the material of the hop bag, but really this is probably ...


5

The easy answer is don't use a bag. I usually use whole flowers when dryhopping. They float on top and then I rack to another carboy when done w/ the dryhop. I used a bag 2x and it was a royal pain in the butt. Getting it out was always the hard part, brute force was my method. It always made me worry about contamination.


5

There is nothing to be gained from that practice, really. I can't imagine why anyone would go to the hassle of doing that.


5

A lot of brewers that make excellent dry-hopped beers have a limit to how many days they leave their beers on the dry hops. For example, this presentation on IIPA's by home brewer Nathan Smith (PDF), says that Firestone Walker only uses dry hops for 5 days, and Smith suggests a maximum contact time of 7 days. And Smith summarizes the purpose of multiple ...


5

There is no significant advantage to do this as far as I can see. Here is my reasoning: When you account for using pellets vs. whole hops we typically only consider it a 10% utilization gain. Pellets are completely pulverized and you only get a 10% increase. Slicing hops in half or even quarters you'd be looking at probably less than 2-5% increase, still ...


5

OK, maybe this is a little weird answering my own question after I marked mdma's response as the answer. I want to share things I learned outside of the Exchange as a potential answer for future readers to consider. I listened to (most of) the Brew Strong podcast and took notes. My new understanding is that dry hopping is as much a matter of style as any ...


5

Nylon is usually pretty safe to put into beer. You should wash them and sterilize them before putting them in the fermentor. If you boil them that should do the trick, and so long as there aren't any holes after boiling should be fine to use.


5

Dry hopping in primary is totally fine, I do it all the time. It does the exact same thing. The main reason for secondary is getting clearer beer, but I never do secondary as it increases the chance of oxidization and infection. I get very clear beer without secondary just by cold crashing and letting it sit for a while. After kegging/bottling, just let it ...


5

If your recipe is written as one once by weight, which I can't think of any reason why it shouldn't be. You should be fine with dry hopping and late additions. So as long as the pellets are the flavor you are going for you should be fine. I dry hop all the time with pellets and I don't use bags or strainers and I get excellent flavor and no haze problems. ...


5

If you do this you should soak them in a little bit of vodka - effectively making a tincture. There are three reasons why: control: The alcohol will leach the essential oils and you can add the tincture a little bit at a time until you reach the flavor you want sanitation: Juniper berries especially can be used as a fermentation starter as they have a ...


5

The oils aren't produced from dry hopping, the oils are in the hop cones themselves. Its the stuff in the lupulin glands of the cones that contains the oils. I usually see the oil floating on top of the beer in the carboy. But that likely isn't the only place the oil goes. Its pretty sticky stuff and a lot of it sticks to the yeast, proteins, trub and ...


4

Yes, you should weigh down the bag. Use sanitized marbles or a spare stainless steel fitting to weigh down the bag. Here is a link to the Brew Strong episode discussing dryhopping.


4

I've put hops for dry-hopping into a sterilized mesh bag (note* the bag was boiled in a pot of water and cooled with lid on to RT before adding the hops). I then squirt the outside of the bag with a squirt-bottle filled with grain alcohol. This kept things sterile and allowed for hop infusion without messy hop bits ending up in the final beer.


4

No need to filter. Just rack carefully from underneath them with the time comes. Many people dry hop with pellets withou bags.


4

Yep. I dry-hopped my last brew by just dropping the pellets into the carboy and it had a great aroma. The pellets broke up and sunk and then I just racked without disturbing the sediment.


4

I've often wondered about how to get more of that wonderful aroma in the beer, but unfortunately, I don't think adding a few oz of grain (cf. dry hopping) will add any appreciable difference, considering that the aroma that is there has been produced by several pounds of grain. (Although the wort was boiled which may drive off aromas.) Just thinking aloud, ...


4

Haven't seen any scientific stuidies on the topic, but I'd be very surprised if this was the case. For one thing, I don't know that hops affect yeast activity. Secondly, by the end of primary you've got a large, healthy colony of yeast. Adding an ounce or two of hops shouldn't make any difference. You might want to think about waiting until fermentation is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible