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18

...and after pitching yeast (6 hours), noticed yellow clusters of what I think was mold Mold isn't going to grow within 6 hours of chilling down the wort. What you saw was clumps of yeast from your pitch stuck to the sides of the fermentor or floating on top. Did you rehydrate your yeast (if using dry)? What I'm getting at is can mold cause slowing ...


16

In short, no. Otherwise beer making would have never made it out of the middle-ages. The acidic environment and low alcohol does a good job of stemming most pathogenic bugs. Certainly some microbial contaminations might not agree with different people and make them ill. The general rule of thumb is that pathogens do not survive in beer, hence why you can'...


12

Star-San kills yeast. Star-san doesn't discriminate across different microbes. Despite that yeast can survive a pH2 solution, the pH is not the killing action of StarSan, its the redox reaction on the cell membranes of microbes that does the killing. The low pH is just what indicates that StarSan is active, not how it kills. Keep in mind too that ...


11

"You can't sanitize a turd" - George Fix If you can see it, feel it or smell it, you can't sanitize it. A little oil from old yeast or a plug of old hop trub wedged into a seam will never get sanitary from contact with a sanitizer. So clean first, then sanitize. Sure, a clean glass carboy looks pretty clean and will probably sanitize well, but how clean ...


10

I'd put my money on the wooden spoon. Legend is that in days of yore, brewers used to stir the wort with a "magic stick". If they didn't, it wouldn't ferment. The reason was the yeast imbedded in the wood. I've always been told not to use wooden spoons post boil. That makes sense to me.


9

Just before you add yeast. Your wort will not be heated again Wort is full of nutrients, fullest it was or will be Temperature is optimal for microbiological growth No competition with other microbes No alcohol yet Everything that has contact with wort before yeast kick in are most crucial. For full bodied, weak beers and ales, bottling is in my ...


8

White Film on Beer in Carboy Symptoms White film or flakes on top of beer is fairly common. It often happens in secondary, or in primary after the krausen falls. Don't worry - your beer is probably fine! Causes Usually, this is the result of yeast colonies being carried to the top of the beer from the trub or yeast cake by CO2, although in some cases, ...


8

The risk of infection is much lower after primary fermentation is complete, since there is alcohol present. The alcohol will prevent or retard the growth of bacteria and rogue yeasts. So, you should be safe to just add your adjuncts. With some fruits (strawberries especially), I have noticed that the beer seems to spoil after a month or so, presumably ...


8

Slow down a second, DWRHAH. What makes you think this batch is contaminted("infected")? Vigorous fermentation is usually just a sign of good yeast health. Most of my batches of beer are done with the bulk of fermentation 24-48 hours after pitching. Honey, unlike malt, is mostly monosaccharides, and is actually easier for yeast to ferment, thus would progress ...


8

The best way to get the turkey baster out with the least consequences on your wort is to wait until the beer is finished fermenting, and then just dump it out after the beer has been racked away. Whatever contamination was going to happen has already happened (hopefully you sanitized the turkey baster). Trying to fish out the turkey baster is going to be ...


7

I can think of a couple of ways: Pull a sample and look at it under a microscope. Bacteria and yeast cells look quite different from each other. After you get an idea of what they look like, you can look around online for pictures of various souring organisms (acetobacter, lactobacillus, brettanomyces, enterobacter, pediococcus, etc.). That would get ...


7

I've done intentional Brett brewing, and also have a friend who has a very persistent strain of Brett somewhere in her brewhouse that is popping up in all her beers. When young, Brett can taste kind of fruity (but not like normal ale yeast fruitiness) and starts to develop of flavor that kind of reminds me of vomit, but its not as bad as it sounds. Just kind ...


7

Beer is quite a harsh environment for bacterial contaminants. It's quite acidic pH <= 4.5, and of course alcoholic. So you have to dump a lot of bacteria in there to make a difference at this stage. A clean bottling wand with smooth sides harbours little bacteria. For peace of mind next time, you can sanitize the whole wand - just turn the wand around ...


6

I can immediately think of three indicators. Off flavours or strange aromas Beer that ferments vigorously for longer than expected Moulds or other growth on the wort. 2 and 3 can sometimes be normal, depending on conditions (temperature etc.) and the gravity and fermentability of your wort. Occasionally yeast might cause odd-looking growth on the beer. ...


6

Don't worry about sterilizing the hops. If you practice good sanitation you shouldn't get an infection. I've dry hopped several beers with pellet hops strait out of the pouch and have never had an infection as a result. A lot of new brewers worry about contaminating their beers. The truth is it is pretty hard to get a contamination, you almost have to try ...


6

My understanding is that explosions are usually caused by the airlock getting clogged, usually by krausen. The pressure builds up and you get an explosion. The solution is to use a blow-off hose instead of an airlock, since it's wider and allows for krausen or whatever to escape. On one hand, I haven't heard of this happening in secondary, but on the ...


6

I have an alepale with a spigot. I don't think I get infections from it but I'm a clean-freak. I always take apart the spigot and soak it in 5-star. They are a lot easier to use vs starting a siphon.


6

Basically the process of fermentation is what prevents undesirable organisms from taking hold and multiplying in your primary fermenter. As the yeast reproduce they in effect take over the environment and dominate any undesirable organisms present. The production of CO2 also drives the impurities to the top where it creates a blanket over the beer which ...


6

How do you cover the 5L mason jar? Does it have any sort of airlock, and is there a means of preventing bacteria and/or fruit flies out of the jar? I ask because fruit flies carry acetobacter (they're also known as vinegar flies), and acetobacter turns alcohol into vinegar in the presence of oxygen. So if your mead was exposed to air and a fruit fly got ...


6

I don't think you have to worry about being harmed by the beer, but you probably should worry about the flavor. If there's mold on top, I'd toss it.


6

This is normal. It's krausen - bits of yeast, hop particles and oils, trub and proteins floating on top of the beer - and a sign of healthy fermentation. Fermentation, How to brew, J. Palmer


6

Oh, if only you were 28, then I'd all be fine. Just kidding. I'd be surprised if this accident noticeably affects the beer, regardless of your age or state of health. Beer is a pretty unpleasant place for most bacteria, and that combined with the yeast activity in the bottle that scavenges any available oxygen, and the bacteriostatic nature of the beta ...


6

As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time. You should not worry as you are not setting it down for it to pick up bacterial contamination. Yes there is a tiny ...


6

QUICK TIP: Did you check with a hydrometer before you pitched? The golden rule with determining fermentation is "Trust your hydrometer; Almost everything else will lie to you" - Bubbling airlock and foam on the top of the wort can all have other causes, while a drop in specific gravity is only caused by conversion of the sugars in the wort to alcohol. ...


6

I have had something similar, I was brewing a Bohemian Pilsner Ale and the yeast formed tennis ball sized clumps on the top of the beer! I freaked out! But I recited the Papazian mantra and kegged the beer. That beer ended up being one my best beers ever. Some yeasts (S04 in my case) sometimes flocculate, but in the process still have so much CO2 that they ...


6

Your beer will probably be fine. Yes, your arm probably left some bacteria in the wort, but the wort is also picking up a few bacteria from the air. Cooled wort has some bacteria and/or wild yeast. But if those numbers are few compared to the number of yeast cells, then the yeast will start eating, creating an environment less friendly to bacteria. The ...


5

Yeah bro, it looks like lactobacillus, it's a little yellow though so maybe it mold. Lacto usually looks white. I have some lacto going on right now, let me get a picture for you. Did you boil the chips first to sanitizes them, although the whiskey should have done the trick? It's probably a little sour now, or a lot who knows until you taste it. I'd ...


5

The general rule is as long as a beer doesn't smell or taste off, it's probably okay to drink. It sounds to me like you have a Lactobacillus infection. Lacto will give the beer a sour taste and that taste will increase over time. That's the white film and flecks. It matches every description I've heard of for a lacto infection. Hopefully others will ...


5

Yeah I don't see much way around it for the batch size. I have always just used a 5 gallon better bottle for my secondary ferm and just took the cap off and used a wine-thief that was sanitized. Never had a problem. Personally I don't pour the beer back into the batch when done - I tend to taste it so maybe that helps. I then just siphon the beer into a ...


5

Not only is there alcohol that will stave off some of the nasties like other responses have mentioned. But hops themselves have antibiotic properties which help your yeast get an edge over the bugs. As far as fruit type adjuncts, if you want to play it safe, you don't actually have to boil them. Just put them in a pot and raise them to 160F for ten ...



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