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4

Clarity of wort has no bearing on the clarity of the finished beer. Beer clarity is much more dependent on things like proper pH and mash conversion an d a large amount of flour should have no effect. My crush is very fine with a large amount of flour and my efficiency ranges from 80-85%. Based on that, it's difficult to believe your wort loss is solely ...


4

No, I don't think a smaller crush will cause haze. The flour particles are fairly heavy and will clump together in the boil, and would definitely drop out during primary. (I use a fine crush and have not seen haze from that.) For other causes of haze, see What causes cloudiness in beer?


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A good crush should keep the grain husks intact, since they will then filter out the flour and provide an efficient lauter. I also crush reasonably finely, which does produce some flour, but as long as the husks are intact you're good. I have a 3 roller mill - the sales pitch was that it doesn't pulverize the husks as much as a 2 roller. I've not used a 2 ...


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If I were going to attempt to do this I'd use a squirt bottle. I'd weigh the grain. Then I'd measure out water to 3% of the grain weight. 3% to account for over spray and evaporation. I'd warm the water some, or at least make sure it was at room temp ~70-75F. Put the grist bill in a large bottomed party tub. Spray the top layer slightly. Then mix the ...


3

I disagree with Denny's assessment. Compare the theoretical results of not crushing them to grinding them into a powder. The the first case you'll get little flavor/color; in the second you get maximum flavor/color. So the crush does indeed have an important impact. The key is to do it the same way every time for consistency brew to brew. That way an ...


3

"The best solution for even, consistent mills is always the local HBS.". I'd have to disagree with that. All too often, I hear from people who get poor or inconsistent crushes from the LHBS due to constant readjustment of the mill there. The absolute best way to consistently get the crush that works best for you is to own your own mill. That may not be ...


3

I have put malt in a 1 gallon ziplock bag and crushed it with a rolling pin. I have done up to 5 pounds that way in the past. It was touch but it worked. I am sure efficiency suffered. Although, I never experienced any tannin issues from over crushing the hulls. I have also used the bottom of a flat drinking glass. But that was just for a few ounces and ...


2

When you steep your grains the main goal is to extract mainly color and flavor from the grain, a bonus of the process is you will get some starch conversion to sugar. In order to extract the color and flavor the grain does need to be crushed in the same manor as an all grain mash. I believe that due to the relatively small amount of specialty grains ...


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I have no idea what the gap on my mill is set to, and I don't really care. Learn what a good crush looks like and how it acts in the mash tun, and settings won't matter to you. Not to mention, a setting that works with one person's system might not work for another's. Keep in mind that you're making grist, not gaps! The finer you mill your grain, the ...


2

I'll answer with a method that you shouldn't use - don't use a coffee grinder. It's pretty obvious that you don't want to use a blade grinder, but I thought about using a burr grinder set to the coarsest setting to mildly crush my grains. Before doing so, though, I searched the web and all accounts I read basically said it's called a grinder and not a ...


1

And you should use the same amount of water for steeping as you would for mashing to avoid potential tannin extraction due to pH. The grain has a natural tendency to reduce the pH of your water. The darker the grain, the more it will drop pH. pH, not temp, is the #1 culprit in tannin extraction, so if you use too much water the grain won't be able to ...


1

It might be their mill, or it might be that your system isn't capable of dealing with properly milled grain. What kind of efficiency were you getting from the other shop that milled your grain? If it was good, then I'd say the mill at the new shop may be set too fine. If you were getting low efficiency before, you might want to consider changing your ...


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To really verify their crush, you'd need some kind of sizing screen. For a quick check, though, I'd just dump a cup of milled grain into a sandwich bag and shake it a bit. You should be able to see how much flour or really fine particles are in there. If you've got a lot of small stuff, then their mill is too tightly gapped. Doesn't sound like they're ...


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Ok, this is an ancient question but I'm going to add my process since it is considerably different. First, I don't think I'm 'properly' conditioning the grain in terms of substantially hydrating it. Instead my goal is just to add a touch of moisture to reduce the dust and hopefully keep the hulls a little more intact. I take a very small amount of warm ...



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