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7

First of all, in order to think that melanoidin is a sub for decoction you have to believe that decoction has an impact on flavor. My own experiments, as well as those of others, do not support that. Melanoidin will boost the maltiness of the beer in a kind of sweet, fruity manner, as well as have an impact on flavor as you describe. Too much of it will ...


6

No, you really don't want to boil the entire mash--that would denature all the enzymes! You'd end up with a very starchy beer. With a traditional decoction mash, you typically wait 15 minutes, then pull 1/3 of the mash (a thick pull: mainly grain plus a little wort) to be boiled. The reason behind this: what's pulled contains relatively little enzymes, the ...


5

You most certainly can do a decoction at home. And decoction does more than just increase the temperature of the mash. The primary reason for it is melanoidin production in the wort. This creates a complexity of malt flavors in the wort that might not be there otherwise. I have several friends that have done it. Watching it being done its not hard, just ...


4

Most all-grain homebrewers actually use multiple infusion mashes, usually with two steps (amylase rest and mashout). My experience with decoction mashes are that they are a lot of work, lead to a slightly darker and slightly drier beer that keeps its hop aroma for a longer time, as compared to infusion mashes. I attribute the hop aroma issue to driver off ...


3

Decoction mashing evolved in the days before thermometers were invented. It was a good way to reach appropriate mash temperatures without knowing the specific temperature of the mash. Those early brewers must have been through much trial and error before they figured out how to make decoction mashing work. Many modern commercial breweries still use the ...


3

A decoction mash will not extract tannins because the pH of the mash is too low. For a single decoction, you boil the grain, leaving as much of the liquid behind as possible. The enzymes remain in the liquid, not the grain, so you will not denature them by boiling. If you do a second or 3rd decoction, you include more liquid. At that point, conversion is ...


3

A decoction mash is removing a portion of the mash from the rest, boiling it, and then adding it back into the mash to raise the temperature. It's something akin to today's step mashing. However, you can get better efficiency doing a decoction mash as boiling the grain's cell walls are destroyed and allows for better access to the grains starches by enzymes. ...


2

Five percent of your grain bill is generally a good starting point for Melanoidin Malt contribution. Be cautious using more, as Melanoidin Malt has a very powerful and distinct flavor. I think I've also seen a comparison somewhere on the internet between decoction mashing and Melanoidin Malt, so maybe Denny will weigh in on this one...


2

Here's a page with probably everything you'd want to know about decoction mashing: http://www.braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php/Decoction_Mashing


2

No, but I'm fascinated. The writeup you linked to seems pretty comprehensive. It does seem like a really nice way to get the benefits of a decoction while saving yourself the labor involved in a decoction. Some concerns: You'll get DMS formation in the enclosed environment, but any that is formed should be readily boiled off as normal during the ...


1

Looks good. The first rest in the 140s will create a fermentable wort, while the later rest around 160 will help create body and foam stability. However, I don't think the rest times are long enough to be practical. When pulling the decoction, you have to raise it's temperature (possibly slowly so not to overshoot), let it rest for 15 mins, and then also ...


1

I do not have personal experience, but I have researched HERMS systems. This article may help: http://sdcollins.home.mindspring.com/HERMS.html This author seems to think that claims of temperature change significantly greater than 1 degree/minute are probably not true and may be disingenuous.



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