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4

In my experience, quick-disconnects such as this are entirely reliable for what you propose. In fact, it's more often than not that the hose barbs the QD's are connected to are what fails, rather than the QD's themselves. Safety-wise, it's no different than having anything else attached to the low-pressure side of your regulator. Anything beyond the on-off ...


3

Generally: no; most homebrewer-scale fermentation and bright tanks are not rated for pressure, though it really depends on what sort of vessel you're using. Some people do ferment directly in a keg, and use a spunding valve to naturally retain CO₂ directly from the fermentation process, such that the beer can directly be served or bottled.


3

I have tested this personally and have not been able to record any perceivable differences in SG readings. Sometimes degassing will invigorate a slow ferment but nothing more than a good stir would. I do see your math behind the ABV increase and I still believe that to be true as well. Degassing is something you should be doing throughout primary and into ...


3

As brewchez stated it mostly for stouts with a nitro faucet in the homebrew world. But Beergas is preferred commercially if a tap run is really long. The Beergas allows them to push at much higher psi without overcarbonating beer along the way, for all styles of beer.


3

Most draft systems for homebrewers use just normal CO2. The beer gas of N2 and CO2 is used for 'nitro' dispense depending on the N2/CO2 ratio.


2

"At 10 °C and 5.6 atm, a cooled champagne bottle (V = 0.75 L) would contain ca. 9.5 g of dissolved carbon dioxide (Table 2) [3]. Once the bottle is opened the CO2 pressure falls to at most 1 atm. Solubility considerations dictate that at 10 °C no more than 1.7 g will remain dissolved, so roughly 8 g of CO2 must suddenly be set free. This quantity of CO2 ...


2

There are only two safety factors: Pressure. Output of one element must be in safe range of another element's input. If it isn't, you can use pressure reducer. Fittings. They must, well, fit. It's not enough for them to somehow snap, they have to work with each other by design and by technical papers. And must be designed to work at the pressure, see point ...


1

Its not impossible to know how much CO2 is dissolved in the beer. There are tools for measuring it. Many professional breweries use these tools because have an exact carbonation level is important to them. As homebrewers we don't normally buy these tools so we can make random measurements. That said. It is well known how many volumes of CO2 are dissolved ...


1

ABV is Alcohol By Volume. Carbonation does not change the volume. So it would not effect the ABV. c02 is dissolved into the liquid. Meaning that the c02 molecules fit in between the liquid molecules and do not change the total volume of the liquid. As long as the c02 is trapped the liquid volume is unchanged, once released (bubbles) the gas displaces liquid ...


1

You can also add fermentable sugars to a bottle or keg to carbonate the beer. You do not have to carbonate in a keg.



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