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6

It makes absolutely no difference in the quality of the beer which way you do it. I'd tend to do it in the keg for the reasons you mention. You can carb it and have it ready to serve when it's done conditioning.


4

Since my comment got upvotes, and since you put a bounty, and since nobody corrected me nor added more than I originally said, I'll re-submit my comment as an answer: This is what I've gathered from reading & podcasts... Hop flavor and aroma is lost primarily through the oxidative staling of polyphenols. Dr. Charlie Bamforth often posits that the rate ...


2

I think there are several reasons why cold crashing works, but they all come down to affecting various parts of the equation for drag (in other words, gravity is doing all of the work). First, cold promotes early flocculation of yeast. Yeast clump together and form flocs as a survival reaction to adverse environmental conditions, with cold being one of ...


2

At the simplest level, cold crashing is about reducing any exothermic heat from yeast metabolism, since this causes convection and interferes with the sedimentation. Cold crashing temperatures can (and should) be a good deal cooler than serving temps. Despite what is common practice, most, if not all beer, be served above ice-cold temperatures to properly ...


2

Cold slows reactions down. The reactions which degrade hop aroma would be slowed partially by colder temps. But as your question states, does it significantly slow the loss of aroma. I think its largely subjective nose to nose. Cold certainly slows it down, but significantly is hard to quantify.


1

Temperature at its core is a measurement of particle velocity. The colder something gets the slower the particles and atoms are moving. When you cold crash you are slowing down the nano-scopic movement of all these particles (macro and otherwise). The less they collide with each other and the slower the move, the more effective gravity is at pulling them ...


1

Cold Crashing clarifies cider by causing the yeast to clump together, or "flocculate." These clumps of yeast then fall out of suspension much faster than individual cells (due to some fluid dynamics that I won't pretend to understand). Flocculation depends on many factors, chief among them, yeast strain, but temperature plays a major factor. For the majority ...


1

Don't know really why you'd cold condition a Saison. If its to clarify it doesn't need to be that cold. Just put it at 50F and you'll get just as effective a flocculation. Then you still have plenty of yeast to carbonate. A better option would be to just bottle it, and store the bottles cold after they carb up. Stuff will settle out in the bottle, and ...


1

Partly it depends on the yeast. Westmalle (WLP 550, Wy 3787) is notorious for flocculating in the middle of a fermentation if it gets too cold, and thereafter being impossible to rouse. At that point, re-pitching is the only option. It can also very easily take off and get too hot--I've had 80F+ with it. Water bath is the best bet for that yeast. But it's ...


1

A drop in temp isn't going to hurt your yeast, but they may chose to start flocculating a little early. Keep an eye of the ferment after you get it warmed back up and see if it starts again. You may need to rouse the yeast (get them back in suspension) if the beer doesn't get started again. Also, don't make assumptions about what's going on via sight. ...


1

I'm no expert, but I've had a few brews that had temp fluctuations and although it took longer the taste was not noticeably affected. I could have just been lucky. I do think that the important aspect of fermentation is to get it going quickly. Getting a blanket of CO2 over the brew is really important in keeping out the nasties. So, as long as this is not ...



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