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6

For how much coffee to use, check out the recent "Can You Brew It" where they tried to clone Terrapin's Wake-n-Bake stout. They worked from the exact recipe as given to them by the brewer at Terrapin. You can even buy the same blend of coffee they use commercially, if that interests you. I just listened to it this week because I also have a big stout ...


6

Campden doesn't kill cultured yeast, at least not at the levels you'd want to use it at without significantly hindering the flavor and aroma of your beer. The problem with using Campden (Potassium Metabisulfite) is that it adds significant levels of free and bound SO2 to your beer. This will cause your beer to smell and taste like sulfur. Wine is ...


6

There are a couple ways you can go about this. Just put the beans right into the secondary. You are essentially "Cold Brewing" at that point. (For about 3-4 days) Cold brew the coffee and use the syrup, and just add to taste. Definitely stay away from brewing it first you'll end up with that burnt acidic taste. As for the amount, this is really a ...


6

I would make a pot of really strong coffee in a french press or whatever (or espresso if you've got a machine). Ideally, add it to the secondary, because the primary fermentation will blow off a lot of the nice aroma. I've done this in a stout before and used about 4 tablespoons of coffee in 1 pint cafetiere.


6

I recently did a breakfast stout and simply put some ground coffee beans into the mash. I put 1 cup of ground dunkin donuts coffee in there. The coffee flavor is definitely there without being overwhelming. You can also cold brew some coffee and add at secondary or at bottling.


5

Addressing your sanitation questions: Coffee: One of your questions, paraphrased: Should I worry about secondary infection from coffee in secondary? I'd say your risk, much like the risk of most things brewing, is not from the water, which you can pre-boil on the stove or in the microwave, or the coffee which will be subject to a pretty high temperature ...


3

Black malt and Roasted Barley will deliver coffee notes. Using anywhere from 0.5lb up to 1lb of either (or in combination) per 5 gallon batch is the norm. Caramel notes are easily delivered from crystal/caramel malts. I have used a full pound of Crystal 60L in a brown ale and it had a real nice toffee/caramel punch to it. Using less than a pound of ...


3

The lines between the two blur a bit due to historical evolution porter was a dark raosty and smokey brew. When brewers made them stronger they were referred to as Stout porters to indicate strength. In time the two have seperated slightly enough to warrant different catagories for each. Today Porters tend to be drier with a somewhat more acrid or ashy ...


2

We did an Irish oatmeal coffee stout and added 1 pot of good strong coffee right to the primary before pitching yeast. This kind of threw off any specific gravity readings, but we knew the thing was going to be strong enough anyhow.


2

I use 2 methods....you can "dry bean" the beer in secondary using 4-8 poz. of coarsely cracked beans. That produces great aroma and a bit of flavor. For more coffee flavor, I add strong coffee at bottling or kegging time to taste. That's much easier to control than additions to the kettle or secondary.


2

Grind your coffee beans sometime during your boil. The later in the boil the better. Place the grinds into a muslin bag. When your boil is complete and the wort drops under 210F, hang the muslin bag of grind into the hot wort. I usually go for around 5-10 minutes. Remove muslin bag and start your chill. You definitely do NOT want to put the coffee in ...


2

In a nutshell, it's to do with strength. Just to contra the downvote, Brad Smith, author of beersmith has blogged about porter, and links to several recipes. I've looked over the recipes, and the darker ones could easily be taken as stout recipes, and the lighter ones, brown ale recipes. I remember the guide telling at the Dublin Guinness brewery that they ...


2

I use a double French roast. Very dark, very mellow. I use about 5 oz. of coarsely cracked beans in secondary for aroma, then add brewed coffee to taste at packaging time.


2

There are a number of ways to brew with actual coffee: Add hot or cold brewed coffee to the beer Soak coffee grounds in the beer (usually at flameout, or in secondary) For both techniques the coffee can be added at various points in the brewing cycle: at the end of the boil, after fermentation has finished, or at bottling/kegging time. Opinions vary on ...


2

I know you are looking for an amount of coffee to add, but actual coffee is not the way to get coffee flavor out of your brew. the coffee bean contains oils which will inhibit your head retention and some other effects. I'm no expert on this topic so do your own research, but I use grains like chocolate malt,and some roasted barley depending on what coffee ...


2

Try starting in the mash or specialty grain to add your coffee flavor. Add some roasted barley to impart that coffee flavor right away. This has given me a good coffee base on many of my brews. Next, cold extract your coffee using the following technique from Radical Brewing: This is a way of getting very smooth coffee flavor to add to your beer. Add ...


2

A friend of mine said he had cold brewed coffee using a french press. This makes it less bitter and you still get a lot of the good coffee flavors [http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2012/05/how-to-cold-brew-coffee.html]. Still will have to adjust the overall amount you add though and keep the balance with the hops. His beer he made this way turned out ...


2

You don't want to boil the grains, that will make the beer very harsh and astringent (like tea that has stewed too long.) Looks like you got it backwards - start at 165°F to steep the grains, then remove the grains and then turn on the heat bring the liquid to a boil. You need to steep both the grains and oats in hot water - so that the whole mixture ...


2

Though I admire your efforts tremendously, wouldn't it be easier to go with a more straightforward recipe for your 1st non-kit brew? Just my opinion, but it might help you hone your skills. Vanilla, Coffee, Oatmeal, Milk? All in the same brew? Why not just start with an Oatmeal Stout first?


1

It will mellow some, but not much. I find that when I make a coffee beer recipe I have to do several test batches to get the level of hop bittering correct in order to complement the coffee.


1

You are correct in that there is some ambiguity in that recipe, but it's not where you think it is. Here's the lines from the recipe that concern me: "Coffee was Kona coarse ground beans french pressed and allowed to cool to room temp in press. " "boil 10 min 1lb Coffee" I would take line 1 at face value: take 1lb of Kona coffee (coarse ground), French ...


1

Just one more thing on the subject, i don't think i have seen Black roasted Barley on any Porter recipe and most Stout recipes do.


1

I've not used Horizon, but reviews show that it's not a citrus bomb, but on the whole neutral and clean, with some earthiness and spiciness. To my mind, those qualities are good with stouts. For the aroma addition, I would probably go with Wiliamette or similar hop (Ultra, Tettanger, Hallertau, Crystal, although that's a bit pungent) - Centennial is very ...


1

If your brother is a hop head what about doing a Cascadian dark ale (http://www.byo.com/stories/beer-styles/article/indices/11-beer-styles/2072-birth-of-a-new-style-cascadian-dark-ale) like Deschutes Hop in the Dark. I bet that would pair well with your chicory coffee. That way you get the best of all worlds, and the dark and roasted malt wouldn't ...


1

The easiest way to do it is not add flavorings to the fermenter or kettle. Add them after the beer is fermented so you can test and control the amounts. After fermentation, before bottling or kegging, I pour 4 2 oz. samples of the beer. I does each with a different, measured amount of flavoring then taste. I pick the one I like best then scale that amount ...


1

I make up a pot of coffee or two and put it in at bottling time. Two regular strength pots gives my coffee stout a very noticeable flavor. I put one pot in the last time I made the beer and it was a little weak. I think the burnt flavors depend on the kind of coffee you use. Try using a lighter roast. My coffee stout does not have burnt off-flavors.


1

Well, I did it a bit differently. I did a coffee porter, 3 gallons. I put the espresso ground medium roast coffee in the mash. This stuff is like ROCKET FUEL! http://mckenna.tv/brew/?p=272 It was VERY astringent at first, but has mellowed nicely.


1

I have added coffee to porter in the past. The most important thing was to cold brew the coffee, which helps to not release the acids you need to be worried about as well as minimizing oils. I just ground up a bunch of coffee, put it in a clean glass jar with some water and let it sit in the fridge over night. We got the coffee from a local coffee roaster, ...



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