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13

Cold Crashing Why It's Done To allow yeast and other matter to settle out To improve flavor To precipitate chill haze To help prevent oxidation When It's Done After fermentation has finished Usually also after diacetyl rest If you crash the beer too early, the yeast will become inactive (below 40°F) and won't reabsorb fermentation byproducts like ...


10

I think the biggest problem with one person drinking from a growler of beer (even if you want to drink the three pints yourself) is the pour and repour. Your surface area issues and estimations in releation to a normal 12 or 22oz bottle are good. However, if you poured three 4oz samples from a 12 oz bottle you'd be stirring up the yeast just as often. To ...


8

First of all, there is no rule about time for beers. The beer makes its own schedule. In terms of aging, there are no rules either. The beer is ready when it tastes ready to you. I prefer IPAs without a lot of age on them so that the hop character remains fresh. But you should try one occasionally and see what you think.


7

You'll want to keep the bottles within the yeast's active temperature for the first week or so after bottling in order to keep the yeast active for carbonation. Most likely, that means room temperature. After that, you can chill the beer for drinking or to extend the lifetime (not that there's any rush, we're talking on the order of months). Definitely keep ...


6

I'd be cautious of using corn syrup, it usually has salt and sometimes vanilla flavoring in it in addition to the actual corn sugar syrup. Go with regular table sugar (sucrose), or malt extract if you have some to spare. KOTMF has got a handy calculator to help you determine how much you should use: http://kotmf.com/tools/prime.php


6

Cold crashing is a technique to get the yeast to flocculate (settle to the bottom of the fermenter). This is generally done to get clearer beer (or wine). It should be done when fermentation is complete, since there will be very little (if any) fermentation activity afterwards. This is because you are effectively removing most of the yeast from the beer. ...


6

Here are some things I've learned over the two or three years of bottling: Use a checklist for the whole day, (clean, sanitize bottles, sanitize caps, prime, etc...) Double check the amount of sugar you're using to prime If available, use a workbench so you can stand comfortably Ensure your beer is high enough above your workspace so it siphons nicely Have ...


5

Well, Chemipro Oxi I would not consider a sanitizer...cleaner, sure, but it is essentially sodium percarbonate - it technically CAN be used to sanitize, but the amount needed makes it pretty uneconomical. Betadine, on the other hand, can be used for years...bottles may have an expiration date (typically required on medical-type solutions), but it can be ...


5

It's hard to say since growlers can be made very strongly and more thinly for just carrying final product from a keg to several thirsty mouths. Most growlers with straight sides are not designed to hold the pressure of natural carbonation - especially if they have suffered some wear and shocks over time. I've had one explode on me with just beer in it, and ...


5

You will need to add priming sugar if the beer has reached its terminal gravity with the yeast being used. In this example, despite the 80% attenuation the remaining 20% is not usually fermentable sugars. Its comprised of protein, dextrans and other molecules in solution that are largely ignored by your primary yeast strain. Lastly, reported attenuation ...


4

I froze a keg of Hefeweizen totally stiff. I had accidentally pulled the temp control probe out of the deep freezer that the kegs were in. The freezer ran at its "normal" freezing temps for maybe 2 days before I noticed it, so the keg was TOTALLY frozen as far as I could tell. Good news: the beer was still delicious! I had decent head on the hefe, and its ...


4

If by bottle condition you mean to carbonate, I'd add some fresh yeast. Preferably a neutral ale yeast strain like WLP001. I'd recommend using just a 1/3rd to 1/2 a vial of WLP001. Add it to your bottling bucket along with your priming sugar prior to racking over from fermentor to bucket. This should ensure more than enough healthy yeast at bottling.


4

I tried krausening several times before giving up on it. It's much more inexact than sugar, since the fermentability of the wort you prime with is inexact. It takes longer for the beer to carbonate. And there is no advantage to the flavor of the beer. I went back to using sugar since it was much more exact and predictable. The one place krausening can ...


4

I believe Little Creatures filter and re-inoculate with a lager strain - keeping the total yeast count very low will help in minimising the sediment. I'm not sure how easy it would be to do at home - assuming you can filter, you'd need to accurately measure an exact quantity of very healthy yeast. You'd probably need to use trial and error and be prepared ...


4

I would leave it in the keg - there's little to gain from racking, and you risk contaminating or oxidizing the beer. An Ale yeast has a hard time conditioning at fridge temps, but the beer will condition in the keg if you take it out the fridge and leave it for 10-14 days at room temp, around 64-70F/17-20C. You don't have to bleed off the CO2. Once the ...


3

Traditional German brewers would use a krausen from an actively fermenting batch to carbonate and this would also reabsorb the diacetyl. You can do the same thing by priming and pitching a pack of yeast and the secondary fermentation should do the trick. A diacetyl rest at this point will not effective since there is very little active yeast in the beer ...


3

In general there is no reason to do this as it just prolongs the settling out of all the yeast. If you had good yeast health going into the bottling phase all should be fine. I don't like to intervene with the process any more than necessary, unless something out of the ordinary occurs. If your bottles don't carb up, or they seem inconsistantly ...


3

You need to prime all your beers that you plan to carbonate in the bottle. An alternative to this would be to bottle prior to the ferment finishing and let the residual activity carbonate the beer. This technique is not advisable for the math challenged and novice brewer. It requires careful attention to the fermentation and a lot of experience with the ...


3

If you have green and clear glass, then you should cover them, yes. Otherwise, if they're brown glass in a fairly dark room, I wouldn't worry about it. If you really want to do an experiment with brown vs. green and clear bottles, then you probably do want to expose them to some light, since presumably that would be the point of the experiment. Not quite ...


3

I don't see any way to bottle condition without having some sediment in the bottle. The sediment is the flocculated yeast that consumed the priming sugar to create the carbonation. Without viable yeast in the bottle there is no way to produce the carbonation. The definition of bottle conditioning used by your favorite brewery may be slightly different ...


3

A 3 Gallon Carboy is $20 USD i think. I would much rather let my beer condition the proper length of time then be dissatisfied with the end product. After all about $20ish worth of materials probably went into the beer no? As to bottle conditioning vs secondary conditioning. While yes you can simply condition in the bottles you will be waiting longer and ...


3

You may or may not need extra time, but my experience is that it never hurts to give the beer more time. 4-5 weeks will be fine. The best thing to do would be to start taking gravity readings after 3-4 weeks and taste the sample. Between the gravity and the taste, you should be able to tell when it's done.


2

Old school method is to kräusen it. You would add a portion of actively fermenting beer to your priming bucket. You can also do this with plain wort, but the fresh and healthy yeast in actively fermenting beer has a few benefits... clean up diacetyl, acetylaldehyde, and other fermentation by-products. Here's a calculator for how much gyle to add: priming ...


2

How long and how solid were they frozen? They couldn't have been all that frozen or the kegs would have deformed/ruptured. Have you tried any of the beer? It's probably just fine. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but off flavors associated with autolysis come from the living yeast munching on the dead ones. They'll all be dormant from the cold anyway, ...


2

The question is a little ambiguous because the term conditioning is used to mean two different things. Conditioning in the bottle is sometimes refered to as the process of naturally carbonating the beer. (adding a little sugar back to the finished beer prior to packaging for the yeast to use in the generation of carbonation), trapped in the sealed ...


2

The mid-50's to low 60's is about what you'd want to bottle condition an ale. Lower temps could cause the remaining yeast to go dormant and not carbonate the beer adequately. As far as storage goes, it depends on the style in most cases. IPA's need to be treated like deli meat--you want to drink it fresh or the hop character will start to fade. Higher ...


2

I would recommend against carbonating in growler. The thin walls are not designed for high pressure. If your beer didn't finish completely, you have an infection, or you accidentally use too much priming sugar that thing is going to explode. And it may wait to explode until you pick it up, shooting glass in your arm, face, and dropping glass on your foot. ...


2

Leaving it in the secondary will allow more sediment to settle out of the beer, but eventually this isn't going to matter too much. After a while your returns will diminish indefinitely, and with a stout I wouldn't worry about it as it isn't supposed to be a nice clear beer. If you wait a long time, like a matter months then the yeast will lose vitallity ...


2

The one tip I can add is to write out each step in point form so nothing is missed. I have a white board in my brewing room and for each batch, I write out each step and a note or 2 on each (IE a target gravity read). This way I hopefully will leave no Leaf unturned or step missed along the way. I am new to this and write notes for each step too so I have ...


2

That pretty much sums it up. Just make sure you add the priming sugar. Sometimes in your excitement to get the beer bottled you can forget this step. If you do happen to forget the priming sugar you can always get coopers carbonation tabs. Instead of combining all the beer to a bucket and priming you can just pop the cap, add a tab and recap. Store them the ...



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