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10

Reuse your yeast. If you're making multiple batches of the same beer, or even two different beers that require a similar yeast strain, you can pitch your (chilled) wort directly onto the yeast cake from the previous batch. If you're not planning to use the yeast again right away, you can wash the yeast and store it for later. This topic on HomebrewTalk ...


9

If you mean "is it less expensive to brew your own beer", I'd say not usually, although it will depend to some extent on where you live and the price of beer there. Sure, you can make very low cost beers that may end up less expensive, but they may not be the beer you want to drink. There are ways to cut costs by buying ingredients in bulk, or reusing your ...


5

In Canada, where I live, beer, wine and spirits are heavily taxed. Good craft beer costs between $6 and $9 per liter. My homebrewed beer costs around $1 per liter in ingredients. (I buy malt and hops in bulk, and I reuse yeast across a number of batches.) Suppose I go through 200 liters in a year, that's a savings of at least $1,000. Of course, I've spent ...


5

I like your interest in efficiency. I've always added maple syrup after primary. It creates a second fermentation, but if you add it during the boil, you lose much of the aromatics and get a harsher, woodier flavor. This is true to a lesser effect if you add the syrup before primary, so to avoid flavor and aroma being carried away with CO2, you should add ...


4

Really, selling your homebrew is not worth the hassle of licensing requirements and so on. The 2003 Licensing Act states that the sale by retail of alcohol requires a license. And you will certainly come under food standards trading requirements too. Give your beer away to friends, and ask if they can return the bottles. Same outcome as your suggestion ...


3

Because I am such a sad individual I wrote a rather elaborate spreadsheet to document my spendings, because I was bored and I like to tinker. in my defence I use it a bit like a diary. I'm not a heavy brewer (yet) and I am relatively new, but here are my figures. !SAD ACT ALERT! I have brewed a total of 94 liters (25 gallons) of homebrew (inc ...


3

Looks like you'll need an "off-license" and specifics vary from country to country, even within the UK: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_licensing_laws_of_the_United_Kingdom Realistically, if you're just selling to friends, you can slide under the radar. In the end, it's only 50 pints, which obviously doesn't merit the trouble of getting a license. ...


2

You may want to consider using fenugreek instead of maple syrup. That would definitely fall in the realm of experimentation since I haven't used it personally and can't offer ammounts to use or when. But, it may be able to give you the maple you want at a lower cost, and lower impact on your OG/FG.


2

Going to add another Canadian response to complement Tobias'. Here, even cheap bear is expensive. The lowest legal price beer can be sold for here (Ontario) is $29.35 per 24 standard longneck bottles. That is where the very bottom-of-the-barrel cheap beers site. Think Lucky Lager, Lakeport (Lakewater) etc. This is $1.22 per bottle. If you want a 'premium' ...


1

For me, I usually disregard economics when I am homebrewing. How come? Well, most of the homebrew beers I make are clones of styles that I cannot get in Oregon. For example, New Glarus Spotted Cow. Since I cannot get these brews where I live, the cost of making them is nil (or even more expensive since I would have to drive to the location to pick up the ...


1

So far, all I buy are the prepackaged extract kits and I am very happy with them (and so are my lucky friends). not including the equipment, the boxed ingredients cost me between $25-$35 depending on the recipe and so far, my favorites are the ones hovering around $25. I net about 2 cases from this. That;s about 6.25 to 8.75 a 12-pack for beer that tastes ...


1

Well, homebrewing has not been cheap for me. I spent well in excess of $5000 on my brewery and probably the same again in kegs and other equipment. But I have a room where I can brew comfortably, and have the equipment to serve it so it's at it's best. I enjoy for the most part the beer that I make. I still drink bottled beers, and often find I prefer my own ...


1

Where I live in the US, I'd say a typical home-brewed beer still costs about 60% [in ingredients alone] of what it would cost to just buy the beer. It can easily cost less than that to brew, but it can easily cost much more than buying beer, as well, if you really want to get crafty or make something good/special. On the other hand, you didn't say you were ...


1

Don't sell alcohol, sell raffle tickets in an “everyone is a winner” scenario, and trade them in for the beer. It is an absolute loop hole. I know of a few establishments around London that use this technique and have been getting away with it for years (due to refusal of license), also, think of the amount of booze on offer at any raffle table (it’s almost ...


1

DMEmart.com, buy hops by the pound and reuse your yeast. You should be able to brew a batch for under $25/5 gallons. Under $30 if you wanna church it up. I got into homebrewing young, like full grain brewing in high school (parents thought it was ok, long as I didn't get drunk) and gave up the hobby in my 20's cuz I got sick of paying 200+% markup to ...


1

When you include the high price of extract, liquid yeast and hops if you use a lot of them, $40 is about average - it's not high if you are starting from a recipe and not buying a kit. You can get down cheaper with a kit, but I think you'll find the kit will probably have less in it than the recipe and you'll learn more from using a recipe vs a kit. It's ...


1

Personally I've been looking into the exact same thing, my preferred store is morebeer because they have free shipping and pretty good prices. Look at sites like homebrewtalk and see if you can find a local group organizing a bulk grain buy.. and instead of getting bulk grain, get bulk DME which if you spend the time breaking it out into freezer bags or ...


1

I could recommend a place to shop, but you're in Montana and it's in Vancouver BC, so I don't think it would be very helpful. But if you have access to a store like it which sells bulk liquid malt extract, that stuff can be pretty cheap. Even though you said you didn't want to go all-grain, I'd suggest you at least look into it. It might be cheaper than ...



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