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8

If the sanitizer was StarSan, then you'll be fine. At the usual concentration of 1oz per 5 gallons, it's safe - even safe enough to drink. StarSan is phosphoric acid and surfactants - coke is also largely phosphoric acid and sugar, so the two are in someways similar. In a radio program, Charlie Talley, 5 star chemicals allegedly drank a glass of starsan, ...


6

I am going to say that you will have plenty of yeast remaining. It may take a little longer for the carbonation to happen, but it will happen. I have left beer in a cold primary for a month at a time before and still got proper carbonation within 2-3weeks post priming.


6

Well, wait another week. Sometimes it can be slow. Assuming that's not the problem, the first suggestion would be to gently swirl the bottles individually to try and rouse some yeast. Cold crashing shouldn't have knocked them all out of suspension. It may have taken some of them out, but there still should be plenty to carb. Swirl, wait a week, and open ...


4

It's very unlikely you will need to repitch. even with cold conditioning, if you looked at the beer under a microscope you'd find there's still a lot of yeast in suspension. I've lagered beers for months and still had enough yeast left for carbonation.


4

It does cold crash them, reducing activity to force them to flocculate and sediment out of solution. It does passivate them, generally shutting down their metabolism. It does not inactivate or destroy them, however; the yeast are still alive, just dormant. Bring them back up to pitching temperature and introduce them to fresh wort, and they will reproduce ...


4

What you're doing is lagering the beer, so it would have the same benefits it has for a lager beer. Beer deteriorates much more slowly at cold temperatures. The only possible problem I know of is that after that much time you might not have enough yeast left in suspension to carbonate the beer in the bottle. If that's what you intend to do, it'd be a good ...


3

Yes, you have it. Normally you cold crash at the end of fermentation, before bottling. And a word of warning...if it was still outgassing heavily when you bottled it, it's likely fermentation wasn't finished. Bottles could explode. Keep it in a box in a closet, or somewhere safe.


3

The presence of yeasty dust in the bottle and some carbonation leads me to believe you can expect these to carbonate normally. I have lagered beer at controlled temps for at least 5 months and gotten successful bottle conditioning. Issues holding yours back are likely the temp swings. Move the bottles to someplace closer to 70F and try and hold them ...


3

If you are pitching healthy yeast into an appropriately made wort there is never a concern of off flavors from yeast. ALWAYS wait till the yeast is done. Done being checking first for the expected terminal gravity, THEN by taste. IF you have reached FG and it still tastes like it needs more time to clean up diacetyl and the like, leave it a little longer. ...


3

The difference in volumes of dissolved CO2 at 55 v. 63 is only 0.15 volumes; according to Section B. That difference will be hardly noticable on the tongue or in the glass, and it certainly won't cause a bottle bomb situation. If anything the beer will be slightly overcarbed, which is better than under carbing. I used to bottle for years before anyone ...


3

Looking around it seems that the answer is go with the 55 degrees. Because CO2 was dissolving into your beer even while it was cold crashing. So basically if you are going to prime at 55 degrees, use 55. But if you are going to let it warm up and then prime, then use that temperature (say 63 degrees you mentioned). Note that at 55 degrees it may take quite a ...


3

It's certainly possible - a starter is only fermented to completion, but not conditioned, so byproducts of fermentation, such as acetaldehyde (green apple) and acetolactate (which becomes diacetyl - butter/butterscotch) are still left in the beer. This have low taste thresholds (50ppb for diacetyl), so it doesn't take much for you to notice then. In a ...


3

Sure, that's a good idea. Give it a week or 2 cold and it should clear up.


2

Really, it's about aroma vs. flavoring or bittering hops. The longer it takes for your wort to cool, the more those late hop additions turn from aroma hops to flavoring (and to some extent bittering) hops. For less hoppy styles, this obviously isn't as big an issue, but if you want to make an IPA or APA with that hop "nose" you'll want to cool quickly. ...


2

The cold crash likely just shocked your yeast into dormancy a bit. If you added an appropriate amount of priming sugar they should carbonate. It will just take more time. I always found two weeks a little short for me. If you notice there is plenty of yeast on the bottom of the bottles you can gently invert them and rouse the yeast up into the beer. ...


2

10 weeks is a long time for a yeast slurry to sit. You may want to add some additional yeast. Brew Strong: Repitching Yeast


2

Cold crashing will definitely reduce the amount of yeast found in the bottle. And with less yeast in suspension there will be less floatables to reflect light, meaning your beer will appear darker than it would had you skipped cold crashing. I agree with @cleber in that you definitely will need extra time to properly carb up your bottles but everything ...


2

I think there are several reasons why cold crashing works, but they all come down to affecting various parts of the equation for drag (in other words, gravity is doing all of the work). First, cold promotes early flocculation of yeast. Yeast clump together and form flocs as a survival reaction to adverse environmental conditions, with cold being one of ...


2

At the simplest level, cold crashing is about reducing any exothermic heat from yeast metabolism, since this causes convection and interferes with the sedimentation. Cold crashing temperatures can (and should) be a good deal cooler than serving temps. Despite what is common practice, most, if not all beer, be served above ice-cold temperatures to properly ...


2

After 5 months of cold storage, there would but next to no viable yeast left in the beer. Store it for a couple more weeks, somewhere warm, and you may get lucky. If not, you'll want to remove the caps, add a couple grains of dry yeast to each bottle, and recap. Don't worry too much about oxygen, as the renewed fermentation should consume any oxygen that's ...


2

Wyeast 1272 American Ale II is has a flocculation level of medium. You can get certainly clear beer from this yeast, you just need to give the yeast time to settle out. Cold crashing is a great way to do accelerate this process, 35F is fine, as close to freezing without freezing - how low you can go depends on how accurate your temp control is. Use a ...


2

I routinely do this. Namely because of time constraints as well. My normal brewing process involves brewing once a month. So when brewing the next batch I am tending to the previous batch which was fermented and then crash for a month.


1

If the beer sits for 4-5 days, any disturbed sediment will settle out again, and then some. In Winter, I cold crash in my garage, and then rack to the bottling bucket in the garage before moving back inside (be sure to cover the spigot with a sanitized plastic bag and keep everything sanitary). I put the bucket on top of a crate when I start cold crashing, ...


1

I would certainly move it down there and just do my bottling down there as well so as not to disturb the sediment again. I cold crash all my beer and I sometimes use gelatin (plain knox) once the beer is cold to further clarify it. The trub will be disturbed by carrying it down stairs, but if you have enough time, the cold (with or without the gelatin) will ...


1

Temperature at its core is a measurement of particle velocity. The colder something gets the slower the particles and atoms are moving. When you cold crash you are slowing down the nano-scopic movement of all these particles (macro and otherwise). The less they collide with each other and the slower the move, the more effective gravity is at pulling them ...


1

Cold Crashing clarifies cider by causing the yeast to clump together, or "flocculate." These clumps of yeast then fall out of suspension much faster than individual cells (due to some fluid dynamics that I won't pretend to understand). Flocculation depends on many factors, chief among them, yeast strain, but temperature plays a major factor. For the majority ...


1

You will want to dry-hop at normal/fermentation temps for the best hop oil extraction. Dry-hopping cold is going to be an inefficient use of precious hops. If you're worried about (or better: experience via experiment) low bottle carbonation/refermentation, you can always pitch new yeast during bottling. Some highly-flocculant strains might be ...


1

You should have enough yeast still in solution after cold crashing before you bottle. You should not have any issues with this much time. If you were to wait a few months then I would worry. If you do cold crash in the bottle there will be some increased sediment but if you are careful when you pour no a problem If you are going to dry hop in your ...


1

I don't have experience in cold crashing, so can't answer all the questions, but here are my 2 cents: I wouldn't worry about yeast on the bottles on a imperial stout, you probably won't see or taste any of it due to the roasted malt flavors. For the same reason I wouldn't do dry hopping, you won't notice the smell of the hops due to the roasted malts and ...


1

"Is chilling always needed?" Absolutely not. Look into No Chill Brewing. However, it doesn't work all that well for beers with a lot of aroma hops. But for low/no hop aroma beers, it's a snap. I haven't chilled a beer in 20+ batches now.



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