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6

If stored properly (no humidity and at room temperature or lower) the DME should preserve itself at least for a year. It has been discussed before: How long will an extract kit stay good? In your case, if the seal was good, after a month it should still be fresh and you can use it without concerns... Manufacturers will mention that "Storing opened bags ...


6

First, for an IPA, that recipe looks a little low on the late hop additions for flavor and aroma for modern US-style IPA. Did you add the 1 oz of cascade as a dry hop called for in the recipe? Their recipe page has it listed on the same line with the yeast rather than the next line, and maybe you missed it; I know I missed it on the first read through. If ...


5

Measuring the OG post boil isn't the right place because if its off, how do you fix it? You'll have to calculate how much you are off and what amount of DME to add, all the while the wort is sitting hot, but cooling. The hop profile will be changing slightly as it sits hot. If you add the DME at this point you'd have to stir it to get the DME well mixed, ...


5

If your yeast are in great shape and you are pitching the right amount, then there is no need for concern over it being a little sweet in the end. An extra half pound will raise the gravity by only 4-5 points for a 5 gallon batch. So go for it.


4

I bulk prime with DME, so it takes me 3 to 6 months to use a 1kg bag. I reseal the bag quickly, and place it in an airtight plastic container after pouring out the amount I require. No observable deterioration takes place.


4

I have done tests using corn sugar, cane sugar, brown sugar, honey, DME and force carbing, then doing blind tastings. Not a single taster could tell which was which nor expressed a preference for one over another. The other problem with priming with DME is that you don't know how fermentable DME is, so you have no way of accurately priming your beer. ...


4

Assuming you boiled the DME with water, and chilled, then there's no problem. Old DME may not taste especially great, but it still has all the sugars and free amino nitrogen that the yeast need, and is still fit to function as wort for a starter. Before pitching, decant a little and have a taste of the starter. Not only will this let you sample some of the ...


4

In short, no. Any LME you end up with will be super-dark. Dry malt extract requires flash drying with high pressure nozzles and is not a home operation. Briess has some explanation of the process. The technical nature of creating DME and LME is more than can be done in the home. It's even harder to do than malting your own grains, which is difficult ...


3

If your beer had a Belgian-type yeast character, that's a sure sign you fermented too warm. This is especially important with English ale yeasts. A buddy of fine ended up with a decent Belgian Blonde by letting his pale ale with WLP007 Dry English Yeast ferment too warm. Definitely not the Pale Ale he was shooting for.


3

You need to measure your gravity at least twice -- once at the start of the boil, and again at the end. Measuring your pre-boil gravity will let you know if you've extracted too little (or too much) sugar from your mash. Then you can adjust with DME or water to get your pre-boil gravity right. Adjusting your gravity at the start of the boil is nice because ...


3

I would assume they mean liquid malt extract as the specifically mention dry light malt extract below.


3

There are two key variables in a yeast starter - the volume of wort and the gravity of the wort. The volume principally determines how many cells you get out of the starter. The gravity also has some affect, but most texts recommend a gravity in the range 1.030-1.040. This is to avoid too high stresses on the yeast, and also because oxygen dissolves more ...


3

Stored cool, dry and out of sunlight, DME is good for 2+ years. The main issue is with it picking up moisture, when it then becomes clumpy. But once boiled it's still good and you can use it up to 5 years in small quantities (say 1-2lb/0.5-1kg in a 5 gallon batch.)


2

From the first item in the search results for "briess dme shelf life": Briess "Product Information & Typical Analysis" sheet for a similar DME [PDF Warning] STORAGE AND SHELF LIFE Store in a cool, dry location. Unopened bags best if used within 24 months from date of manufacture.


2

It matters a little bit. The advice I've seen is that a wort of around 1.040 is best for a yeast starter, presumably because that's the optimal level of fermentables for yeast propagation. 1/2 cup of DME in 500ml of water yields a gravity around 1.040. So the wort from 1 cup in 800ml will have a higher gravity -- somewhere around 1.065. The yeast will not ...


2

Many of the award winning recipes in brewing classic styles call for sugar additions, and significantly more than a priming amount. I think that's a myth unless your adding a huge amount. Also, although DME would work, it is a little harder for your yeast to ferment. I would think in a big beer, feeding stressed yeast maltose is more likely to leave a ...


2

I take it out of the bag and put it in a bowl or something to pour from. Then I pour slowly while stirring. Minimal clumpage.


2

(1) Yes, you can use a mix of DME and LME in your recipe, but it will affect your recipe. You would be better off using all Bavarian wheat DME. The classic recipe book, Brewing Classic Styles, calls for an American Wheat Ale, for example, to be made from 100% wheat LME having a color of 4°L on the Lovibond scale. Using less wheat will de-emphasize the ...


2

Based on Northwestern's website (http://www.northwesternextract.com/brewing/malt/), their Gold LME is equivalent to light LME (not extra light) from other companies. It falls right in between their Extra Light and Amber LMEs. Based on this Home Brew Talk thread (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/what-gold-lme-126714/), the last post explains that Briess also ...


1

DME loves to suck up humidity and turn to a brick of sugar if it can. What I do is cut the corner off the DME bag. Using a large mouth plastic bottle (gatorade) cut the top off 1 inch from the cap. Remove the lid and stuff the cut corner of the DME bag up through and fold back. Replace the cap for a nice airtight seal. Then I store the DME with my ...


1

It's too late for this beer in my opinion. Adding DME+water could work at a really high concentration. I have never done this, but there's no reason why that wouldn't work. But that seems more trouble than its worth to me. A new starter should not be necessary. To be honest, you should have left the extra sugar out. That's just going to thin it out and ...


1

DME is very easy to work with when adding to cool water. It's a pain to add to hot wort (like a late addition) as the heat makes it clump. If you are adding it to wort (like from steeping grains), it's easiest to add it to a separate container with cool water and stirred first. In the end, the yeast will eat the clumps, but it makes it near impossible to get ...


1

I would say that the amount of corn sugar used for priming is so small as to be largely unnoticeable. However, I see no reason why out can't prime with DME, you'll simply need to figure out exactly how much DME to use (and probably still dissolve in water to aid in mixing evenly) to hit your specific carbonation target. A useful calculator for this can be ...


1

In general, if the beer tastes too sweet, you'll need more bittering which comes from hops. I might try adding a couple hop additions, perhaps like this: 1-2 oz - 60 min 1 oz - 20 min 1 oz - 10 min Dry Hop 1-2 oz You can add even more, if you want. My base IPA has: 2oz - 60 min 1oz - 20 min 1oz - 10 min 1oz - 0 min 2oz Dryhop Edit: For aroma, see ...


1

The other thing to consider is your water. Hoppy beers like IPA really benefit from an elevated sulfate level to accentuate the hops. You might try adding a tsp. of gypsum to the kettle next time to see if it helps.



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