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17

There are a few methods, each with advantages and drawbacks. Cool your Kettle Take your hot brew kettle, full of wort, and submerge it in ice water. Advantages: No real equipment expense, just take your pot and put it in a cooler or bathtub full of ice water. Drawbacks: Extremely slow, higher risk of contamination. Probably have to change out the ice ...


9

Find a 4.2 cubic feet (or larger) minifridge on craigslist. I usually see them go for around $50 to $70, but YMMV depending on where you live. With the shelves removed, 4.2 cu. ft. should be large enough to hold a carboy. Grab a temperature controller and use it with the minifridge. This will allow you to regulate the exact temperature inside, making it ...


8

I always thought of this as being a HUGE no no. But I guess not...below is from John Palmer. People often wonder about adding ice directly to the cooling wort. This idea works well if you remember a couple key points. Never use commercial ice. It can harbor dormant bacteria that could spoil your beer. Always boil the water before freezing it in ...


7

Wort chillers operate by transferring heat across a surface - the hot wort and the cold water set up a temperature gradient, so heat flows between them across the material of the chiller. Copper has a thermal conductivity of around 380, while stainless steel has a conductivity of around 20. If you built two chillers that were identical apart from the ...


6

No, there is nothing necessarily wrong about using topping off water to cool your wort. But there normally isn't enough topping off water to cool the wort to pitching temperature by itself without applying an additional cooling method (the math is below). One reason to cool quickly to ideal yeast-pitching temp is to allow the yeast to get a nice head start ...


6

Cheapest = Brew in the winter =P


4

Well your aeration method will be more efficient if done while cool. As the warm wort won't hold as much dissolved oxygen. Furthermore, the warmer the wort the faster oxidative (staling) reactions will occur. When I make lagers I chill with my IC down to 65-70F, transfer to my fermentor then put it in my fermentation fridge overnight to get it to 50F (...


4

This is how I do all of my brews. I usually boil about 11/12L for a 20/21L batch, put a filter over the primary bucket, pour the wort in from a bit of a height to help aerate, add ice until I get the right temperature then top up with water. The "right temperature" might be a couple of degrees above / below target, depending on whether the top up water is ...


4

Hehe, bad idea - you couldn't have a beer on brewday since you'd have to stay sober to handle this with appropriate care! But seriously, I'm wondering that if you have to ask the question about suitability then you are probably not familiar with handling liquid nitrogen. As well as getting suitable training, you would need equipment that is designed to ...


4

You could buy or build a jockey box. It's just a coil of stainless steel or copper immersed in ice with a spigot at one end a quick release at the other, all inside an insulated container. It doesn't cool the keg down, but rather cools the beer as you're serving it.


4

There are a lot of products that are available. Most are a heatsink or piezo electric coolers, claiming to cool 30° below ambient. Really depends on your fermenter type carboy, bucket etc. It's worth a Google. Having not tried them I can't point you to a good one. BrewJacket is the only one that I've seen that interest me.


3

Really, it's about aroma vs. flavoring or bittering hops. The longer it takes for your wort to cool, the more those late hop additions turn from aroma hops to flavoring (and to some extent bittering) hops. For less hoppy styles, this obviously isn't as big an issue, but if you want to make an IPA or APA with that hop "nose" you'll want to cool quickly. ...


3

Sorry, but your beer is probably not going to be drinkable. If you're lucky, the wort was infected by a wild yeast. In this case, it may taste a little funky but will still be beer. The more likely scenario is that your beer was infected by bacteria or mold, and will be unpleasant or undrinkable. Since you've already pitched the yeast, you might as well ...


3

The cooling effectiveness of the coil is a function of several things: Contact surface area Contact time The difference in temperature between the warm beer and cool water. The MoreBeer Draft Box has 50 feet of 3/8" tubing, providing about 700 square inches of contact surface versus your proposed 69 square inches. So I would say you need to run the beer ...


3

I do something similar, I keep my fermentor in a big rubbermaid bucket filled with cold water. If I need to make it even colder I drop in water bottles that are filled with ice, as they melt, I swap them out for others and put them back in the freezer. I don't have temp controlled fermentation (yet) and this method seems to help keep the ferm temp somewhat ...


3

It would help in a couple ways if you gently stirred the wort with a sanitized spoon as it cools. First, it will make it cool faster. Second, you'll get homogenous wort so you'll get an accurate temp reading no matter where you check it.


2

This seems to be cheap and easy solution. If you have a cooler, you can probably pull the whole thing off for $20. http://www.bayareamashers.org/gadgets/Jim%27s%20minimalist%20fermentation%20chiller.pdf


2

Move to Minnesota, nature's refrigerator/freezer, where I live? Controlling added heat is much easier when your entire garage is 36-38F for 4 months of the year and you don't have to do much to get the cooling side of things.


2

The wort should be flowing through the copper tubing in this case, so heat shouldn't be an issue. Copper is also great because it transfers heat well. If you have a control over the flow rate of the wort, then the length isn't really that important. Realize that the longer the length of copper, the faster you'll be able to run the wort through and cool ...


2

The cooling rate is going to depend on how cold your cold water is and the flowrates of the hot wort and the cooling water. From my experience, I've had a hard time finding food-grade hose that can handle boiling liquid and still seal reliably against a plain copper hose. If you can get a barb fitting, you'll have an easier time. EDIT: I should clarify--...


2

Copper should in theory transfer heat faster than steel, but the steel in most stainless steel wort chillers is so thin that the difference is negligible. I prefer stainless steel chillers as they are very easy to clean and maintain.


2

Not really, unfortunately. Heating is a much easier mechanical process than cooling is, and as a result cooling applications tend to be more involved and more expensive. You have two options: 1) You could get a glycol chiller of some sort. A glycol chiller is usually a standard refrigerator compressor used to circulate liquid. Works well, but it's ...


2

If it's a style suited to souring, maybe it'll end up interesting… :S But you left un-sterilized sugar-water alone for 6 days. Bacteria reproduce really fast, much faster than yeast actually, but the side-effects of a healthy pitch of yeast usually crowd them out. I don't have high hopes. If you're limited on fermenter space, dump it and get the next ...


2

I use the brew bag here. I throw a couple of 12oz frozen water bottles in there, and it drops the temp from room temp about 4-5 degrees. I switch them out 1-2 times a day. In my case, since I'm only doing ales, that works as I keep the temperature about 66-68 degrees.


2

You can put a wet tshirt or towel over your fermenter and have the evaporation cool the fermenter. Like with the ice water bucket, you'll have to check back on it every once in a while and change the tshirt or towel.


2

I place the fermentation vessel in a room that naturally has lower temperature than I desire for fermentation. Then I place a small heater inside the room and control power to the heater with a temperatur sensitive socket insert. That way I use the rooms natural temperatur to lower the fermentation temperature, and the heater to increase it. This works nice ...


1

I use two of the above methods. I purchase two gallons of purified water and put them in the freezer. I get them slushy and add them to my wort while it sits in a sink of cold water with two bags of ice added. So far so good!


1

You will want something to strain your hop material before going into the pump and chiller … either a hop spider or a hopback-like device. You could conceivably use gravity to run the wort from the kettle through the chiller, but … this is slow (not necessarily a problem, as you'll want a relatively slow wort flow) and (somewhat) assumes you will chill in a ...


1

How worried should I be about contamination that may have occurred during two days of air cooling this wort? Honestly, I'd be very worried. However, not much can be done now anyway, so don't sweat it, but don't do this again for future reference. As that wort cooled, it contracted in volume slightly, which created a very slight vacuum that might have ...



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