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17

I started cropping and repitching from my third batch ever. It is not hard at all, actually results in better beer, saves money, and is kinda fun. You get to use flasks and pour stuff back and forth and rub your chin and look wise. This article from the Wyeast people is geared toward commercial breweries, but I learned a lot about cropping from it. I ...


4

I've been listening to Basic Brewing Radio. Here are some episodes about reusing yeast. November 1st, 2007 Reusing yeast February 7th, 2008 Advanced yeast handling February 26th, 2009 Carboy top-cropping September 3rd, 2009 Yeast Ranching October 27th, November 3rd, November 10th, 2005 Interviews with Dave Logsdon of WYeast


3

Well, the easiest way to re-use yeast is to brew a new batch on the same day that you're transferring another batch into kegs/bottles and then rack the new wort onto the leftover yeast cake. Bam. You've re-used yeast. At home, I have a handful of Erlenmeyer flasks and extra stoppers. Basically what I do is make a mini-starter with the yeast that's ...


1

Seeing how you'd be scaling up quite a bit from a slant to a solid starter culture, I am not sure it would really matter whether you take it from a bottle or from a primary yeast cake. Personally, I think the better idea is to streak out a plate first. Reason being is because if you pick up some bacteria or other microbe from the carboy/bottle, you'll be ...


1

I'd use the yeast from the fermentor, as it's going to be the healthiest yeast. Make sure your fermentation is complete first, so you get a good cross-section of early and late flocculators. The yeast in the bottles will largely consist of the least flocculant cells. Of course, if you're just saving yeast from beer that you're brewing, you could make ...



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