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10

From the Wayback Machine, we can track the increase in price of both new and used kegs. NorthernBrewer.com is a good resource for this because they've been around so long. (And they deserve it. You guys rock!) April 2001 to May 2006: New $95.00, Used: $30.00 May 2009: New $120, Used $35 May 2010 - Unchanged at $130/$35 March 2012 (present) - $130/$45 ...


10

First, go to your living room. Trust me.... Flip over your easy chair and shake it all around. Trust me... Flip over your couch. Don't eat the crusty old cheetos that fall out. Trust me, I am not insane. Gather up the loose change. Unlatch the lid, the keg pressure will keep the lid closed. The wedge a penny under each foot of the lid latch, between ...


8

Are you keeping it hooked up the whole time to the CO2? You will lose carbonation overtime as the carbonation in the beer will push the beer out of the keg when not hooked up to the tank. You can prime your kegs with sugar like bottling to carbonate. Treating the keg like one big bottle, but most people hook up the beer to a tank with regulator and force ...


7

Well, do make sure the beer is cold before doing your pressurize and shake. The colder the liquid, the more CO2 it can absorb. Otherwise, you can't go much faster than you mention as far as I know.


7

They are slightly differently sized. In particular, the grey gas fitting will fit over the "out" post, but the black liquid fitting will not fit over the "in" post without significant pain. But, yes you should treat them as the separate things they are.


7

No, it will not. A concern you might have if the keg was full would be the sudden foaming as you depressurize, which might overflow the keg. But at 1/4 full, no problem. If you're concerned about O₂, don't be. You'll have a keg full of heavy CO₂, and will only open the lid for a few moments, not enough time for any substantial O₂ to mix in. If you're ...


6

I can't tell you how many times I've hooked up a picnic tap with it in the locked-open position :) But yes, it does sound like you overfilled the keg. That's the only way beer can come out the gas-in post. The gas-in diptube is quite short, but I still like to give it an inch or so of space just to make sure beer can't get back into the diptube. It will ...


5

Replacing the seals is usually a good idea. Seal Kits are inexpensive. A good how-to on replacing seals is helpful. The one tricky bit about o-rings is that certain types work best with certain kegs. This is especially true of the o-rings that sit between the dip tubes and the in/out ports. With the right o-rings, you really don't have to apply that much ...


5

You may be better off using corny kegs as a secondary fermenter. (If you transfer.) I use them as brite tanks, clarifying my beer a week before serving. There is no risk of krausen explosion You can naturally carbonate You can transfer to the serving keg under pressure No worry of clogging your dip tube Don't need to trim the dip tube. Most stories I hear ...


5

Look into "spunding valves", either to buy or DIY. Often used for natural carbonation, but it could be used to control primary fermentation pressure, as you suggest.


5

I've done just this for my last 30 batches or so. It's lovely, and I see no reason to go back. I fill the corny to the weld line, bubble some oxygen up through the liquid diptube, and then connect my spunding valve to the gas connect. The spunding valve is just a pressure gauge and an adjustable pressure relief valve attached to a 1/4" stainless tee. To ...


5

Keep an eye on Craigslist for a used refrigerator. You can often get them free or nearly free if you pick it up. That's all you need: take the shelves out, and you can keep your keg in there with a picnic tap. I did this for about 15 years in my basement. If you want to get fancy, you could get a kit to put a faucet through the side so you don't have to open ...


5

If you completely purge the keg of CO2 and let it sit for 10minutes and the beer pushes itself out with the regulator shut off then the beer is potentially over carbonated. If the beer was overcarbed a simple burp of the keg and setting to 10PSI doesn't fix it. There is still CO2 that has to come out. Multiple burps and rests are required. A spunding ...


4

Its probably from having too high of a humidity level in the fridge. I have this same problem in my fermentation fridge (develops darker spots of mold) and my keezer (no mold but moisture pools at the bottom of the freezer). I just make it a point to wipe out the excess moisture from the walls of these two whenever I am messing with beer. I have considered ...


4

That's about the fastest method I know of. But, I've stopped doing it. It might just be me, but I've found I prefer a slightly slower approach. I'll turn up the pressure for 2-3 days and let it sit in the fridge until at the right pressure. It might not make much of a difference, but the carbonation feels different in my mouth.


4

You should be OK. The connectors are not identical inside the keg. The beer out connector has a long tube to take it to the bottom of the keg. The gas in connector is open near the top of the keg. This is so the gas pushes the beer up the tube from the bottom. By reversing the posts you are effectively pushing the beer out the top of the keg by bubbling CO2 ...


4

I think what will end up happening is something like… After lag and reproduction, the yeast will start to ferment, and pressure will build up on the fermenting corny. This will slowly push still-fermenting wort into the second carboy, though perhaps following some of the trub that will have settled out first. At some point, the two cornys will reach an ...


4

You can use the pressure from fermentation to transfer from the fermenter to a serving keg. First, you'll want a spunding valve on the fermenter to control the pressure by releasing gas after the target pressure has been reached. When fermentation is complete, pressurize the serving keg with CO2 to slightly less pressure than what's showing on the ...


4

Are you sure they're not there? I ask because I have six pin lock kegs, and two of them have tiny gas dip tubes that are maybe a quarter of an inch long. (Just long enough to hold the O-ring.) They usually stick inside the gas post when I remove it. I can attest that these short dip tubes work just fine. To answer your question, though, you will need dip ...


4

Yes. The relation between temperature, pressure and volumes of CO₂ are true at higher-than-fridge temperatures, as well. The biggest difference is that with the higher pressure required for the carbonation at the higher temperature, you'll need longer beer serving lines to resist the extra pressure to get a reasonable pour without foaming. Let's say ...


3

Ball lock tend to be the most available around my parts in MA. And like you said parts are easier to come by for these too. As long as you keep the fittings in good working order (i.e. clean them once in a while), they go on and off fairly easily. The only issue will ball locking posts is that its sometimes difficult to remember which on is the out and ...


3

6 months later and having used both king keg and corny keg there is one major point to add: Force carbonation with a corny keg comes the additional expense of a CO2 regulator but with this comes the capability to accurately control the pressure of CO2 on your beer and get the level of carbonation you want (something I struggled with previously). It was ...


3

Small batch fermentor. Sanitizer holder for long items like racking canes, spoons and tubing.


3

Simple. Manufacturers need to recognize the demand. They may transition to just a homebrew offering, but where there's demand there's business to be had.


3

Real Ale, that's "beer brewed from traditional ingredients, matured by secondary fermentation in the container from which it is dispensed, and served without the use of extraneous carbon dioxide". (CAMRA) As homebrewers, we can emulate this by: Not pasturizing our beer...(ok that was easy!) preparing the corny for use as secondary/fining/dispensing ...


3

I think it should be fairly simple to adapt to corny kegs (in fact there is a picture of the fridge filled with corny kegs.) You have QDs for the kegs, so you have the connectors needed on the keg side. You also need hoses and connectors to connect the keg to the tower and to CO2: to beer in on the tower: push 6-10' of 3/16" beer line over the barbed beer ...


3

The current going prices for reconditioned kegs are closer to $60-70/ea on other sites, a bit less if you're willing to put up with cut handles or other minor deficiencies. $40/keg is a good deal. $12/keg is too good to be true. :)


3

I contacted CornyKeg.com, the people who created the video. They said that the video they created was erroneous and that static relief valves do not need to be replaced if they have been used. Here's a quote: I am not sure why that video is even on the internet anymore. Those static relief valves will reset and usable again. As long as they do not leak ...


3

I see a potential problem in that as the first waves of beer flow out into the secondary keg, they aren't yet done fermenting. So its like you're racking some of the beer to secondary on the very first day of fermenation. I would worry that this would shock the yeast somehow in the secondary keg and you'd get a stalled out fermentation there. Furthermore, ...


3

I'm from Brasil, and the kegs found here always came from coca-cola, and have the pin-lock as standard. Here you can't find the ball lock ones. All the kegs I've ever seen here has this kind of lid, or something a little different: This ones uses the kind of pressure relief valve you cited in brewchez' answer, and is always screwed from the bottom of the ...



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