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10

I have seen a light gate used to sense bubbling in an airlock to measure fermentation rates. Very slick implementation and obviously useful data. Paired with a temp-controlled environment, one could control the rate of fermentation by adjusting the temperature, instead of just relying on a set temperature.


7

Well...yes :) If you want to have a ferrule on your handle like this: then you need the hangar bolt and ferrule. The hangar bolt has 5/16"-18 male threads on the ferrule side, while the ferrule has 5/16"-18 female threads on the top, and 3/8"-16 female threads on the bottom. If you want only wood at the bottom of your handle like this: then you want ...


4

To best mimic the function of a racking-cane tip, I would crimp or plug the bottom of the tube and punch two opposing holes about 1/2 inch up the side of it so the liquid being siphoned it is above the trub. Then attach something rigid (like a strait section of plastic coat hanger) to the tube to stiffen it (after sanitizing well of course). This way you ...


3

Seems like a good idea, especially if you tested it with boiling water it and it worked, and you sanitize it well. You would also want to make sure your siphon and tubing are all good for hot liquids. The only potential problem I can think of is that borosilicate glass (which I'm assuming is what your condenser is made out of) is very resistant to ...


3

I believe Papazian indicated 1/8th inch holes.


2

A lot of brewers use silicone tubing for hot liquids, but there's no reason aside from cost not to use it for racking as well. That will take if the tubing part but you've still got to deal with the racking cane which is rigid. Copper or stainless tubing could be bent into the correct shape.


2

The Electric Brewery is a very popular source for building electric homebrew setups when using steel/aluminum kettles. They sell prebuilt heaters and they also give a list of all the parts they use so that you can buy them separately elsewhere (e.g. Amazon) and put it together yourself: http://www.theelectricbrewery.com/heating-element-kits I personally ...


2

I believe the Brewtroller project http://www.brewtroller.com/wiki/doku.php is based on the arduino platform. It has grown into custom boards, interfaces and such but I think it still has a stock arduino package that you can use as well.


2

The Brewer's Association has the excellent Draught Beer Quality Manual freely available as a PDF (see the upper right corner of the page for the download). It discusses what you'll need to account for: both line length/resistance/elevation change calculation for balancing serving pressure, and long-draw cooling options (forced-air or glycol).


1

I would say the most important thing is a well-drilled hole. Scrappy, poorly-drilled holes make it difficult to fit the component parts in and can make it possible for bacteria to collect between brews. Often you'll be hooking some kind of hose to the outside of your valve, so gravity will do the work. I think for tightness-of-seal you're right - you ...


1

If you're going to go to the effort of including an arduino in the system, then it would be a good idea to also use that for temp control with a more sophisticated algorithm. The Johnson controllers use simple thermostat algorithm which overshoots on heating or undershoots on cooling, simply because they switch on or off when the setpoint is reached, but ...


1

There's another pretty nice board out there LPC1769 LPCXpresso board (LPCTools.com). It's an ARM Cortex-3 processor with a complete development environment, all the software is free, including and Eclipse-based IDE (that's integrated development environment for the non-coders out there). The board itself costs 30 bucks, and all you need is a USB cable to ...


1

I've seen one used as a temperature controller for mashing. Basically turning a water heating element on and off to maintain a constant temperature.


1

I never did it, but I was poking around with using one to adjust the flow-rate of my strike water, so I could maintain a particular temperature while mashing in. I have heard that Corsair uses one in their distillery, but I don't know if that's for the distillation process, the brewing process, or both.


1

This may be helpful with respect to constructing a box from the foam: http://home.roadrunner.com/~brewbeer/chiller/chiller.PDF I made one of these chillers (powered by frozen jugs of water) and it works quite well. The only advice I would give is to make absolutely certain that your cuts are square when you cut the foam. I would recommend a table saw or ...


1

I would suggest that you siphon with "just tubing" as you suggest. You can reduce the uptake of trub by adding a filter to the end of your tube. Muslin bags and panty hose both work great. Just be sure to sanitize them by soaking. You can also reduce uptake by simply keeping the end of your siphon above the trub for the majority of the racking time. If ...


1

You could try using those heating mats/ribbons used for tile floors and just wrap it around your fermenter.



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