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13

Cold Crashing Why It's Done To allow yeast and other matter to settle out To improve flavor To precipitate chill haze To help prevent oxidation When It's Done After fermentation has finished Usually also after diacetyl rest If you crash the beer too early, the yeast will become inactive (below 40°F) and won't reabsorb fermentation byproducts like ...


13

I wouldn't bother, but if you do, don't shake them hard, because it will denature some of the foam-producing proteins, and has a chance of reducing head retention. Be lazy and let it do its thing.


10

I think the biggest problem with one person drinking from a growler of beer (even if you want to drink the three pints yourself) is the pour and repour. Your surface area issues and estimations in releation to a normal 12 or 22oz bottle are good. However, if you poured three 4oz samples from a 12 oz bottle you'd be stirring up the yeast just as often. To ...


9

Corn syrup Regular olde sucrose Malt extract Brown sugar if you're desperate See A Primer on Priming and How to Brew.


8

First of all, there is no rule about time for beers. The beer makes its own schedule. In terms of aging, there are no rules either. The beer is ready when it tastes ready to you. I prefer IPAs without a lot of age on them so that the hop character remains fresh. But you should try one occasionally and see what you think.


7

You'll want to keep the bottles within the yeast's active temperature for the first week or so after bottling in order to keep the yeast active for carbonation. Most likely, that means room temperature. After that, you can chill the beer for drinking or to extend the lifetime (not that there's any rush, we're talking on the order of months). Definitely keep ...


6

Cold crashing is a technique to get the yeast to flocculate (settle to the bottom of the fermenter). This is generally done to get clearer beer (or wine). It should be done when fermentation is complete, since there will be very little (if any) fermentation activity afterwards. This is because you are effectively removing most of the yeast from the beer. ...


6

I'd be cautious of using corn syrup, it usually has salt and sometimes vanilla flavoring in it in addition to the actual corn sugar syrup. Go with regular table sugar (sucrose), or malt extract if you have some to spare. KOTMF has got a handy calculator to help you determine how much you should use: http://kotmf.com/tools/prime.php


6

It makes absolutely no difference in the quality of the beer which way you do it. I'd tend to do it in the keg for the reasons you mention. You can carb it and have it ready to serve when it's done conditioning.


6

Here are some things I've learned over the two or three years of bottling: Use a checklist for the whole day, (clean, sanitize bottles, sanitize caps, prime, etc...) Double check the amount of sugar you're using to prime If available, use a workbench so you can stand comfortably Ensure your beer is high enough above your workspace so it siphons nicely Have ...


5

It's hard to say since growlers can be made very strongly and more thinly for just carrying final product from a keg to several thirsty mouths. Most growlers with straight sides are not designed to hold the pressure of natural carbonation - especially if they have suffered some wear and shocks over time. I've had one explode on me with just beer in it, and ...


5

Well, Chemipro Oxi I would not consider a sanitizer...cleaner, sure, but it is essentially sodium percarbonate - it technically CAN be used to sanitize, but the amount needed makes it pretty uneconomical. Betadine, on the other hand, can be used for years...bottles may have an expiration date (typically required on medical-type solutions), but it can be ...


5

If you have them available, I like to bottle 2-3 into the plastic P.E.T. bottles. That way you can just give them a squeeze after a week or so to see if they have carbonated fully. Not a necessary step, but it will save you from opening un-carbed bottles down the road.


5

There's no reason you can't ferment a 2.5 gal. batch in a 5 gal. gal. carboy, at least through 3-4 weeks of primary fermentation.


5

You will need to add priming sugar if the beer has reached its terminal gravity with the yeast being used. In this example, despite the 80% attenuation the remaining 20% is not usually fermentable sugars. Its comprised of protein, dextrans and other molecules in solution that are largely ignored by your primary yeast strain. Lastly, reported attenuation ...


5

There are two ways to get carbonated beer in bottles: natural conditioning, and force carbonation. Natural conditioning is a process in which a small amount of fermentable sugar is added to the beer at bottling time. The yeast in the beer will ferment the sugar, adding carbon dioxide and a small amount of alcohol. Because the yeast become active to produce ...


4

If by bottle condition you mean to carbonate, I'd add some fresh yeast. Preferably a neutral ale yeast strain like WLP001. I'd recommend using just a 1/3rd to 1/2 a vial of WLP001. Add it to your bottling bucket along with your priming sugar prior to racking over from fermentor to bucket. This should ensure more than enough healthy yeast at bottling.


4

I tried krausening several times before giving up on it. It's much more inexact than sugar, since the fermentability of the wort you prime with is inexact. It takes longer for the beer to carbonate. And there is no advantage to the flavor of the beer. I went back to using sugar since it was much more exact and predictable. The one place krausening can ...


4

I froze a keg of Hefeweizen totally stiff. I had accidentally pulled the temp control probe out of the deep freezer that the kegs were in. The freezer ran at its "normal" freezing temps for maybe 2 days before I noticed it, so the keg was TOTALLY frozen as far as I could tell. Good news: the beer was still delicious! I had decent head on the hefe, and its ...


4

Time is one factor and strength is another. For average strength (up to maybe 1.070) beers, 2-3 months is no problem. For beer over that very much, I'd add yeast at maybe 3 months of age.


4

I believe Little Creatures filter and re-inoculate with a lager strain - keeping the total yeast count very low will help in minimising the sediment. I'm not sure how easy it would be to do at home - assuming you can filter, you'd need to accurately measure an exact quantity of very healthy yeast. You'd probably need to use trial and error and be prepared ...


4

It's very unlikely you will need to repitch. even with cold conditioning, if you looked at the beer under a microscope you'd find there's still a lot of yeast in suspension. I've lagered beers for months and still had enough yeast left for carbonation.


4

I would leave it in the keg - there's little to gain from racking, and you risk contaminating or oxidizing the beer. An Ale yeast has a hard time conditioning at fridge temps, but the beer will condition in the keg if you take it out the fridge and leave it for 10-14 days at room temp, around 64-70F/17-20C. You don't have to bleed off the CO2. Once the ...


4

I take it from the title that you added the priming sugar and bottled the beer, then put it in the fridge? If that's the case, you'll probably be OK. Just let the beer come up to room temperature and leave them alone for two weeks. Open one and see if it's carbonated. If it is, job well done. Relax and drink your beer. Otherwise, the yeast was knocked back ...


3

You need to prime all your beers that you plan to carbonate in the bottle. An alternative to this would be to bottle prior to the ferment finishing and let the residual activity carbonate the beer. This technique is not advisable for the math challenged and novice brewer. It requires careful attention to the fermentation and a lot of experience with the ...


3

Yep. Seal it up with some plastic wrap and a rubber band. Or, better, in air-tight tupperware and keep it in the refrigerator. Limit exposure to oxygen and you should be okay. Taste it before using again to check if it's stale or off.


3

In general there is no reason to do this as it just prolongs the settling out of all the yeast. If you had good yeast health going into the bottling phase all should be fine. I don't like to intervene with the process any more than necessary, unless something out of the ordinary occurs. If your bottles don't carb up, or they seem inconsistantly ...


3

Traditional German brewers would use a krausen from an actively fermenting batch to carbonate and this would also reabsorb the diacetyl. You can do the same thing by priming and pitching a pack of yeast and the secondary fermentation should do the trick. A diacetyl rest at this point will not effective since there is very little active yeast in the beer ...


3

just store it under the same conditions you fermented it in


3

If you have green and clear glass, then you should cover them, yes. Otherwise, if they're brown glass in a fairly dark room, I wouldn't worry about it. If you really want to do an experiment with brown vs. green and clear bottles, then you probably do want to expose them to some light, since presumably that would be the point of the experiment. Not quite ...



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