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9

Star-San kills yeast. Star-san doesn't discriminate across different microbes. Despite that yeast can survive a pH2 solution, the pH is not the killing action of StarSan, its the redox reaction on the cell membranes of microbes that does the killing. The low pH is just what indicates that StarSan is active, not how it kills. Keep in mind too that ...


8

The risk of infection is much lower after primary fermentation is complete, since there is alcohol present. The alcohol will prevent or retard the growth of bacteria and rogue yeasts. So, you should be safe to just add your adjuncts. With some fruits (strawberries especially), I have noticed that the beer seems to spoil after a month or so, presumably ...


7

Beer is quite a harsh environment for bacterial contaminants. It's quite acidic pH <= 4.5, and of course alcoholic. So you have to dump a lot of bacteria in there to make a difference at this stage. A clean bottling wand with smooth sides harbours little bacteria. For peace of mind next time, you can sanitize the whole wand - just turn the wand around ...


6

My understanding is that explosions are usually caused by the airlock getting clogged, usually by krausen. The pressure builds up and you get an explosion. The solution is to use a blow-off hose instead of an airlock, since it's wider and allows for krausen or whatever to escape. On one hand, I haven't heard of this happening in secondary, but on the ...


6

Don't worry about sterilizing the hops. If you practice good sanitation you shouldn't get an infection. I've dry hopped several beers with pellet hops strait out of the pouch and have never had an infection as a result. A lot of new brewers worry about contaminating their beers. The truth is it is pretty hard to get a contamination, you almost have to try ...


6

I have an alepale with a spigot. I don't think I get infections from it but I'm a clean-freak. I always take apart the spigot and soak it in 5-star. They are a lot easier to use vs starting a siphon.


6

I don't think you have to worry about being harmed by the beer, but you probably should worry about the flavor. If there's mold on top, I'd toss it.


6

Basically the process of fermentation is what prevents undesirable organisms from taking hold and multiplying in your primary fermenter. As the yeast reproduce they in effect take over the environment and dominate any undesirable organisms present. The production of CO2 also drives the impurities to the top where it creates a blanket over the beer which ...


6

This is normal. It's krausen - bits of yeast, hop particles and oils, trub and proteins floating on top of the beer - and a sign of healthy fermentation. Fermentation, How to brew, J. Palmer


5

The general rule is as long as a beer doesn't smell or taste off, it's probably okay to drink. It sounds to me like you have a Lactobacillus infection. Lacto will give the beer a sour taste and that taste will increase over time. That's the white film and flecks. It matches every description I've heard of for a lacto infection. Hopefully others will ...


5

Yeah bro, it looks like lactobacillus, it's a little yellow though so maybe it mold. Lacto usually looks white. I have some lacto going on right now, let me get a picture for you. Did you boil the chips first to sanitizes them, although the whiskey should have done the trick? It's probably a little sour now, or a lot who knows until you taste it. I'd ...


5

The fermented beer is resilient to infections because it has several percent of alcohol inhibiting the bacterias from reproducing. Don't sweat it, you'll be fine. I never had any problems with dry hopping. I even put fresh fruit and peppers (unboiled) and it was still fine.


5

I've done intentional Brett brewing, and also have a friend who has a very persistent strain of Brett somewhere in her brewhouse that is popping up in all her beers. When young, Brett can taste kind of fruity (but not like normal ale yeast fruitiness) and starts to develop of flavor that kind of reminds me of vomit, but its not as bad as it sounds. Just kind ...


5

Looks OK to me. What you're seeing is a combination of CO2 coming out of solution, hop trub, and coagulated proteins. Relax, don't worry, have a homebrew.


4

Not only is there alcohol that will stave off some of the nasties like other responses have mentioned. But hops themselves have antibiotic properties which help your yeast get an edge over the bugs. As far as fruit type adjuncts, if you want to play it safe, you don't actually have to boil them. Just put them in a pot and raise them to 160F for ten ...


4

Yeah I don't see much way around it for the batch size. I have always just used a 5 gallon better bottle for my secondary ferm and just took the cap off and used a wine-thief that was sanitized. Never had a problem. Personally I don't pour the beer back into the batch when done - I tend to taste it so maybe that helps. I then just siphon the beer into a ...


4

Most likely not. Don't worry about it. Sanitized marbles or stainless steel weights can be used to weigh down a dry-hop bag. Or, don't worry about it too much.


4

While some claim that the addition of hops to their beer have contributed to contamination, it is quite rare considering how hops are anti-microbial in nature. While not having any way of confirming it, I would suspect contamination on those situations occurred due to some other unsanitary practice (didn't sanitize the bag, weights, or it was already ...


3

Every batch of homebrew is contaminated. You can't hope to have zero airborne contaminants in your wort especially with it just sitting there mostly open during the chill process. (depending on how you chill). That said brewers yeast loves wort. Brewers yeast starts to create an undesirable environment for wild yeasts and bacteria. Primarily through ...


3

Yep. Seal it up with some plastic wrap and a rubber band. Or, better, in air-tight tupperware and keep it in the refrigerator. Limit exposure to oxygen and you should be okay. Taste it before using again to check if it's stale or off.


3

iodophor has a shelf life reportedly of 5 years, as describved in this article, which in addition provides a lot of information for the new iodophor user. No rinse really means just that. Just turn the bottles upside down and let them run dry. A few drops left in the bottle will do no harm, and have no detectable taste. Again, the same article above ...


3

The bubble clusters are normal, not to worry :) An infection typically looks like there's big chunks of stuff floating on top. Another thing that tends to worry first-timers but is actually normal is the crown of nasty-looking stuff around the top of the beer, that's just the yeast and sometimes sediment depending on if/how you filtered the beer (hops are a ...


3

There's no risk of microbial contamination from anything you add before or during the boil. The act of boiling itself will sufficiently purify the water. Water that you add at the end of the boil is a slightly different story. For the majority of people in the majority of circumstances, adding clean and unboiled water is no problem so long as it has been ...


2

I use a better bottle for my secondary and bought myself a wine thief. It can be sanitized and quickly dipped into the secondary for a test. Sure, it opens up air getting in, I'm not so much worried about that with small 5 gallon batches, but if I were doing larger batches then I'd want to have another method to extract samples without adding in more air.


2

I have a spigot on one of my better bottles and it is convenient, but only if you have a full set of accessories to go along with it. The whole point of their stuff is closed transfers. I think it's ok as long as you are aware of the potential issues and are vigilant about cleaning. As far as getting hydro samples, a sanitized turkey baster works as does ...


2

I am still somewhat of a beginner/intermediate, but life seemed to get so much better when I started using a pail with a spigot.


2

I don't have any buckets or better bottles with spigots. I just use the auto-siphon to rack from primary to secondary and then from secondary to bottling bucket. I also bottle with an auto-siphon. Mind you, I do five gallon batches. Were I to do larger batches I would invest in equipment with either a conical bottom or a spigot system. For gravity ...


2

Sometimes the problem is not with the microorganisms themselves, which will be destroyed by heating, but with the toxins they produce, which won't be; salmonella works this way, for instance. We try to pitch large, healthy populations of yeast so they out compete undesirable microorganisms for the sugars. If it's already moldy, I think you've lost that ...


2

So, I had a 1600ml starter for my lager and it took off aggressively. I had to put a blow-off tube on my flask. I let the tube drop into about 3 inches of star-San. When the starter was all done, I had a good quarter inch of yeasties in the star-San. I have read all over these forums that that yeast would be useless. It was soaking in the star-San for 3 ...



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