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4

There are a lot of products that are available. Most are a heatsink or piezo electric coolers, claiming to cool 30° below ambient. Really depends on your fermenter type carboy, bucket etc. It's worth a Google. Having not tried them I can't point you to a good one. BrewJacket is the only one that I've seen that interest me.


3

It would help in a couple ways if you gently stirred the wort with a sanitized spoon as it cools. First, it will make it cool faster. Second, you'll get homogenous wort so you'll get an accurate temp reading no matter where you check it.


2

I place the fermentation vessel in a room that naturally has lower temperature than I desire for fermentation. Then I place a small heater inside the room and control power to the heater with a temperatur sensitive socket insert. That way I use the rooms natural temperatur to lower the fermentation temperature, and the heater to increase it. This works nice ...


2

You can put a wet tshirt or towel over your fermenter and have the evaporation cool the fermenter. Like with the ice water bucket, you'll have to check back on it every once in a while and change the tshirt or towel.


2

I use the brew bag here. I throw a couple of 12oz frozen water bottles in there, and it drops the temp from room temp about 4-5 degrees. I switch them out 1-2 times a day. In my case, since I'm only doing ales, that works as I keep the temperature about 66-68 degrees.


1

Brewpi and an old fridge that someone has given up on and has set on the side of the road waiting for trash pick up. Hack the fridge with brewpi like components and control your fermentation remotely.


1

25 min is not too bad, you can reduce flow rate, to increase transfer time but this adds time to your brew day. Or you can use colder water if you get your counter-flow water down to 40F then you will either be able to increase the flow rate or reduce the temperature of your wort. You don't want to pump the wort for 2 reasons: 1. will likely increase flow ...


1

There is one correct place: The same place that you used last time. :) The critical part is that you take a reading at the same place as this will give you consistency in your process. There is one "bad" place: the bottom of the kettle. Depending on your equipment you may get a high reading because the thick bottom is retaining heat, or showing a very low ...



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