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The purpose of degassing in wine or mead is to benefit the yeast. CO2 is toxic to yeast and inhibits the yeast's ability to fully ferment the larger amount of sugars in wine/mead. Degassing mead is highly recommended during primary fermentation to help the yeast, even if you plan on making a sparkling mead. I'm curious about whether beer would benefit from ...


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Wine is degassed because it is served still. "Still" is a term that means not-carbonated. Beer is carbonated, so there is no need to bother, since you are introducing CO2 to the beer anyway. Mind you, there are phases of beer production on certain styles where you are essentially degassing, (diacetyl rest) but that is for different reasons than why you ...


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The oxidation in wine you get from vigorous degassing is minimal compared to beer, and those flavors are actually beneficial. The cardboard or paper flavors that brewers fear from post fermentation oxidation are a result melanoidin based molecules. Melanoidins are very low in wine. They sell those wine whips that attach to a drill for a reason. Whip away ...


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You should be agitating the wine or mead without sloshing it. The agitation happens under the surface, which causes the co2 to be released. There should be little or no motion on the surface, and certainly no splashing. This next point is a bit controversial - for mead, don't worry about oxidization - the oxidization of honey is apparently actually ...


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I'd say you might be fine. Since a carboy has a slim neck, you probably didn't get too much oxygen in while the CO2 escaped. Is there any reaon not to do the "puff" test now? If you were to bottle with a lot of gas in the bottles, you could get exploding bottles, corks shooting off or simply sparkling wine - depending on the amount of CO2 left.


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You probably have malolactic fermentation happening in the bottle. Apples are high in malic acid. If any oenococcus got in there-- it's ambient and lives in wood, often found in barns, garages, etc-- then it will eat the malic acid and produce lactic acid-- which is what makes Chardonnays buttery. The bacteria lives in oak, and is why we associate oak ...


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I haven't done a whole lot of degassing of wines myself, generally if you let them bulk age long enough they degas on their own (which is what I usually do). Here's an article on degassing that may be informative: http://homewinery.info/viewarticle.php?id=46 It sounds like you needed to do a lot more stirring to degas your wine. I've also heard of people ...


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I don't think that a bubbly surface and harsh taste is a signature or inadequate degassing. If the wine fermented out to a 12% alcohol product, then fermentation was pretty good. The yeast would have consumed much of the O2 in the wine after pitching. Perhaps some of the off flavors then is related to fermentation temp or the must itself. I don't know a ...



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