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11

In short: 4.2 lbs DME DME = 0.84 * LME LME = 1.19 * DME The whyfor It depends on the manufacturer. Extracts and malts and adjuncts all have a "points per pound per gallon" rating that you can look up from the supplier. In general, dry malt extract gives you 44 pppg and liquid 37 pppg. 5 pounds of LME gives you 185 points. To get the equivalent points ...


7

First, a little history. Joseph Lovibond developed the Lovibond Scale in the 1860's, as a means of implementing quality control into beer production. The Lovibond Scale works by having the user visually compare the shade of a substance to the nearest shade of colored disks. Thus, determination of a color on the Lovibond Scale is a human estimation, rather ...


4

IMO, yes it's pointless. First, it's pretty much impossible to not get conversion given a sound recipe and hitting your mash temps. Second, as you've noticed, it's more than possible to get a false reading. I haven't done an iodine test in the last 13 years and haven't felt like I needed to do one.


4

Firstly, I think your conversion to extract is off. You'll need 8.25 lbs of dry or 9.8 lbs of liquid. (See below) You can get amber, wheat and Munich malt extracts. This leaves you with 3.75 lbs of steeping grains - a much more manageable amount. Some wheat malts are a half-and-half mix of wheat and 2-row malts, so be sure to adjust your amounts ...


4

In the mash, starch is converted into sugar, which is further broken down to fermentable & unfermentable sugars. There are a lot of things going on in the mash. Like the question says, conversion is the process by which starch in the brewing grain is converted into sugar which can be used by yeast in fermentation. There are conflicting sources citing ...


3

It affects mainly the quantity of grains you need to produce a particular beer. Beers come out great with low efficiency, you just need to use more grain to produce them. On a homebrew scale, efficiency doesn't really make significant cost issue. Some people maintain that lower efficiency (e.g. no sparge) can taste more malty than beers where higher ...


3

Yes, at typical mash temperatures (ca. 150-156F), the beta amylase works in tandem with alpha amylase and limit dextrinase - the latter two enzymes reduce the number of limit dextrins, giving more opportunity for the beta to do it's work and produce a more fermentable wort. Although your mash temperature was on the high side, there will still be some beta ...


3

Well, I don't have references. But I do know that when enzymes are "inactivated" by heat they are irreversibly denatured, destroying them. I'm not sure precisely what you want to have clarified, but the fact is that the only active enzymes will come from your uncooked, active mash. You cannnot "reactivate" the destroyed enzymes.


3

From what I understand, the formula is: °L = (SRM + 0.6) / 1.35 However, for all values light enough to be visibly different to the human eye, L=SRM. They only start splitting when you get too dark to be visibly different without a spectrometer. More Discussion / Source


3

Short Answer Steeping CaraPils is fine. The Reasoning One of the goals of mashing is conversion, which breaks down starches present in grain to sugars that yeast can eat. Some malts are converted in the malting process making it unnecessary to mash for conversion. The HomebrewTalk wiki lists "mash req'd" column on their malts chart indicating which malts ...


2

So I think the converted recipe would look like this. I ended up getting the ppg's from a bunch of different places, so I'm not positive they are right. Anyone see any problems? Amber: 1.5 * 32 * .7 / 37 = .91 Wheat: .5 * 38 *.7 / 37 = .36 Munich: 2 * 32 * .7 / 37 = 1.2 Pale: 14 * 37 * .7 / 37 = 9.8 Recipe Estimated Stats (at 70% brewhouse efficiency) ...


2

Grains that don't need to be mashed fall into two categories, crystal malts and highly kilned malts. The crystals - you're right that they can't "self convert" but they don't need to - the conversion is already done. So they don't need to be mashed - their sugars can be extracted by steeping. The chocolate and other highly kilned malts are usually used in ...


2

Although this author advocates just buying flaked grain, he has a good description of the process: http://hopwild.com/2009/02/18/cereal-mashing-bother/ You can also check this link for photos: http://www.ingermann.com/cerealmash.html


1

Palmer is referring to U.S. customary measurements. One U.S. gallon is 3.79 liters. One liter is 0.26 U.S. gallons, or 1.05 U.S. quarts. For the U.S. customary measurement system-impaired (i.e., the whole world except the U.S and maybe parts of the U.K.), a U.S. quart is slightly smaller than a liter, and there are two 8-ounce cups in a pint, two 16-ounce ...


1

It's not the extract specifically that's the problem but the lower utilization resulting from the higher gravity of a partial boil. If you're not doing a partial boil, then no need to scale. But if you are, then your main recourse is to scale the bittering hops to match the target IBUs, as you've done. Scaling the FWH addition is interesting, since as well ...


1

Seems strange to me that so many people are prepared to trust their own "untested" experience to know when a mash has got complete conversion. Kind of like an electrician saying I've never tested if circuits are live before working on them so testing is a waste of time. I mean don't get me wrong, it is not the end of the the world if your mash did not ...


1

I think you've already answered your question, really. Grains "need" to be mashed if you "need" their sugar contributions for the OG. If you're just looking for flavor/color contributions, then you don't need to mash. If the grain is particularly starch, that might be an undesirable contribution based on how starchy, what percentage of the mash it is, ...


1

There is a one to one correspondence as the SRM is the absorption at 430 nm and one can calculate the density at 430 nm of a Lovibond series 52 glass. The series 52 glasses are 'made up' of Lovibond R and Y glasses and the only people who can tell you what the composition of a series 52 glass are the people at The Tintometer Ltd and they used to do this in a ...



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