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3

As far as my intuition goes, the color is just as I would expect. Might be a bit more red, but within my expectations all right. You used not-so-pale pale malts, and a bit of amber, so you couldn't have brown nor yellow. And addition of floor-malted malt might have caused more brownish and less reddish tint to your wort. For clarity, it's also not ...


3

In first place it's very hard to get a blood-red beer. The beers that are said to be red are actually ruby, copper or reddish brown in color. Just to make it clear because you are probably aware of that. My favorite malt for red color is Roasted Barley (in very small amounts - maximum 2% of your grist). Munich is probably one of the best too, and Vienna ...


2

All those answers above used to be the way to go. Since then, Best Malz has introduced Red X malt. It gives you the reddest color I've ever seen, especially if you use it as 100% of your grist.


2

To expand on my comment above: For most homebrewers, unless you're willing to drop some serious money on lab equipment, your measurements will be mostly limited to weights, volumes and specific gravity (and pressure, if kegging). Most of the numbers you'll be dealing with outside these things will involve calculations based on a best-fit equations for most ...


2

The volume to use is the final volume you are aiming for in the fermenter; yes the post boil volume. Lovibond -> SRM °L = (SRM + 0.76) ÷ 1.3546


2

I made a purple beer using purple corn. Try between 7 to 10 ears of corn per 5 gallon brew.


1

Red X malt may give you that red color you're looking for, but it is way too malty,IMO. I've tried it in multiple quantities, from the whole base malt, to a few pounds of the grist, to a few ounces in the grain bill. Never been satisfied with the results. Personally I'd rather take my chances elsewhere



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