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4

In my experience, quick-disconnects such as this are entirely reliable for what you propose. In fact, it's more often than not that the hose barbs the QD's are connected to are what fails, rather than the QD's themselves. Safety-wise, it's no different than having anything else attached to the low-pressure side of your regulator. Anything beyond the on-off ...


4

You've made sugar wine, called kilju in Finland. It's also the precursor to rum, which is distilled from a wine made from sugar cane juice or molasses. It's safe to drink, but to everyone's taste.


4

Any way you take a sample (unless it's from a pressurized vessel with an outlet) will draw air in. As you suspect, it should be a small amount, and given that your beer A) may still be fermenting (which CO2 will help strip any introduced oxygen out of the beer) and B) definitely still has yeast in it (which will scavenge oxygen, as long as it's still alive), ...


3

Generally: no; most homebrewer-scale fermentation and bright tanks are not rated for pressure, though it really depends on what sort of vessel you're using. Some people do ferment directly in a keg, and use a spunding valve to naturally retain CO₂ directly from the fermentation process, such that the beer can directly be served or bottled.


2

There are only two safety factors: Pressure. Output of one element must be in safe range of another element's input. If it isn't, you can use pressure reducer. Fittings. They must, well, fit. It's not enough for them to somehow snap, they have to work with each other by design and by technical papers. And must be designed to work at the pressure, see point ...


2

"At 10 °C and 5.6 atm, a cooled champagne bottle (V = 0.75 L) would contain ca. 9.5 g of dissolved carbon dioxide (Table 2) [3]. Once the bottle is opened the CO2 pressure falls to at most 1 atm. Solubility considerations dictate that at 10 °C no more than 1.7 g will remain dissolved, so roughly 8 g of CO2 must suddenly be set free. This quantity of CO2 ...


1

You can also add fermentable sugars to a bottle or keg to carbonate the beer. You do not have to carbonate in a keg.


1

There's no need for an airlock. By the time you get to cold crashing, fermentation is done so the need for an airlock is gone. I seal the fermenter using a solid stopper before cold crashing.



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