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9

A while ago I visited a local meadery and chatted with the brewer (meader?). He was planning on making use of a local micro-distiller's equipment to produce a spirit from his mead. I asked him the name of the resulting product, and his answer was "distilled mead". Not the answer I was hoping for. I've never tasted such a thing and suspect that the subtle ...


7

No way. You will kill everything in your beer at this temperature. The pasteurization process actually uses lower temps, probably with less exposure time, and kills them all. And its ok to use any beer yeast to carbonation, you don't need the same strain.


6

According to Wikipedia there doesn't appear to be much in the way of a family name for it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mead I think the closest would be "Midus" Midus: Lithuanian for mead, made of natural bee honey and berry juice. Infused with carnation blossoms, acorns, poplar buds, juniper berries and other herbs, it is often made as a mead distillate ...


5

Assuming that all of the proceeding is accurate, would it not just be a "honey brandy"? I can imagine a very sweet flavor with an interesting aroma and probably fairly drinkable if not pleasant flavor. I know that mead was popular in Egypt, Turkey, etc. since the dawn of civilization and you can't be the first person in human history to think of this so I ...


4

I have my own family recipe that I have recently cooked off made from clover honey. We have always called it honeydew whiskey even though it does not meet description standards of whiskey. Its what I have heard several old timers call it


3

Turbo yeast is faster than beer yeast, so no bacteriae have much chances to proliferate. Even if there is a bacterial or wild yeast infection no one cares, as that fermented stuff is distilled. For that matter, whisky distillers don't sterilize their wort before fermenting it, and some level of bacterial infection is considered necessary for the ...


3

After I made my still, I was anxious to get started distilling. I had a five gallon carboy of strawberry mead that was made to about 15% ABV and was less than a year old,so I used that. It was wonderful right off the still, with flavors from both the strawberries and the honey. I double distilled, using a stripping run and a spirit run. It was good clear, ...


3

I once heard a name for this called "drakas"(spelling). As told it was a Norse drink made by placing a bowl of honey mead outside overnight. In the morning, chip off the ice and repeat a few times untill a thick drink was the result.


2

When I have distilled mead, I have called it "Mead Moonshine" when un-oaked and either "Mead Whiskey" or "Mead Brandy" when oaked. Although the name "Mead whiskey" is not very accurate, the product tastes more like whiskey than brandy to me. If you were to make mead with some fruit (pears, strawberry's, oranges etc) I would go with "Mead(& ...


2

If you're talking about Scotch whisky, the answer is yes! And it's known as "distiller's beer", made from just barley, yeast, and water. Some more info here: http://www.maltmadness.com/malt-whisky/beginners-guide-04-distilling.html


2

In general, yeast will die at temps exceeding 115F.


2

I grew up making beer, hard cider(a type of wine), applejack(concentrated hard cider through freezing) and wine at home. My father's friends made corn whiskey and gin. I have done hours of internet searches about various alcohols and have come to these conclusions. Whiskey is distilled from beer(Beer is from fermented grains). Brandy is distilled from ...


1

The process of freeze distillation exploits the difference in freezing points of water and ethanol. Wikipedia has a good article that explains the process. The short explanation is that the frozen portion of the liquid has a lower concentration of alcohol than the liquid portion. By removing the ice, you can thereby increase the concentration of alcohol in ...


1

I would like to argue that distilled mead is not a brandy product as brandy is distilled wine and i believe the distinction for wine is a fermentation from fruit or berries. Honey is a sugar product and its my opinion that it should therefore be considered a Rum.


1

Aguardente de mel is what we call it in portuguese... Literal translation to english is Honey's burning water


1

Whiskey is typically made primarily from corn (fermented in the same way as beer) and then distilled. The trick is, after distillation it has to be aged in wood barrels for a couple years, which is what gives it the flavor and color. Technically you can distill beer. If you do it a couple times you'll basically end up with the same spirit, which can then be ...



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