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7

The cone shape and valve on the bottom lets you remove the trub without transferring containers, so you can do your primary and secondary ferment in the same vessel, or bottle without worrying about the trub. The bottom valve also makes it easy to remove your beer for bottling and such, so there's no need for siphoning. I think this is mainly advantageous ...


4

I saw this post and I immediately thought of medical cameras. Any kind of endoscope will be all the things you need: compact, flexible, easy to sanitize, and self-illuminating. A typical endoscope will have a camera on the end of a cable and be not much bigger than the cable itself. Purchased new, these things are very expensive, but if you watch the auction ...


3

I have a conical that a welder friend made me and I love it. The only problem is that it's not temperature controlled and it's too big. I can't fit it in my fermentation chamber and I have to brew 12 gallons to come close to filling it. If you have the money, get one. Someday I hope to have a fleet of them.


3

Check out shipping on those tanks. I looked into placing an order of five of their 35-gallon tanks and it would cost $450 to freight them to me. Don't forget (or "have you heard") about Mini-Brew plastic conicals. They're a little more expensive, but you get a racking port and a side port for temperature probe. I found mine on eBay for about half the ...


2

typically i dump the trub just as the fermentation is winding down...about 4 days in. This cleans out all of the garbage. If I had a hard time removing trub before the conical, I will do a quick dump about 30 minutes after filling the conical. To avoid oxygen exposure during a dump, I attach a balloon to the conical using a stopper and a short piece of tube, ...


1

You could probably build some sort of enclosure for the camera out of clear plexiglass or something similar. Use a rubber grommet to get the cable through the wall of the plexiglass enclosure so it's water tight. You could then maybe run the cable through your blowoff if it's long enough (or just get a wireless camera!). something like that is probably ...


1

Just like any fermentation process the best practice is to leave the beer on the yeast cake until it is completely done fermenting. And not just actively fermenting. Resting on the primary cake after terminal gravity has been reached for a few days goes a long way towards getting cleaner tasting beer. I'd say do not dump until at least 10-14 days post ...


1

If you're brewing an ale, I don't think there's any disadvantage to dumping the whole trub. If you were planning to pitch another batch onto it just drain it into a sanitary container. The trub is just inactive yeast and proteins. You'll most likely still have yeast floating around, and draining the trub will probably stir some inactive yeast back up into ...


1

Those would be perfect, one of the biggest home brew shops in the UK sells a range of plastic conical fermenters like these. As stated the risk would be in getting a scratch and thus an infection. But if you are careful with it you should get 2-3 years out of it. For $55 I think its a no-brainer.



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