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7

First, a little history. Joseph Lovibond developed the Lovibond Scale in the 1860's, as a means of implementing quality control into beer production. The Lovibond Scale works by having the user visually compare the shade of a substance to the nearest shade of colored disks. Thus, determination of a color on the Lovibond Scale is a human estimation, rather ...


7

Most recipes are formulated for full wort, full gravity boils. Reserving extract would increase your hop utilization and the beer would be slightly, but probably not noticeably, lighter. Make your own decision about the benefits.


7

First of all, in order to think that melanoidin is a sub for decoction you have to believe that decoction has an impact on flavor. My own experiments, as well as those of others, do not support that. Melanoidin will boost the maltiness of the beer in a kind of sweet, fruity manner, as well as have an impact on flavor as you describe. Too much of it will ...


6

If you are doing partial boils, you are probably getting significant wort darkening and lower hop utilization from the high gravity boil. Extract tends to come out darker regardless, but this can be mitigated somewhat by waiting until the end of your boil to add the majority of your extract. Since your target OG may be something like 1.050, when you're ...


6

Cloudiness in Beer Cloudiness in beer has several main causes. For some styles of beer, such as a witbier, it is desirable, and for others, it is regarded as a flaw. It is, therefore, important to understand what factors influence clarity and cloudiness of beer so that you can control the appearance of your beer as best possible. 1. Suspended Proteins ...


6

Despite the Wikipedia page for Maillard Reactions currently saying that Maillard Reactions require low moisture, alkaline conditions, and temperatures well above the boiling point of water, Maillard reactions can happen outside of those conditions. For instance, tanning lotions utilize a Maillard reaction, and I'm fairly certain women wouldn't use them if ...


6

I've done two red ales so far. In the first I used a combination of Weyermann Carared (http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/brewing-ingredients/grain-malts/caramel-malts/weyermann-carared.html) and Simpsons Dark Crystal (http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/brewing-ingredients/grain-malts/caramel-malts/simpsons-dark-crystal.html) about half a pound of ...


6

Too soon. Don't sweat it. I bet it will lighten up as it ferments and yeast and trub drop.


5

I imagine it depends upon the type of coloring - some food coloring can also work in liquids - just try dropping a few drops in a glass of water. With beer, you may need a lot of coloring for it to influence the beer color significantly. Depending upon the beer style, you can also color with fruit juices, but of course these will have some affect on the ...


5

Fruit is not the best color agent here - the flavor will be out of character in an Irish Red. You get the red color from a little roast barley. Take a handful of lightly crushed roasted barley (or two handfulls of whole) and let them stand in half a pint of cold water for half an hour to an hour. Strain the water, which will now be black, boil, then add it ...


4

Ordinary water-based food coloring works fine. I once made a green beer for St Pats Day by brewing up a simple ale and then adding in yellow and blue food coloring after primary was over until it was green. I would stay away from food products initially, because some of them (like fruit) can influence the flavor as well. One thing to remember is that the ...


4

The definition of SRM scale is based on the absorption of light at a single wavelength, so it's only measuring one aspect of color. The way the SRM views color is similar to how things look when you put them behind a yellow filter. Beer color is of course more than one-dimensional - reds, oranges, even some green, but these are not taken into account ...


3

In general, darker malts have more concentrated flavor, since the darker compounds created in Maillard reactions and/or caramelization (pyrolysis) and carbonization at high temperatures have a stronger taste. However, although color is a significant indicator, it's only a one dimensional indicator, and doesn't capture all the details of flavor. For ...


3

I would go with some Sinamar. Its a product from Weyermann made entirely of Black Malt and will add color to the beer without any additional flavor. http://www.williamsbrewing.com/4-OZ-SINAMAR-NATURAL-BEER-COLORING-P2651.aspx Sinamar® natural beer coloring was patented by the Weyermann Company in Germany in 1902, and is a gluten free natural mashed ...


3

From what I understand, the formula is: ┬░L = (SRM + 0.6) / 1.35 However, for all values light enough to be visibly different to the human eye, L=SRM. They only start splitting when you get too dark to be visibly different without a spectrometer. More Discussion / Source


2

Dark malts will give you that color. The problem is that you have to be very careful or you'll add too much roast/chocolate/bitter grain flavor. 1.5 - 3% of the grainbill to start out with; two or three ounces in a 5 gallon batch. Try pale chocolate or dehusked/debittered roast barley . There's always food coloring too. Trivia: All beer is red. More ...


2

I have not used burnt caramel so I can not advise you on it. But if you are not trying to add any flavor, but only darken your beer, you should check out Sinamar Coloring Agent from Weyerman. 4 oz will raise your beer 16 SRM for five gallons so 4 SRM per ounce for BeerSmith. The Burnt Caramel will add flavor to your beer, if this is also what you were ...


2

if you are using brewing software a lot of them have the option of indicating that your extract is being used as a 'late kettle addition' and you can then set the time (i.e. 15m from flameout), by doing this the software should automatically adjust your SRM and IBU's.


2

The very first BrewStrong episode was all about melanoidins. Very useful.


2

Melanoidins are created by Maillard reactions, but melanoidins themsleves add only color, not flavor to beer. The Maillard reactions that create melaniodins are what cause the flavors. Wort does not caramelize in the kettle. Caramelization requires temps in excess of 360F and exposure to O2, neither of which happens in the kettle.


2

Five percent of your grain bill is generally a good starting point for Melanoidin Malt contribution. Be cautious using more, as Melanoidin Malt has a very powerful and distinct flavor. I think I've also seen a comparison somewhere on the internet between decoction mashing and Melanoidin Malt, so maybe Denny will weigh in on this one...


2

One or two ounces of roasted barley is what I use to get that red color. My basic red ale has a crystal 60 and 120 in it as well. But its really the roasted barley in combo with those that gets you there. EDIT: Here is a Red Ale recipe from Zymurgy magazine you can try. I don't know if you can get these ingredients or not however. 7lb Maris Otter Pale ...


2

They will not taste the same. Its like comparing pale chocolate (200L) to black patent (500+L). There are indeed a range of chocolate malts out there, especially of the English variety. You can use brewing software or a color calculator online to help match it up. If the recipe you want to brew also has SRM along with its supposed OG, FG etc etc, fill in ...


2

Its because the sparkloid pulls stuff in suspension out of suspension. Solids in suspension tend to make the wine (or beer) look lighter in color because it reflects more light back at you, as that stuff settles out the more light passes straight through and it appears darker. Nothing to worry about. To see this effect in action put a tsp of flour into a ...


2

Particulates are dropping out. When they are in suspension, they make the wort appear lighter. As they drop out, the beer takes on its normal color.


2

As Tobias nicely put, there isn't much you can do about the colour. Although, I would not think too much about it having "much more of an amber color than most double IPA's I have seen". Unless you distinctly are looking for a specific colour, I would bother thinking about it. When it comes to the aroma I would suggest that you review your hop schedule; ...


2

There's not much you can do about the colour, aside from pick a different kit. The colour is a result of the mix of grains used to make the extract. To get more hop aroma, you could try dry hopping with couple ounces of a nice aroma hop like Cascade. After fermentation has completed, add two ounces of hops to the beer. Some brewers like to put the hops in ...


2

I think you've got 2 problems here: 1) The first is that the hop aroma disappeared almost immediately after opening the bottle..... I let the wort cool in an ice bath, and it took about 2 hours to cool. These two things are connected. When you add the Cascade hops right at the very end of the boil, their purpose was to impart some nice, ...


2

You shouldn't scrub plastic - it will scratch it, which leaves small spaces for micro-organisms to grow, which are subsequently even harder to clean away. Instead, get a cleaner such as PBW or Oxiclean (I personally prefer PBW since it can be reused - Oxiclean loses potency once the oxygen has been released.) You can fill the pail with the made up PBW ...


1

If there is yeast in suspension, then filtering out the yeast will make the beer color appear darker. When you add yeast, (e.g. when making a starter) the color becomes progressively lighter - the yeast cells make the beer more reflective. When you remove the yeast cells, the beer becomes less reflective, and darker. The beer will also become clearer, ...



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