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1

Yes. The relation between temperature, pressure and volumes of CO₂ are true at higher-than-fridge temperatures, as well. The biggest difference is that with the higher pressure required for the carbonation at the higher temperature, you'll need longer beer serving lines to resist the extra pressure to get a reasonable pour without foaming. Let's say ...


1

Yes, the 8" line length of the "Flexi-tap" kit is going to require a much lower serving pressure to pour without excessive foam. The ~5' line length of the "Beer line assembly" will let you keep the ~10psi head pressure to retain ~2.2 volumes CO₂, and serve at the same pressure.


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This is the closest to "low profile" that I have seen. http://www.morebeer.com/products/ball-lock-bev-stainless-flared.html http://www.williamsbrewing.com/STAINLESS-STEEL-GAS-BALL-LOCK-BARBED-P3877.aspx


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Just to expand on something jsled said regarding the handheld CO2 charger; those small cartridges do not contain sufficient CO2 to carbonate a batch of beer. They can be used for dispensing beer that has already been carbonated by other means. They are handy if you want to be able to take a keg camping, over to a friend's house, or just out in the back ...


2

It's too much of a shopping list, and especially to start off. For kegging, you need: a keg ;) a way to introduce CO₂ a way to dispense beer From what you've listed, you will need either: the regulator, and also: a CO₂ tank to go along with it (not listed) gas-line tubing from the regulator to the gas quick disconnect (QD) you listed the gas QD you ...


3

It depends on how your system is configured, mainly on the length, inner diameter, and material of the liquid lines. This article explains it better than I could. Most home draft systems seem to settle in somewhere between 8 and 12 PSI. You don't need to turn off the gas. There is only so much CO2 that will dissolve into the beer at a given temperature and ...


1

Move to a cold country and leave the kegs outside. :p I have a chillplate that I put into my fridge. I store the keg and CO2 on the one side of the fridge, beerline goed into the fridge, through the chill plate and out the other side to a mounted tap. Works like a dream. * I have NOT tested the system in the heat of summer (35C), but so far it is working ...


4

Keep an eye on Craigslist for a used refrigerator. You can often get them free or nearly free if you pick it up. That's all you need: take the shelves out, and you can keep your keg in there with a picnic tap. I did this for about 15 years in my basement. If you want to get fancy, you could get a kit to put a faucet through the side so you don't have to open ...



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